1964 United States elections

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1964 United States elections
Presidential election year
Election dayNovember 3
Incumbent presidentLyndon B. Johnson (Democratic)
Next Congress89th
Presidential election
Partisan controlDemocratic Hold
Popular vote marginDemocratic +22.6%
Electoral vote
Lyndon B. Johnson (D)486
Barry Goldwater (R)52
1964 United States presidential election in California1964 United States presidential election in Oregon1964 United States presidential election in Washington (state)1964 United States presidential election in Idaho1964 United States presidential election in Nevada1964 United States presidential election in Utah1964 United States presidential election in Arizona1964 United States presidential election in Montana1964 United States presidential election in Wyoming1964 United States presidential election in Colorado1964 United States presidential election in New Mexico1964 United States presidential election in North Dakota1964 United States presidential election in South Dakota1964 United States presidential election in Nebraska1964 United States presidential election in Kansas1964 United States presidential election in Oklahoma1964 United States presidential election in Texas1964 United States presidential election in Minnesota1964 United States presidential election in Iowa1964 United States presidential election in Missouri1964 United States presidential election in Arkansas1964 United States presidential election in Louisiana1964 United States presidential election in Wisconsin1964 United States presidential election in Illinois1964 United States presidential election in Michigan1964 United States presidential election in Indiana1964 United States presidential election in Ohio1964 United States presidential election in Kentucky1964 United States presidential election in Tennessee1964 United States presidential election in Mississippi1964 United States presidential election in Alabama1964 United States presidential election in Georgia1964 United States presidential election in Florida1964 United States presidential election in South Carolina1964 United States presidential election in North Carolina1964 United States presidential election in Virginia1964 United States presidential election in West Virginia1964 United States presidential election in the District of Columbia1964 United States presidential election in Maryland1964 United States presidential election in Delaware1964 United States presidential election in Pennsylvania1964 United States presidential election in New Jersey1964 United States presidential election in New York1964 United States presidential election in Connecticut1964 United States presidential election in Rhode Island1964 United States presidential election in Vermont1964 United States presidential election in New Hampshire1964 United States presidential election in Maine1964 United States presidential election in Massachusetts1964 United States presidential election in Hawaii1964 United States presidential election in Alaska1964 United States presidential election in the District of Columbia1964 United States presidential election in Maryland1964 United States presidential election in Delaware1964 United States presidential election in New Jersey1964 United States presidential election in Connecticut1964 United States presidential election in Rhode Island1964 United States presidential election in Massachusetts1964 United States presidential election in Vermont1964 United States presidential election in New HampshireElectoralCollege1964.svg
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1964 presidential election results. Red denotes states won by Goldwater, blue denotes states won by Johnson. Numbers indicate the electoral votes won by each candidate.
Senate elections
Overall controlDemocratic Hold
Seats contested35 of 100 seats
(33 Class 2 seats + 3 special elections)[1]
Net seat changeDemocratic +2
Us 1964 senate election map.svg
1964 Senate results

  Democratic gain   Democratic hold
  Republican gain   Republican hold

House elections
Overall controlDemocratic Hold
Seats contestedAll 435 voting members
Popular vote marginDemocratic +14.7%
Net seat changeDemocratic +37
1964 United States House Elections.png
1964 House of Representatives results

  Democratic gain   Democratic hold
  Republican gain   Republican hold

Gubernatorial elections
Seats contested25
Net seat changeRepublican +1
USgubernatorial1964.png
1964 gubernatorial election results

  Democratic gain   Democratic hold
  Republican gain   Republican hold

The 1964 United States Elections were held on November 3, and elected the members of the 89th United States Congress, as well as the 45th Presidential Election. The Democratic party retained the presidency and added to their majorities in both chambers of Congress. This was the first presidential election after the ratification of the 23rd Amendment, which granted electoral votes to Washington, D.C.[2]

Democratic incumbent President Lyndon B. Johnson (who took office on November 22, 1963, upon the death of his predecessor, John F. Kennedy) won a full term, defeating Republican Senator Barry Goldwater from Arizona.[3] Johnson won every state except for Arizona and the Deep South. Johnson won 61% of the popular vote, the largest share of the popular vote since 1820. Goldwater won the Republican nomination on the first ballot, defeating Governor William Scranton of Pennsylvania and Governor Nelson Rockefeller of New York.

The Democratic Party picked up 37 seats in the House and 2 seats in the Senate, thereby capturing veto-proof supermajorities in both chambers.

In the gubernatorial elections, the Republican Party won a net gain of one seat.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ The Class 1 Senate seat in New Mexico held concurrent regular and special elections. That special election is not counted as part of the "seats contested."
  2. ^ "Statistics of the Presidential and Congressional Election of November 3, 1964" (PDF). U.S. House of Reps, Office of the Clerk. Retrieved 10 April 2017.
  3. ^ "1964 Presidential Election". The American Presidency Project. Retrieved 26 December 2011.