Scotland women's national football team

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Scotland
AssociationScottish Football Association
ConfederationUEFA (Europe)
Head coachShelley Kerr
CaptainRachel Corsie[1]
Most capsGemma Fay (203)[2]
Top scorerJulie Fleeting (116)
FIFA codeSCO
First colours
Second colours
FIFA ranking
Current 22 Decrease 2 (12 July 2019)[3]
Highest19[4] (March 2014; September 2018)
Lowest31[4] (March 2004)
First international
 Scotland 2–3 England 
(Greenock, Scotland; 18 November 1972)[5][6][7]
Biggest win
 Scotland 17–0 Lithuania 
(Glasgow, Scotland; 30 May 1998)[8]
Biggest defeat
 England 8–0 Scotland 
(Nuneaton, England; 23 June 1973)[9]
World Cup
Appearances1 (first in 2019)
Best resultGroup stage (2019)
European Championship
Appearances1 (first in 2017)
Best resultGroup stage (2017)

The Scotland women's national football team represents Scotland in international women's football competitions. Since 1998, the team has been governed by the Scottish Football Association (SFA). Scotland qualified for the FIFA Women's World Cup for the first time in 2019, and qualified for their first UEFA Women's Euro in 2017. As of July 2019, the team was 22nd in the FIFA Women's World Rankings.

History[edit]

Church documents recorded women playing football in Carstairs, Lanarkshire, in 1628.[10] Scotland first played a women's international match in May 1881.[10] Women's football struggled for recognition during this early period and was banned by the football authorities in 1921.[10] Club sides who were interested in using their grounds for women's football were subsequently denied permission by the Scottish Football Association (SFA).[10] The sport continued on an unofficial basis until the 1970s, when the ban was lifted.[10] In 1971 UEFA instructed its members to take control of women's football within their territories. The motion was passed 31–1, but Scotland was the only member to vote against it.[11] Football in Scotland has traditionally been seen as a working class and male preserve.[12]

Scotland's first official match, a 3–2 defeat to England, took place in November 1972.[5][6][7] The team was managed by Rab Stewart. The 1921 ban on women's football was lifted in 1974, and the SFA assumed direct responsibility for Scottish women's football in 1998.[12] Scotland have participated in most international competitions since the ban was removed. The team's standing has improved significantly in recent years, reaching an all-time high of 19th place in the FIFA Women's World Rankings in March 2014.[4][13][14] They reached their first major tournament finals when they qualified for UEFA Women's Euro 2017.[15] The team followed this up by qualifying for their first World Cup finals tournament in 2019.[16] Following their qualification, the Scottish Government announced they would provide funding to allow all the players to train full time in the lead up to the World Cup, a welcome announcement as several players do not play professionally.[17] Their final home match (against Jamaica) before the 2019 World Cup saw a record attendance for the national team of 18,555.[18]

Claire Emslie scored Scotland's first World Cup goal, netting in their 2019 opener against England on 9 June.[19] After losing their second game, 2–1 against Japan, Scotland needed to win their third game against Argentina to qualify for the last 16 as a third-placed team.[20] They appeared to be heading for qualification when they took a 3–0 lead, but they conceded three late goals to draw 3–3 and exited at the group stage.[20]

Record[edit]

Scotland playing a 2015 World Cup qualifying match in Sweden

World Cup[edit]

Year Final Tournament Qualification
Round Pld W D L F A Round Pld W D L F A
1991 Did not enter
1995 Did not qualify Group – 4th[21] 6 0 0 6 3 22
1999 Unable to qualify[22]
2003
2007 Did not qualify Group – 3rd 8 2 2 4 4 20
2011 Group – 2nd 8 6 1 1 24 5
2015 Play-offs 12 8 0 4 38 12
2019 Group – 4th 3 0 1 2 5 7 Group – 1st 8 7 0 1 19 7
Total 1/8 3 0 1 2 5 7 42 23 3 16 88 66
*Draws include knockout matches decided on penalty kicks.
FIFA Women's World Cup history
Year Round Date Opponent Result Stadium
France 2019 Group stage 9 June  England L 1–2 Allianz Riviera, Nice
14 June  Japan L 1–2 Roazhon Park, Rennes
19 June  Argentina D 3–3 Parc des Princes, Paris

