2017 United States Senate special election in Alabama

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2017 United States Senate special election in Alabama

← 2014 December 12, 2017 (2017-12-12) 2020 →
Turnout40.54%[1] Increase
  Senator Doug Jones official photo crop.jpg Judge Roy Moore (cropped 2).jpg
Nominee Doug Jones Roy Moore
Party Democratic Republican
Popular vote 673,896 651,972
Percentage 50.0% 48.3%

2017 United States Senate special election in Alabama results map by county.svg
County results
Jones:      50–60%      60–70%      70–80%      80–90%
Moore:      40–50%      50–60%      60–70%      70–80%      80–90%

U.S. Senator before election

Luther Strange
Republican

Elected U.S. Senator

Doug Jones
Democratic

A special election for the United States Senate in Alabama took place on December 12, 2017, to fill a vacancy in the U.S. Senate through the end of the term ending on January 3, 2021, arising from the resignation on February 8, 2017, of Jeff Sessions to serve as the 84th United States Attorney General. Democratic candidate Doug Jones defeated Republican candidate Roy Moore by a margin of 21,924 votes (1.7%). Jones is the first Democrat to win a U.S. Senate seat in the state since 1992.

On February 9, 2017, Governor Robert J. Bentley appointed Luther Strange, the Attorney General of Alabama, to fill the vacancy until a special election could take place. Bentley controversially scheduled the special election to align with the 2018 general election instead of sooner.[2][3] When Kay Ivey succeeded Bentley as governor, she rescheduled the special election for December 12, 2017.[4]

Jones, a former U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Alabama, won the Democratic primary election. Moore, a former Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Alabama, competed with Strange and Mo Brooks in the August 15, 2017 Republican primary; the two highest vote-getters, Moore and Strange, advanced to a runoff.[5] President Donald Trump supported Moore's opponent Strange during the primary runoff, in addition to much of the Republican establishment in the Senate, including Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, who made the success of Strange's candidacy a major priority.[6][7] Trump's efforts on behalf of Strange included a rally in Huntsville, Alabama, plus tweeting, and Vice President Mike Pence also campaigned for Strange.[8][9] With McConnell's help, Strange outspent Moore by a margin of 10-to-1.[8][10] However, Moore won the primary runoff on September 26, 2017.[9][11] This was the first time that an incumbent U.S. Senator having active White House support lost a primary since Arlen Specter lost to Joe Sestak in 2010.[12]

In mid-November of 2017, multiple women alleged that Moore had made unwanted advances or sexual assaults on them when he was in his early thirties and they were in their teens (the youngest was 14 at the time), attracting widespread national media coverage of the election.[13][14] As a result of these allegations, many national Republican leaders and office holders called for Moore to withdraw from the special election or rescinded their endorsements of him.[15][16][17] However, Donald Trump and many Alabama Republicans reaffirmed their support.[18] At the time of the revelations, it was too late to remove his name from the ballot. Many Republican leaders proposed shifting their support to a write-in candidate such as Strange.[19] Moore has stated that he never engaged in sexual misconduct, although he has not denied that he approached or dated teenagers over the age of 16 while he was in his 30s. Sixteen is the legal age of consent in Alabama.[20][21] In late November, retired Marine Colonel Lee Busby launched a write-in campaign.[22]

At 9:23 p.m. CST, the Associated Press called the election for Jones, though Moore refused to concede.[23][24] Jones is the first Democratic candidate to win a statewide election in Alabama since former Lieutenant Governor Lucy Baxley was elected president of the Alabama Public Service Commission in 2008.[25]

Jones was sworn into office on January 3, 2018, becoming the first Democratic U.S. Senator from Alabama since Howell Heflin's retirement in 1997.[26]

It was later reported that similar tactics allegedly used by Russia to interfere in the 2016 presidential election were employed in the special election in order to influence the election in favor of Doug Jones. New Knowledge, a small cyber security firm run by Jonathan Morgan, which was behind one of the Senate reports on Russian election interference, spent $100,000, independent of Jones, to create Facebook groups posing as conservatives encouraging write-in votes in lieu of voting for Roy Moore and promoted the idea that the Moore campaign was being amplified on social media due to a Russian botnet. Morgan said that he intended the project as a small experiment in understanding such online tactics, not to affect the election.[27][28] The New York Times reported that the experiment was "likely too small to have a significant effect on the race."

