180 nanometer

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The 180 nanometer (180 nm) process refers to the level of semiconductor process technology that was reached around the 1998–2000 timeframe by leading semiconductor companies like TSMC,[1] Fujitsu,[2] Sony, Toshiba,[3] Intel, AMD, Texas Instruments and IBM.

The origin of the 180 nm value is historical, as it reflects a trend of 70% scaling every 2–3 years. The naming is formally determined by the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS).

Some of the first CPUs manufactured with this process include Intel Coppermine family of Pentium III processors. This was the first technology using a gate length shorter than that of light used for lithography (which has a minimum of 193 nm).

Some more recent microprocessors and microcontrollers (e.g. PIC) are using this technology because it is typically low cost and does not require upgrading of existing equipment.

Processors using 180 nm manufacturing technology[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "0.18-micron Technology". TSMC. Retrieved 30 June 2019.
  2. ^ 65nm CMOS Process Technology
  3. ^ a b "EMOTION ENGINE® AND GRAPHICS SYNTHESIZER USED IN THE CORE OF PLAYSTATION® BECOME ONE CHIP" (PDF). Sony. April 21, 2003. Retrieved 26 June 2019.


Preceded by
250 nm
CMOS manufacturing processes Succeeded by
130 nm