Olympics[edit]

At the Olympic Games the International Olympic Committee charter only permit a Great Britain team, representing the whole of the United Kingdom, to compete.[23] As London hosted the 2012 Summer Olympics, a Great Britain team was entered and two Scotland players (Kim Little and Ifeoma Dieke) were selected for the squad.[24][25]

The (English) FA indicated in June 2013 that they would be prepared to run women's teams at future Olympic tournaments, subject to one of the home nations meeting the qualification criteria (i.e. being one of the top three European nations at the Women's World Cup).[26] Following objections from the Scottish, Welsh and Northern Irish football associations, and a commitment from FIFA that they would not allow entry of a British team unless all four Home Nations agreed, the FA said they would not seek entry into the 2016 tournament.[27] An agreement was reached between the four associations ahead of the 2020 tournament, and qualification was secured by England reaching the semi-finals of the 2019 World Cup.[28]

European Championship[edit]

Year Final Tournament Qualification
Round Pld W D L F A Round Pld W D L F A
1984 Did not qualify Group – 2nd 6 3 1 2 9 8
1987 Group – 2nd 6 4 0 2 24 10
1989 Group – Withdrew
1991 Did not enter
1993 Did not qualify Group – 3rd 4 0 1 3 1 5
1995 Group – 4th 6 0 0 6 3 22
1997 Unable to qualify[29]
2001
2005 Did not qualify Group – 3rd 8 4 0 4 19 16
2009 Play-offs 10 4 1 5 19 11
2013 Play-offs 10 5 2 3 24 16
2017 Group – 3rd 3 1 0 2 2 8 Group – 2nd 8 7 0 1 30 7
2021 Qualification in progress Group E 1 1 0 0 8 0
Totals 1/12 3 1 0 2 2 8 59 28 5 26 137 95
UEFA Women's Championship history
Year Round Date Opponent Result Stadium
Netherlands 2017 Group stage 19 July  England L 0–6 Stadion Galgenwaard, Utrecht
23 July  Portugal L 1–2 Sparta Stadion, Rotterdam
27 July  Spain W 1–0 De Adelaarshorst, Deventer

Unofficial competition[edit]

  • World Cup
  • European Competition

Other tournaments[edit]

Year Competition Result GP W D* L GS GA Ref
England 1976 Three Nations Championship 2nd 2 1 0 1 3 6
Italy 1979 European Competition Group 2 0 1 1 0 2 [35]
Bulgaria 1992 Varna Tournament 7th 3 2 0 1 5 2 [36]
Bulgaria 1999 Albena Cup 2nd 5 1 3 1 9 7 [37]
Bulgaria 2000 Albena Cup 5th 4 2 1 1 10 5 [38]
Northern Ireland 2000 Celt Cup 3rd 2 1 0 1 27 1 [39]
Netherlands 2000 Veenendal Tournament 3rd 2 0 1 1 3 5 [40]
Portugal 2002 Algarve Cup 10th 4 2 0 2 4 8 [41]
Italy 2006 Torneo Regione Molise 3rd 2 0 0 2 0 8 [42]
Cyprus 2008 Cyprus Cup 6th 4 1 0 3 5 5 [43]
Cyprus 2009 Cyprus Cup 7th 4 1 0 3 2 8
Cyprus 2010 Cyprus Cup 7th 4 1 0 3 3 10
Cyprus 2011 Cyprus Cup 4th 4 1 1 2 2 4
Cyprus 2012 Cyprus Cup 9th 4 2 0 2 6 8
Cyprus 2013 Cyprus Cup 5th 4 2 1 1 7 6
Brazil 2013 Brazilian Invitational 4th 4 0 0 4 4 10 [44]
Cyprus 2014 Cyprus Cup 4th 4 2 2 0 10 7
Cyprus 2015 Cyprus Cup 7th 4 2 0 2 7 7
Cyprus 2017 Cyprus Cup 5th 4 2 1 1 6 5
Portugal 2019 Algarve Cup 5th 3 2 0 1 5 2 [45]
Total 69 25 11 33 118 116
*Draws include knockout matches decided on penalty kicks.