Background[edit]

Potential appointees[edit]

Following then-President-elect Donald Trump's nomination of then-Senator Sessions to be U.S. Attorney General, Robert Aderholt, a member of the United States House of Representatives, had asked to be appointed to the seat.[29] Representative Mo Brooks had also expressed interest in the seat, while Strange had stated before being selected that he would run for the seat in the special election whether or not he was appointed.[30][31] Other potential choices Bentley interviewed for the appointment included Moore, Del Marsh, the President Pro Tempore of the Alabama Senate, and Jim Byard, the director of the Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs.[32]

Republican primary[edit]

Campaign[edit]

The Republican primary attracted national attention, especially following Trump's endorsement of incumbent Senator Luther Strange. Strange was backed by several key figures within the Republican establishment, most notably Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell. His two main rivals in the primary consisted of former state judge Roy Moore and Mo Brooks. While Strange showed no signs of losing the first round of the primary, almost every opinion poll showed him trailing Roy Moore in a runoff. Strange came in second place in the first round of the primary behind Roy Moore, securing a spot in the runoff.[33]

National interest in the race dramatically increased in the month before the runoff. Strange maintained his endorsement from Trump, who campaigned for him in Huntsville during the closing days of the campaign.[34] Trump's endorsement of Strange sparked criticism among his own base, many of whom preferred Moore and detested Strange for his seemingly establishment feel. Several notable people close to Trump broke from the President to endorse Moore, including HUD Secretary Ben Carson and Breitbart Executive Chairman Steve Bannon. Despite the endorsement of Trump, Strange was handily defeated by Roy Moore in the runoff.[35]

Candidates[edit]

Nominated[edit]

Eliminated in runoff[edit]

Eliminated in primary[edit]

Withdrew[edit]

Declined[edit]

Endorsements[edit]

Roy Moore
U.S. Cabinet officials
Former U.S. Senators
U.S. Representatives
Former U.S. Representatives
Governors
Statewide officials
State senators
State Representatives
Other individuals
Organizations
Luther Strange
U.S. President
U.S. Vice President
U.S. Senators
Former state representatives
Organizations
Mo Brooks
U.S. Representatives
State representatives
  • Ed Henry, state representative, chairman of Donald Trump's Alabama campaign[113]
Other individuals
Organizations

First round[edit]

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin
of error
James
Beretta
Joseph
Breault
Randy
Brinson
Mo
Brooks
Mary
Maxwell
Roy
Moore
Bryan
Peeples
Trip
Pittman
Luther
Strange
Undecided
Trafalgar Group (R) August 12–13, 2017 870 ± 3.3% 1% 1% 6% 17% 1% 38% 1% 6% 24% 5%
Emerson College August 10–12, 2017 373 ± 5.0% 1% 0% 0% 15% 0% 29% 0% 10% 32% 11%
Trafalgar Group (R) August 8–10, 2017 1,439 ± 2.6% 1% 1% 4% 20% 2% 35% 1% 6% 23% 8%
Cygnal (R) August 8–9, 2017 502 ± 4.4% 2% 18% 31% 7% 23% 13%
Strategy Research August 7, 2017 2,000 ± 2.0% 1% 1% 1% 19% 4% 35% 1% 9% 29% 0%
JMC Analytics (R) August 5–6, 2017 500 ± 4.4% 2% 19% 30% 6% 22% 17%
RRH Elections (R) July 31 – August 3, 2017 426 ± 5.0% 2% 18% 31% 8% 29% 11%
Strategy Research July 24, 2017 3,000 ± 2.0% 1% 1% 2% 16% 5% 33% 2% 5% 35%
Cygnal (R) July 20–21, 2017 500 ± 2.0% 16% 26% 33%

Results[edit]

