1818 Pennsylvania's 6th congressional district special elections

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

During the 15th Congress, there were two special elections in the 6th district of Pennsylvania, both held in the year 1818. The 6th district at that time was a plural district with two seats, both of which became vacant at different times in 1818. The first vacancy was caused by John Ross (DR) resigning on February 24, 1818[1] and the second was caused by Samuel D. Ingham (DR) resigning July 6.[2]

March election[edit]

The first election, to fill the vacancy left by Ross' resignation, was held March 3.

Candidate Party Votes[3][4] Percent
Thomas J. Rogers Democratic-Republican 2,926 93.0%
Samuel Sitgreaves Federalist 220 7.0%

Rogers took his seat March 24,[5] during the First Session

October election[edit]

The second election, to fill the vacancy left by Ingham's resignation, was held October 13, the same time as the elections for the 16th Congress

Candidate Party Votes[3] Percent
Samuel Moore Democratic-Republican 3,936 100%

Moore ran unopposed and took his seat November 16,[6] at the start of the Second Session of the 15th Congress.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Fifteenth Congress March 4, 1817, to March 3, 1819". Office of the Historian, United States House of Representatives. Retrieved November 2, 2018 – via History.house.gov., footnote 40
  2. ^ "Fifteenth Congress March 4, 1817, to March 3, 1819". Office of the Historian, United States House of Representatives. Retrieved November 2, 2018 – via History.house.gov., footnote 38
  3. ^ a b http://staffweb.wilkes.edu/harold.cox/rep/Congress%201816.pdf
  4. ^ "Pennsylvania 1818 U.S. House of Representatives, District 6, Special". Tufts Digital Collations and Archives. A New Nation Votes: American Election Returns 1787–1825. Tufts University. Retrieved January 24, 2019.
  5. ^ "Fifteenth Congress March 4, 1817, to March 3, 1819". Office of the Historian, United States House of Representatives. Retrieved November 2, 2018 – via History.house.gov., footnote 41
  6. ^ "Fifteenth Congress March 4, 1817, to March 3, 1819". Office of the Historian, United States House of Representatives. Retrieved November 2, 2018 – via History.house.gov., footnote 39