Media coverage[edit]

Scotland women's internationals have been televised by BBC Alba and broadcast by BBC Radio Scotland.[46] BBC Radio Scotland presenter Tam Cowan was temporarily taken off the air in 2013, after he criticised the use of Fir Park for women's internationals in his Daily Record column.[47] In a November 2013 interview with The Independent newspaper, Laura Montgomery of Glasgow City FC suggested that media coverage of women's football in Scotland often reflected sexist and misogynist attitudes. This is due to a preponderance of "stupid male journalists", according to Montgomery.[48]

Stadium[edit]

Ravenscraig Stadium hosted the first official match played by the Scotland women's team, in November 1972.

The first official match played by the Scotland women's team was hosted by the Ravenscraig Stadium, an athletics facility in Greenock.[5][6] The team now normally plays its home games at (men's) club stadiums. Venues used in recent years include Fir Park in Motherwell, Tynecastle Park and Easter Road in Edinburgh, and St Mirren Park in Paisley.[47][49]

Hampden Park in Glasgow is the traditional home of the men's national team and is described by the Scottish Football Association as the National Stadium.[50] A Scotland women's international was played at Hampden for the first time in October 2012, when it hosted the first leg of a European Championship qualifying playoff against Spain.[51] Earlier in 2012, Hampden had hosted matches in the Olympic women's football tournament. In May 2019 the team attracted a record attendance for a women's football match in Scotland, when 18,555 were present at Hampden for a World Cup warm-up friendly with Jamaica.[18]

Players[edit]

Current squad[edit]

The following players were named to the squad for a UEFA Women's Euro 2021 qualifying match with Cyprus in August 2019.[52][53][54][55]

Caps and goals are current as of the match played on 30 August 2019 against Cyprus.

No. Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club
1GK Lee Alexander (1991-09-23) 23 September 1991 (age 27) 21 0 Scotland Glasgow City
1GK Jenna Fife (1995-12-01) 1 December 1995 (age 23) 4 0 Scotland Hibernian
1GK Shannon Lynn (1985-10-22) 22 October 1985 (age 33) 30 0 Sweden Vittsjö

2DF Chloe Arthur (1995-01-21) 21 January 1995 (age 24) 20 0 England Birmingham City
2DF Jennifer Beattie (1991-05-13) 13 May 1991 (age 28) 128 23 England Arsenal
2DF Rachel Corsie (captain) (1989-08-17) 17 August 1989 (age 30) 113 16 United States Utah Royals
2DF Nicola Docherty (1992-08-23) 23 August 1992 (age 27) 21 0 Scotland Glasgow City
2DF Sophie Howard (1993-09-17) 17 September 1993 (age 26) 16 1 England Reading
2DF Hayley Lauder (1990-06-04) 4 June 1990 (age 29) 101 9 Scotland Glasgow City
2DF Rachel McLauchlan (1997-07-07) 7 July 1997 (age 22) 7 0 Scotland Glasgow City
2DF Joelle Murray (1986-11-07) 7 November 1986 (age 32) 48 1 Scotland Hibernian
2DF Kirsty Smith (1994-01-06) 6 January 1994 (age 25) 39 0 England Manchester United

3MF Lizzie Arnot (1996-03-01) 1 March 1996 (age 23) 29 2 England Manchester United
3MF Leanne Crichton (1987-08-06) 6 August 1987 (age 32) 65 3 Scotland Glasgow City
3MF Lucy Graham (1996-10-10) 10 October 1996 (age 22) 3 0 England Everton
3MF Samantha Kerr (1999-04-17) 17 April 1999 (age 20) 0 0 Scotland Glasgow City
3MF Kim Little (vice-captain) (1990-06-29) 29 June 1990 (age 29) 137 59 England Arsenal
3MF Joanne Love (1985-12-06) 6 December 1985 (age 33) 191 13 Scotland Glasgow City
3MF Caroline Weir (1995-06-20) 20 June 1995 (age 24) 67 9 England Manchester City