Republican primary results, August 15, 2017[5]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Roy Moore 164,524 38.9%
Republican Luther Strange (incumbent) 138,971 32.8%
Republican Mo Brooks 83,287 19.7%
Republican Trip Pittman 29,124 6.9%
Republican Randy Brinson 2,978 0.6%
Republican Bryan Peeples 1,579 0.4%
Republican Mary Maxwell 1,543 0.4%
Republican James Beretta 1,078 0.3%
Republican Dom Gentile 303 0.1%
Republican Joseph Breault 252 0.1%
Total votes 423,282 100.0%

Runoff[edit]

President Donald Trump supported Moore's opponent Strange during the primary runoff, and almost the whole national Republican establishment wanted Strange to win.[7] Trump's efforts on behalf of Strange included a rally in Alabama, plus tweeting.[9]

Debates[edit]

Averages[edit]

Model Moore Strange Spread
RealClearPolitics[123] 52.5% 41.5% Moore +11.0

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin
of error
Roy
Moore
Luther
Strange
Undecided
Cygnal (R) September 23–24, 2017 996 ± 3.1% 52% 41% 7%
Trafalgar Group (R) September 23–24, 2017 1,073 ± 3.0% 57% 41% 2%
Optimus (R) September 22–23, 2017 1,045 ± 2.9% 55% 45%
Emerson College September 21–23, 2017 367 ± 5.1% 50% 40% 10%
Gravis Marketing September 21–22, 2017 559 ± 4.1% 48% 40% 12%
Strategy Research September 20, 2017 2,000 ± 3.0% 54% 46%
Strategy Research September 18, 2017 2,930 ± 3.0% 53% 47%
JMC Analytics (R) September 16–17, 2017 500 ± 4.4% 47% 39% 14%
Voter Consumer Research (R-SLF) September 9–10, 2017 604 ± 4.0% 41% 40% 19%
Emerson College September 8–9, 2017 355 ± 5.2% 40% 26% 34%
Strategic National September 6–7, 2017 800 ± 3.5% 51% 35% 14%
Southeast Research August 29–31, 2017 401 ± 5.0% 52% 36% 12%
Harper Polling August 24–26, 2017 600 ± 4.0% 47% 45% 8%
Voter Consumer Research (R-SLF) August 21–23, 2017 601 ± 4.0% 45% 41% 14%
Opinion Savvy August 22, 2017 494 ± 4.4% 50% 32% 18%
JMC Analytics (R) August 17–19, 2017 515 ± 4.3% 51% 32% 17%
Cygnal (R) August 8–9, 2017 502 ± 4.4% 45% 34% 11%
RRH Elections (R) July 31 – August 3, 2017 426 ± 5.0% 34% 32% 34%

Results[edit]

Republican primary runoff results, September 26, 2017[124]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Roy Moore 262,204 54.6%
Republican Luther Strange (incumbent) 218,066 45.4%
Total votes 480,270 100.0%

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Nominated[edit]

Eliminated in primary[edit]

Withdrew[edit]

  • Ron Crumpton, activist, nominee for the state senate in 2014 and nominee for the U.S. Senate in 2016[132][64]
  • Brian McGee, retired teacher and Vietnam War veteran[38][133][134]

Declined[edit]

Endorsements[edit]

Doug Jones
U.S. Vice President
U.S. Senator
U.S. Representatives
State figures
Newspapers
Other individuals
Organizations
Robert Kennedy Jr.
Individual
  • Carl Lewis, Olympic gold medalist, University of Houston track and field head coach[156]

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin
of error
Will
Boyd
Vann
Caldwell
Jason
Fisher
Michael
Hansen
Doug
Jones
Robert
Kennedy Jr.
Charles
Nana
Undecided
Emerson College August 10–12, 2017 164 ± 7.6% 8% 2% 1% 0% 40% 23% 1% 25%
Strategy Research August 7, 2017 2,000 ± 2.0% 9% 5% 3% 7% 30% 40% 5%
Strategy Research July 24, 2017 3,000 ± 2.0% 6% 4% 4% 4% 28% 49% 5%

Results[edit]

