2006 United States Senate election in Arizona

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United States Senate election in Arizona, 2006

← 2000 November 7, 2006 2012 →
  Jon Kyl, official 109th Congress photo.jpg No image.png
Nominee Jon Kyl Jim Pederson
Party Republican Democratic
Popular vote 814,398 664,141
Percentage 53.3% 43.5%

2006 Arizona.png
County Results

Pederson:      50–60%      60–70%

Kyl:      50–60%      60–70%

U.S. Senator before election

Jon Kyl
Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

Jon Kyl
Republican

The 2006 United States Senate election in Arizona was held November 7, 2006. The primary elections were held September 12. Incumbent Republican Jon Kyl won re-election to a third term.

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

  • Jon Kyl, incumbent U.S. Senator since 1995

Results[edit]

Republican primary results[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jon Kyl (Incumbent) 297,636 99.5%
Republican Write-ins 155 0.05%
Total votes 297,791 100.00%

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Results[edit]

Democratic primary results[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jim Pederson 214,455 100.00%
Total votes 214,455 100.00%

Libertarian primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Results[edit]

Libertarian primary results[1]
Party Candidate Votes %
Libertarian Richard Mack 3,311 100.00%
Total votes 3,311 100.00%

General election[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Campaign[edit]

The incumbent, Republican Jon Kyl, was elected to the Senate in 1994 and was re-elected to a second term in 2000; prior to that he spent eight years in the US House of Representatives. Kyl's Democratic opponent for the general election was wealthy real-estate developer Jim Pederson, who served as the Arizona Democratic Party Chairman from 2001 to 2005. During his tenure, Pederson spent millions of dollars of his own money to help Democrats modernize and to elect Janet Napolitano as Governor of Arizona. The deadline for signing petition signatures to appear on the September 12, 2006 primary ballot was June 14, 2006.

Not long after the 2004 election, Pederson's name began being mentioned as a potential Senate candidate for the 2006 race. On July 28, 2005, Pederson formally stepped down as Chairman of the Arizona Democratic Party, further fueling those speculations. In early September 2005, an e-mail was sent from the Arizona Democratic Party's website, inviting people to an announcement by Pederson on September 7. In an anticlimactic move, an e-mail was sent out shortly after the first saying that the announcement would be postponed due to Hurricane Katrina. It was requested that any money that would be donated to Pederson's campaign at the announcement be directed to relief efforts instead. Similarly, a meeting in Arizona of the Democratic National Committee (DNC) was scheduled for around the same time. It was also postponed and the same request was made involving donations. On September 7, 2005, Pederson filed to run for the U.S. Senate. On September 14, 2005, Pederson formally announced his intention to run, in his hometown of Casa Grande, Arizona.

Although Kyl started the campaign with a sizable lead in most polls, the gap quickly narrowed, especially after Pederson released his array of ads.

Debates[edit]

Fundraising[edit]

The race was one of the most expensive in Arizona history. As of May 7, 2006, Kyl's campaign had raised over $9 million, primarily from private donations from Oil and Energy companies and large fundraising dinners. Pederson's campaign had raised over $5 million, primarily through a dinner event with former President Clinton and a $2 million donation from Pederson.[2]

Polling[edit]

Source Date Kyl (R) Pederson (D) Mack (L)
Arizona State University October 28, 2005 50% 28%
Rasmussen December 26, 2005 50% 30%
Behavior Research Center January 22, 2006 55% 26%
SurveyUSA February 27, 2006 57% 33%
Zogby/WSJ March 30, 2006 47% 42%
Rasmussen April 4, 2006 56% 33%
Arizona State University/KAET-TV April 20–23, 2006 42% 31%
Rasmussen April 30, 2006 51% 35%
SurveyUSA May 8, 2006 52% 37%
Behavior Research Center May 18, 2006 40% 33%
Rasmussen June 11, 2006 52% 35%
Arizona State University/KAET-TV June 20, 2006 43% 29%
Zogby/WSJ June 21, 2006 48% 42%
SurveyUSA July 17, 2006 52% 40%
Zogby/WSJ July 24, 2006 50% 40%
Behavior Research Center July 26, 2006 45% 27%
Rasmussen August 2, 2006 53% 34%
Zogby/WSJ August 28, 2006 48% 44%
Arizona State University/KAET-TV August 29, 2006 46% 36%
Rasmussen August 31, 2006 52% 35%
Harstad Strategic Research (D) September 7, 2006 47% 41%
Zogby/WSJ September 11, 2006 50% 44%
Rasmussen September 18, 2006 50% 39%
SurveyUSA September 19, 2006 48% 43% 2%
Arizona State University/KAET-TV September 26, 2006 49% 38% 2%
Zogby/WSJ September 28, 2006 51% 44%
Behavior Research Center October 4, 2006 40% 34%
Northern Arizona University October 17, 2006 49% 33% 2%
SurveyUSA October 17, 2006 48% 43% 4%
Rasmussen October 19, 2006 51% 42%
Zogby/WSJ October 19, 2006 50% 44%
Arizona State University/KAET-TV October 24, 2006 47% 41% 3%
Zimmerman/Marketing Intelligence October 25–30, 2006 46% 41% 4%
SurveyUSA November 3, 2006 53% 40% 4%
Mason-Dixon/MSNBC-McClatchy November 5, 2006 49% 41% 3%

Results[edit]

Pederson lost the election by 9.84% or 150,257 votes, despite Democratic Incumbent Governor Janet Napolitano easily being re-elected and winning every county statewide. While Pederson lost it was still notable, as it was the worst performance of Senator Kyl's career. Kyl did well as Republicans usually do in Maricopa County home of Phoenix. Pederson did well in Pima County home of Tucson which tends to support Democrats. Kyl was called the winner by CNN at around 8 P.M. local time, 11 P.M. EST. Pederson called Senator Kyl and conceded defeat at 9:02 P.M. local time, 12:02 A.M. EST.

United States Senate election in Arizona, 2006[3]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Republican Jon Kyl (Incumbent) 814,398 53.34% -25.98%
Democratic Jim Pederson 664,141 43.50% +43.50
Libertarian Richard Mack 48,231 3.16% -1.90%
Write-ins 13 0.00%
Majority 150,257 9.84% 61.66%
Turnout 1,526,782
Republican hold Swing

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on September 20, 2013. Retrieved January 6, 2014.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  2. ^ Our Campaigns - News - Kyl may seek an exemption to add cash to his war chest - Aug 23, 2006
  3. ^ http://clerk.house.gov/member_info/electionInfo/2006/2006Stat.htm#3