4FW Claire Emslie (1994-03-08) 8 March 1994 (age 25) 25 5 United States Orlando Pride
4FW Lisa Evans (1992-05-21) 21 May 1992 (age 27) 82 17 England Arsenal
4FW Abbi Grant (1995-12-11) 11 December 1995 (age 23) 3 0 England Birmingham City
4FW Abi Harrison (1997-12-07) 7 December 1997 (age 21) 3 0 England Bristol City
4FW Jamie-Lee Napier (2000-04-06) 6 April 2000 (age 19) 0 0 Scotland Hibernian
4FW Zoe Ness (1996-03-24) 24 March 1996 (age 23) 9 1 England Lewes
4FW Jane Ross (1989-09-18) 18 September 1989 (age 30) 129 59 England Manchester United

Recent players[edit]

The following players have been selected by Scotland within the past 12 months.

Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club Latest call-up
GK Rachel Harrison (1989-10-11) 11 October 1989 (age 29) 0 0 Scotland Spartans v.  Iceland, 21 January 2019

DF Frankie Brown (1987-10-08) 8 October 1987 (age 31) 96 0 England Bristol City 2019 Algarve Cup
DF Emma Mitchell (1992-09-19) 19 September 1992 (age 27) 59 7 England Arsenal 2019 Algarve Cup INJ

MF Amy Muir (2000-03-07) 7 March 2000 (age 19) 0 0 Scotland Hibernian v.  Cyprus, 30 August 2019 INJ
MF Christie Murray (1990-05-03) 3 May 1990 (age 29) 62 4 England Liverpool 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup

FW Fiona Brown (1995-03-31) 31 March 1995 (age 24) 39 2 Sweden Rosengård v.  Cyprus, 30 August 2019 INJ
FW Erin Cuthbert (1998-07-19) 19 July 1998 (age 21) 33 11 England Chelsea v.  Cyprus, 30 August 2019 INJ
FW Lana Clelland (1993-01-26) 26 January 1993 (age 26) 26 4 Italy Fiorentina 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup

Notes:

  • INJ = Withdrew from the squad due to injury

Honoured players[edit]

The SFA operates a roll of honour for every female player who has made more than 100 appearances for Scotland.[56] The Scottish Football Museum operates a hall of fame, based at Hampden Park, which is open to players and managers involved in Scottish football.[57] Rose Reilly (2007) and Julie Fleeting (2018) are the only women to be inducted so far. Sportscotland operates the Scottish Sports Hall of Fame, which has inducted some footballers, also including Reilly.

Recent results and forthcoming fixtures[edit]

2019 FIFA Women's World Cup qualification[edit]

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Scotland 8 7 0 1 19 7 +12 21 2019 FIFA Women's World Cup
2   Switzerland 8 6 1 1 21 5 +16 19 Play-offs
3  Poland 8 3 2 3 16 12 +4 11
4  Albania 8 1 1 6 6 22 −16 4
5  Belarus 8 1 0 7 5 21 −16 3
Source: UEFA
Rules for classification: Qualification tiebreakers

2019 FIFA Women's World Cup[edit]

Scotland were drawn in Group D.[58]

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  England 3 3 0 0 5 1 +4 9 Advance to knockout stage
2  Japan 3 1 1 1 2 3 −1 4
3  Argentina 3 0 2 1 3 4 −1 2
4  Scotland 3 0 1 2 5 7 −2 1
Source: FIFA
Rules for classification: Tiebreakers

UEFA Women's Euro 2021 qualifying[edit]

Scotland were drawn in Group E.[59]

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Scotland 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Final tournament
2  Finland 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Final tournament if among three best runners-up
(Play-offs otherwise)
3  Portugal 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
4  Albania 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
5  Cyprus 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
First match(es) will be played on 2019. Source: UEFA
Rules for classification: Qualification tiebreakers