Democratic primary results[5]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Doug Jones 109,105 66.1%
Democratic Robert Kennedy Jr. 29,215 17.7%
Democratic Michael Hansen 11,105 6.7%
Democratic Will Boyd 8,010 4.9%
Democratic Jason Fisher 3,478 2.1%
Democratic Brian McGee 1,450 0.9%
Democratic Charles Nana 1,404 0.9%
Democratic Vann Caldwell 1,239 0.8%
Total votes 165,006 100.0%

Independents and write-in candidates[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

  • Ron Bishop (L, write-in)[157]
  • Lee Busby (R, write-in), retired Marine colonel[158]
  • Jeff "Cog" Coggin (I, write-in), Air Force veteran[159]
  • Chanda Mills Crutcher (I, write-in), minister[160]
  • Eulas Kirtdoll (I, write-in)[161]
  • Arlester "Mack" McBride (I, write-in)[162]
  • Mac Watson (R, write-in)[163]

Declined[edit]

General election[edit]

Controversies[edit]

Roy Moore sexual misconduct allegations[edit]

On November 9, The Washington Post reported that four women had accused Roy Moore of engaging in sexual conduct with them when they were teenagers and he was an assistant district attorney in his thirties. One of the women was 14 years old at the time, below the legal age of consent.[13] A few days later a fifth woman said that she had received unwanted attention from Moore when she was 15 years old, and that in December 1977 or January 1978,[164] when she was 16, Moore sexually assaulted her.[14][165] Moore denied the allegations.

After this, certain Republican leaders and conservative organizations withdrew their endorsements of Moore or asked him to drop out of the campaign. These included Texas Senator Ted Cruz, U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions, Ivanka Trump,[166] the National Republican Senatorial Committee,[167] former Republican presidential nominees Mitt Romney[168] and John McCain,[169] Republican Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell,[170] Ohio Governor John Kasich,[171] Utah Senator Mike Lee,[172] Montana Senator Steve Daines,[173] and House Representatives Barbara Comstock, Carlos Curbelo, and Adam Kinzinger, as well as the Young Republican Federation of Alabama.[174][175][176][177][178] Other conservative websites and organizations such as National Review urged readers not to vote for Moore.[179][180] Despite this, Moore continued to receive support from the state party and a week before the election, President Donald Trump strongly endorsed Moore.[181] Following Trump's endorsement, the RNC reinstated their support for him,[182] and Republican leaders said they would "let the people of Alabama decide" whether to elect Moore.[183]

At the time of the revelations, it was too close to the election for Moore's name to be removed from the ballot.[184] Republican officials proposed various ways to promote an alternate Republican candidate. One suggestion was to ask Governor Kay Ivey to delay the special election until 2018,[19] but Ivey said she had no plans to change the election date.[185] Some Republicans such as Senator Lisa Murkowski floated the prospect of a write-in campaign to elect Luther Strange, with Utah Senator Orrin Hatch actively endorsing a write-in campaign for Strange.[186] However, Strange said it was "highly unlikely" that he would run a write-in campaign.[187] Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell proposed Attorney General Jeff Sessions, who formerly held the Senate seat, as a write-in candidate.[188] In late November, Retired Marine Col. Lee Busby launched a write-in campaign stating that he thought there is room for a centrist in the race.[22]

New Knowledge online tactics[edit]

In February 2019, journalist and columnist Glenn Greenwald wrote that a cybersecurity company, New Knowledge, "was caught just six weeks ago engaging in a massive scam to create fictitious Russian troll accounts on Facebook and Twitter in order to claim that the Kremlin was working to defeat Democratic Senate nominee Doug Jones in Alabama." In December 2018, The New York Times quoted a New Knowledge report stating: “We orchestrated an elaborate ‘false flag’ operation that planted the idea that the [Roy] Moore campaign was amplified on social media by a Russian botnet.'" However, The Times also reported that the operation was very small in scope and was intended as an experiment on social media tactics rather than an attempt to directly influence the election, and it was "likely too small to have a significant effect on the race." Joe Trippi, an advisor to the Jones campaign, is quoted as acknowledging the experiment but stating that "it was impossible that a $100,000 operation had an impact on the race." [28][189] The Alabama Attorney General requested the Federal Election Commission to investigate the matter.[190]

Debates[edit]

Republican nominee Roy Moore refused to debate Democratic nominee Doug Jones.[191][192][193] Moore turned down debate invitations extended by the League of Women Voters,[192] WHNT-TV and AL.com.[193][191] Jones' campaign said that Jones was "willing to debate Roy Moore anytime, anywhere" and accused Moore of "hiding from the voters, from the media and from his record for weeks."[193][191] Moore and his campaign stated that he refused to debate Jones because their policy positions were already clear to voters and thus there was no need for a formal debate.[193][191]

Predictions[edit]

Source Ranking As of
The Cook Political Report[194] Tossup December 7, 2017
Sabato's Crystal Ball[195] Tossup December 7, 2017
Rothenberg Political Report[196] Tossup December 7, 2017

Candidates[edit]

On ballot[edit]

Write-in[edit]

Endorsements[edit]

Doug Jones (D)
Former U.S. Executive Branch officials
U.S. Senators
U.S. Representatives
Governors
Former governors
State figures
Individuals
Newspapers
Organizations
Roy Moore (R)
U.S. Executive Branch officials
U.S. Senators
U.S. Representatives
Statewide office holders
State Senators
State Representatives
Sheriffs
Political commentators
Religious leaders
White nationalists
Other individuals
Organizations

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin
of error
Roy
Moore (R)
Doug
Jones (D)
Other Undecided
Change Research December 9–11, 2017 1,543 ± 2.0% 51% 45% 4%
SurveyMonkey November 30 – December 11, 2017 2,203 ± 4.5% 47% 49% 4%
Fox News December 7–10, 2017 1,127 ± 3.0% 40% 50% 2% 8%
Emerson College December 7–9, 2017 600 ± 3.9% 53% 44% 4%
Monmouth University December 6–9, 2017 546 ± 4.2% 46% 46% 2% 6%
Public Policy Polling (D)* December 7–8, 2017 1,092 ± 3.8% 46% 48% 6%
Gravis Marketing December 5–8, 2017 1,254 ± 2.8% 49% 45% 6%
Trafalgar Group (R) December 6–7, 2017 1,419 ± 3.1% 51% 46% 3%
Change Research December 5–7, 2017 2,443 ± 2.0% 51% 44% 5%
SurveyMonkey November 30 – December 7, 2017 1,559 ± 5.5% 47% 49% 4%
Strategy Research December 4, 2017 3,200 ± 2.0% 50% 43% 3% 4%
Gravis Marketing December 1–3, 2017 1,276 ± 2.7% 44% 48% 8%
Emerson College November 30 – December 2, 2017 500 ± 4.3% 49% 46% 5%[367]
YouGov November 28 – December 1, 2017 1,067 ± 3.8% 49% 43% 4% 4%
Washington Post/Schar School November 27–30, 2017 739 ± 4.5% 47% 50% 3%
JMC Analytics (R) November 27–28, 2017 650 ± 3.8% 49% 44% 5%[368] 2%
National Research Inc (R) November 26–28, 2017 600 ± 4.0% 46% 45% 9%
Change Research November 26–27, 2017 1,868 ± 2.3% 49% 44% 7%
Emerson College November 25–27, 2017 500 ± 4.3% 53% 47%
Strategy Research November 20, 2017 3,000 ± 2.0% 47% 45% 3% 5%
WT&S Consulting (R) November 18–20, 2017 11,641 ± 1.2% 46% 40% 13%
Change Research November 15–16, 2017 2,090 43% 46% 11%
National Research Inc November 13–16, 2017 600 ± 4.0% 41% 49% 10%
Gravis Marketing November 14–15, 2017 628 ± 3.5% 42% 47% 11%
Fox News November 13–15, 2017 649 ± 3.5% 42% 50% 2% 7%
Strategy Research November 13, 2017 3,000 ± 2.0% 49% 43% 8%
NRSC (R) November 12–13, 2017 500 39% 51% 10%
WT&S Consulting (R) November 11, 2017 1,536 ± 3.3% 50% 40% 11%
Emerson College November 9–11, 2017 600 ± 3.9% 55% 45%
JMC Analytics (R) November 9–11, 2017 575 ± 4.1% 44% 48% 2%[369] 6%
Change Research November 9–11, 2017 1,855 44% 40% 3% 13%
Gravis Marketing November 10, 2017 478 ± 4.5% 48% 46% 6%
WT&S Consulting (R) November 9, 2017 1,354 ± 3.5% 50% 39% 11%
Opinion Savvy November 9, 2017 515 ± 4.3% 46% 46% 4% 4%
NRSC (R) November 6–7, 2017 51% 42% 8%
Strategy Research November 6, 2017 2,200 ± 2.0% 51% 40% 9%
Axis Research (R-SLF) October 24–26, 2017 503 ± 4.5% 56% 39% 5%
Strategy Research October 19, 2017 3,000 ± 3.0% 52% 41% 7%
Strategy Research October 16, 2017 3,000 ± 2.5% 51% 40% 9%
Fox News October 14–16, 2017 801 ± 3.5% 42% 42% 3% 11%
NRSC (R) October 3–5, 2017 53% 37% 10%
Cygnal (R) October 2–5, 2017 497 ± 4.4% 49% 41% 9%
JMC Analytics (R) September 30 – October 1, 2017 500 ± 4.4% 48% 40% 1%[369] 11%
Opinion Savvy September 27–28, 2017 590 ± 4.0% 50% 45% 5%
Emerson College September 21–23, 2017 519 ± 4.3% 52% 30% 18%
Emerson College September 8–9, 2017 416 ± 4.8% 44% 40% 16%