Coaching staff[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Corsie to lead Scotland Women's National Team". Scottish Football Association. 10 September 2017. Retrieved 10 September 2017.
  2. ^ "Scotland captain Fay announces international retirement". Scottish Football Association. 22 August 2017. Retrieved 22 August 2017.
  3. ^ "The FIFA/Coca-Cola Women's World Ranking". FIFA. 12 July 2019. Retrieved 12 July 2019.
  4. ^ a b c "Scotland". FIFA. Retrieved 10 April 2014.
  5. ^ a b c Rose Reilly says Scotland caps 'better late than never' after 1972 match against England, BBC Sport, 27 May 2019
  6. ^ a b c How Scotland's first women's football team made history to battle the Auld Enemy, Daily Record, 16 December 2018
  7. ^ a b The history of women's football, The Football Association
  8. ^ Travers, Raymond (1 June 1998). "Heaven 17 for flower of Scotland". The Scotsman. Archived from the original on 11 June 2014. Retrieved 13 December 2011. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  9. ^ England 8–0 Scotland, England Lionesses
  10. ^ a b c d e "The Honeyballers: Women who fought to play football". BBC News. BBC. 26 September 2013. Retrieved 5 December 2013.
  11. ^ Gregory, Patricia (3 June 2005). "How women's football battled for survival". BBC Sport. Retrieved 5 December 2013.
  12. ^ a b MacBeth, Jessica (Spring 2008). "Attitudes towards women's football in Scottish society" (PDF) (63). Scottish Affairs. Retrieved 5 December 2013. Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  13. ^ "FIFA/Coca-Cola Women's World Ranking". FIFA. Retrieved 10 April 2014.
  14. ^ "USA close on records, Sweden outjump France". FIFA. 21 June 2013. Retrieved 25 June 2013.
  15. ^ Wilson, Richard (10 January 2017). "Scotland: Anna Signeul urges players to fight for Euro 2017 places". BBC Sport. Retrieved 2 April 2017.
  16. ^ MacBeath, Amy (4 September 2018). "Albania Women 1–2 Scotland Women". BBC Sport. Retrieved 4 September 2018.
  17. ^ "Scotland Women: All players to be full-time up to World Cup with Government funding". 26 September 2018. Retrieved 11 June 2019.
  18. ^ a b Lindsay, Clive (28 May 2019). "Scotland Women 3–2 Jamaica Women". BBC Sport. Retrieved 28 May 2019.
  19. ^ Dean, Tom (10 June 2019). "Scoring Scotland's first World Cup goal a dream for Claire Emslie". The Scotsman. Retrieved 11 June 2019.
  20. ^ a b English, Tom (20 June 2019). "Women's World Cup: 'Scotland must face capitulation truth'". BBC Sport. Retrieved 23 June 2019.
  21. ^ The European Championship acted as a qualification tournament for the World Cup.
  22. ^ Scotland were in "Class B" of European qualification and were therefore unable to earn qualification for the World Cup finals.
  23. ^ Bell, Dan (21 May 2007). "Salmond aims for Scottish Olympic gold". The Guardian. London: Guardian News and Media Limited. Retrieved 4 September 2011.
  24. ^ "SQUAD OF 18 WOMEN'S FOOTBALLERS SELECTED FOR TEAM GB". Team GB. 26 June 2012. Retrieved 17 February 2015.
  25. ^ Silverman, Rosa (27 July 2012). "London 2012 Olympics: Team GB athletes in National Anthem singing row". The Telegraph. Retrieved 17 February 2015.
  26. ^ "GB women's football team could compete at Rio Olympics". BBC Sport. 26 June 2013. Retrieved 5 July 2013.
  27. ^ "Rio 2016: FA scraps plans for Great Britain football teams". BBC Sport. 30 March 2015.
  28. ^ "Tokyo 2020 Olympics: Home nations agree to GB women's football team". BBC Sport. 1 October 2018. Retrieved 1 October 2018.