* Unpublished poll released on December 15

Results[edit]

External video
Doug Jones election night remarks, December 12, 2017, C-SPAN
Roy Moore election night remarks, December 12, 2017, C-SPAN
Jones on stage following his victory
Write-in votes by county
  <1%
  >1%
  >2%
  >3%

Doug Jones defeated Roy Moore by a margin of 21,924 votes. Voter turnout was 40.54% of Alabama's 3,326,812[378] registered voters.

Jones won primarily by running up huge margins in the state's major cities. The state's four largest counties—Jefferson (home to the state's largest city of Birmingham), Mobile (home to Mobile), Madison (home to Huntsville), and Montgomery (home to the state capital of Montgomery)—all gave Jones 56 percent or more of the vote. He carried Jefferson by over 83,800 votes, and Montgomery by almost 30,500 votes; either county would have been more than enough to give him the victory. Jones also dominated the Black Belt. He took over 96 percent of the black vote, and 61 percent of votes from those under 45. While Moore dominated the state's rural areas outside of the Black Belt, he significantly underperformed Trump's totals in those areas, as well as the suburbs.[379]

An envelope to a Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee fundraising mailer distributed in 2018 with a reference to Jones' victory in the traditionally strongly Republican state of Alabama

As of December 15, Moore demanded a recount and refused to concede the race, despite being urged by Trump, Bannon, and others to do so. If the final margin of victory is less than 0.5%, then a recount would have been automatically triggered. If not, then either candidate can request a recount at his expense.[380][381] However, Alabama Secretary of State John Merrill estimated that a recount could cost anywhere from $1 million to $1.5 million, an amount that would have had to be paid in full when the request is made. Moore had only $636,046 on hand by the time the campaign ended.[382] A number of right-leaning websites pushed conspiracy theories about voter fraud providing the margin for Jones.[383] Merrill noted on December 20 that the only outstanding ballots were 366 military ballots and 4,967 provisional ballots; even if all those votes were for Moore, it would not have been enough to trigger an automatic recount.[384]

Because the number of write-in votes was larger than Jones' margin of victory, the names written in were both counted and listed.[385] Luther Strange, who lost the Republican primary to Moore, received the most write-in votes, followed by former White House aide Lee Busby, U.S. Rep. Mo Brooks, who also ran in the Republican Senate primary, Libertarian write-in candidate Ron Bishop, and Attorney General Jeff Sessions. Nick Saban, Alabama's head coach, finished in seventh with more than 250 votes.[386]

After the election, Moore filed a lawsuit attempting to block the state from certifying the election and calling for an investigation into voter fraud. On December 28, 2017, a judge dismissed this lawsuit and state officials certified the election results, officially declaring Doug Jones the winner.[387] Jones was sworn into office on January 3, 2018, by Vice President Mike Pence.[26] Jones became the first Democrat to win a statewide race in Alabama since former Lieutenant Governor Lucy Baxley was elected president of the Alabama Public Service Commission in 2008 over Republican Twinkle Andress Cavanaugh.[25] Prior to that, Democrat Jim Folsom Jr. was elected Lieutenant Governor of Alabama in 2006 over Republican Luther Strange.[388] The last Democrat to win a federal statewide election in Alabama was Richard Shelby in 1992, who switched to the Republican Party in late 1994.[389]

United States Senate special election in Alabama, 2017[390][391]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Democratic Doug Jones 673,896 49.97% N/A
Republican Roy Moore 651,972 48.34% −48.91%
n/a Write-ins 22,852 1.69% −1.06%
Total votes 1,348,720 100.0% N/A
Democratic gain from Republican

Results by county[edit]

Doug Jones Roy Moore Write-ins Total votes
County Votes % Votes % Votes % Turnout %
Autauga 5,615 38.38% 8,762 59.90% 253 1.73% 14,630 38.32%
Baldwin 22,261 35.60% 38,566 61.68% 1,703 2.72% 62,530 42.74%
Barbour 3,716 57.53% 2,702 41.83% 41 0.63% 6,459 38.35%
Bibb 1,567 29.95% 3,599 68.79% 66 1.26% 5,232 38.32%
Blount 2,408 16.94% 11,631 81.80% 180 1.27% 14,219 37.45%
Bullock 2,715 80.37% 656 19.42% 7 0.21% 3,378 45.53%
Butler 2,915 51.02% 2,758 48.27% 41 0.72% 5,714 42.36%
Calhoun 12,331 44.04% 15,238 54.43% 429 1.53% 27,998 36.18%
Chambers 4,257 55.75% 3,312 43.37% 67 0.88% 7,636 32.42%
Cherokee 1,529 27.09% 4,006 70.98% 109 1.93% 5,644 33.00%
Chilton 2,306 23.06% 7,563 75.62% 132 1.32% 10,001 35.42%
Choctaw 2,277 53.66% 1,949 45.93% 17 0.40% 4,243 40.10%
Clarke 4,363 51.93% 3,995 47.55% 43 0.51% 8,401 43.96%
Clay 990 27.52% 2,589 71.96% 19 0.53% 3,598 36.92%
Cleburne 600 19.37% 2,468 79.66% 30 0.97% 3,098 29.47%
Coffee 3,730 31.10% 8,063 67.22% 202 1.68% 11,995 36.52%
Colbert 6,881 46.41% 7,771 52.41% 171 1.15% 14,828 37.75%
Conecuh 2,259 55.21% 1,815 44.35% 18 0.44% 4,092 39.84%
Coosa 1,415 42.71% 1,867 56.39% 30 0.91% 3,312 41.42%
Covington 2,107 23.33% 6,835 75.69% 88 0.97% 9,030 35.09%
Crenshaw 1,320 35.46% 2,347 63.04% 56 1.50% 3,725 37.66%
Cullman 4,161 19.73% 16,609 78.74% 324 1.54% 21,094 37.61%
Dale 3,844 35.04% 6,991 63.72% 136 1.24% 10,971 34.87%
Dallas 10,503 74.75% 3,487 24.82% 60 0.43% 14,050 44.88%