  29. ^ Scotland were in "Class B" of European qualification and were therefore unable to earn qualification for the European Championship finals.
  30. ^ Coppa del Mondo (Women) 1970 rsssf.com. Retrieved 12 March 2014.
  31. ^ Mundial (Women) 1971 rsssf.com. Retrieved 12 March 2014.
  32. ^ a b c d Women's World Invitation Tournament – Overview (1978–1987) rsssf.com. Retrieved 12 March 2014.
  33. ^ Coppa Europa per Nazioni (Women) 1969 rsssf.com. Retrieved 12 March 2014.
  34. ^ Inofficial European Women Championship 1979 rsssf.com. Retrieved 12 March 2014.
  35. ^ Unofficial European Championship 1979 rsssf.com. Retrieved 19 October 2013
  36. ^ Varna Tournament 1992 rsssf.com. Retrieved 19 October 2013.
  37. ^ Albena Cup 1999 rsssf.com. Retrieved 19 October 2013.
  38. ^ Albena Cup 2000 rsssf.com. Retrieved 19 October 2013.
  39. ^ Celt Cup 2000 rsssf.com. Retrieved 19 October 2013.
  40. ^ Veenendaal Tournament 2000 rsssf.com. Retrieved 19 October 2013.
  41. ^ Algarve Cup 2002 rsssf.com. Retrieved 13 October 2013.
  42. ^ Torneo Regione Molise 2006 rsssf.com. Retrieved 19 October 2013.
  43. ^ Cyprus Cup 2008 rsssf.com. Retrieved 19 October 2013.
  44. ^ 2013 Brazil Invitational Tournament scottishfa.co.uk. 22 December 2013. Retrieved 11 March 2014.
  45. ^ Lamont, Alasdair (6 March 2019). "Scotland 1–0 Denmark: Jane Ross goal secures win in final Algarve Cup match". BBC Sport. Retrieved 7 March 2019.
  46. ^ "Scotland women's World Cup games live on BBC Alba". BBC Sport. 3 September 2013. Retrieved 5 December 2013.
  47. ^ a b McLaughlin, Martyn (29 September 2013). "Tam Cowan off air over women's football comments". The Scotsman. Johnston Publishing. Retrieved 5 December 2013.
  48. ^ Scott-Elliot, Robin (11 November 2013). "Glasgow City's Laura Montgomery: 'We still face negative views on women in sport'". The Independent. London. Retrieved 7 December 2013.
  49. ^ "Scotland's women smash eight past Israel". BBC Sport. 16 June 2012. Retrieved 5 December 2013.
  50. ^ "Hampden Park". Scottish Tourist Board. Archived from the original on 7 October 2008. Retrieved 15 September 2008. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  51. ^ Mann, Charlie (20 October 2012). "Scotland Women 1–1 Spain Women". BBC Sport. Retrieved 5 December 2013.
  52. ^ @ScotlandNT (15 August 2019). "Shelley Kerr has announced her first squad since the World Cup for our home UEFA Women's EURO 2021 Qualifier against Cyprus" (Tweet). Retrieved 15 August 2019 – via Twitter.
  53. ^ "Scotland name settled squad for Cyprus in Euro 2021 qualifying opener". BBC Sport. 15 August 2019. Retrieved 15 August 2019.
  54. ^ "Scotland Women: Erin Cuthbert and Fiona Brown miss Euro opener with Cyprus". BBC Sport. 25 August 2019. Retrieved 25 August 2019.
  55. ^ Southwick, Andrew (26 August 2019). "Amy Muir withdraws from the Scotland squad a day after first call-up". BBC Sport. Retrieved 26 August 2019.
  56. ^ "Women's International Roll of Honour unveiled". Scottish Football Association. Retrieved 23 October 2018.
  57. ^ "Scottish Football Hall of Fame Dinner 2013, Celebrating 10 years of the Scottish Football Hall of Fame". Scottish Football Museum. Archived from the original on 10 November 2013. Retrieved 15 November 2013. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  58. ^ Taylor, Louise (8 December 2018). "England and Scotland to meet in their Women's World Cup opener". The Observer. Retrieved 28 May 2019.
  59. ^ "Women's Euro 2021 qualifiers: Scotland face former coach Anna Signeul's Finland". BBC Sport. 21 February 2019. Retrieved 22 February 2019.

External links[edit]