DeKalb 3,559 25.62% 10,097 72.69% 234 1.68% 13,890 34.31%
Elmore 7,711 34.33% 14,415 64.16% 338 1.50% 22,464 41.34%
Escambia 3,642 41.78% 4,987 57.22% 87 1.00% 8,716 35.39%
Etowah 10,568 40.34% 15,730 60.04% 620 2.37% 26,918 38.57%
Fayette 1,143 24.39% 3,491 74.55% 50 1.07% 4,684 38.40%
Franklin 1,771 29.34% 4,216 69.86% 48 0.80% 6,035 33.50%
Geneva 1,290 18.92% 5,433 79.72% 93 1.37% 6,816 37.84%
Greene 3,345 87.64% 462 12.12% 9 0.24% 3,816 53.89%
Hale 3,902 69.33% 1,691 30.11% 32 0.57% 5,625 46.26%
Henry 1,899 38.32% 3,015 60.91% 38 0.77% 4,952 39.20%
Houston 9,198 37.81% 14,846 61.02% 285 1.17% 24,329 34.18%
Jackson 3,330 30.82% 7,317 67.75% 154 1.43% 10,801 29.44%
Jefferson 149,759 68.13% 66,350 30.18% 3,716 1.69% 219,825 47.38%
Lamar 779 21.31% 2,847 77.89% 29 0.79% 3,655 34.46%
Lauderdale 9,970 43.02% 12,818 55.31% 388 1.67% 23,176 37.53%
Lawrence 3,033 36.04% 5,321 63.23% 61 0.72% 8,415 35.49%
Lee 19,886 57.61% 14,059 40.73% 674 1.95% 34,519 32.90%
Limestone 9,606 39.19% 14,298 58.33% 515 2.10% 24,514 41.18%
Lowndes 3,783 79.08% 988 20.65% 13 0.27% 4,784 47.14%
Macon 5,783 88.14% 759 11.56% 20 0.30% 6,567 37.70%
Madison 65,997 56.98% 46,381 40.04% 3,447 2.98% 115,825 45.68%
Marengo 4,498 61.11% 2,805 38.11% 62 0.84% 7,361 46.01%
Marion 1,311 19.72% 5,269 79.25% 68 1.02% 6,647 32.82%
Marshall 5,145 26.47% 13,842 71.21% 450 2.32% 19,437 34.22%
Mobile 62,716 56.46% 46,828 42.15% 1,546 1.39% 111,090 38.55%
Monroe 3,266 49.59% 3,280 49.80% 40 0.61% 6,586 40.79%
Montgomery 48,374 72.35% 17,739 26.53% 745 1.11% 66,858 44.05%
Morgan 10,935 35.48% 19,215 62.34% 671 2.18% 30,821 40.28%
Perry 3,140 79.04% 821 20.68% 11 0.28% 3,972 48.70%
Pickens 3,064 50.44% 2,965 48.81% 46 0.76% 6,075 44.18%
Pike 4,015 48.51% 4,165 50.32% 97 1.17% 8,277 37.58%
Randolph 1,695 34.25% 3,231 65.29% 23 0.46% 4,949 29.66%
Russell 6,761 64.77% 3,622 34.70% 55 0.53% 10,438 28.52%
Shelby 27,311 41.71% 36,455 55.67% 1,718 2.62% 65,484 45.63%
St. Clair 6,212 27.43% 15,889 70.15% 459 2.03% 22,560 38.05%
Sumter 3,527 80.91% 814 18.67% 18 0.41% 4,359 43.95%
Talladega 9,977 50.13% 9,701 48.75% 223 1.12% 19,901 37.45%
Tallapoosa 4,605 38.59% 7,179 60.16% 150 1.26% 11,934 40.19%
Tuscaloosa 30,869 57.23% 22,067 40.91% 1,007 1.87% 53,943 40.83%
Walker 4,330 26.20% 11,938 72.23% 259 1.57% 16,527 35.19%
Washington 1,805 34.86% 3,325 64.21% 48 0.93% 5,178 39.78%
Wilcox 3,345 76.74% 1,000 22.94% 16 0.37% 4,359 46.94%
Winston 911 16.10% 4,681 82.71% 67 1.18% 5,659 35.80%
Totals 673,896 49.97% 651,972 48.34% 22,852 1.69% 1,348,720 100.00%

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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