1965 California Angels season

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

1965 California Angels
Known as Los Angeles Angels
until September 2, 1965
Major League affiliations
Location
Other information
Owner(s)Gene Autry
General manager(s)Fred Haney
Manager(s)Bill Rigney
Local televisionKTLA
Local radioKMPC
(Buddy Blattner, Don Wells, Steve Bailey)
< Previous season     Next season >

The 1965 California Angels season was the fifth year of play for the American Major League Baseball franchise. The 1965 Angels finished seventh in the American League with a record of 75 wins and 87 losses, putting them 27 games behind the AL Champion Minnesota Twins. It was also the final season for the franchise in the city of Los Angeles before moving to their new stadium in nearby Anaheim for the following season. In their fourth and last year as tenants at Chávez Ravine, the Angels drew only 566,727 fans[1], eighth in the ten-team Junior Circuit and almost two million fans fewer than their landlords, the Dodgers, who were en route to the 1965 world championship.

Midseason name change[edit]

The 1965 Angels are the only team in 20th century Major League Baseball history[2][3] to undergo an in-season name change.[4] The club began the season under its original identity, the Los Angeles Angels, but with the imminent move to Anaheim, owner Gene Autry changed the name of the team to the California Angels — effective immediately — on September 2, 1965, with only 28 games left in the season.[2]

The name change was reflected in the Angels' new caps, on which an interlocking "CA" in fancy block letters replaced the former interlocking "LA". The new caps retained the distinctive white halo around the navy-blue crown. Because the team's home and road uniforms of the time simply read "ANGELS" across the shirtfront, they did not change.

Offseason[edit]

Regular season[edit]

Season standings[edit]

American League W L Pct. GB
Minnesota Twins 102 60 .630 --
Chicago White Sox 95 67 .586 7
Baltimore Orioles 94 68 .580 8
Detroit Tigers 89 73 .549 13
Cleveland Indians 87 75 .537 15
New York Yankees 77 85 .475 25
California Angels 75 87 .463 27
Washington Senators 70 92 .432 32
Boston Red Sox 62 100 .383 40
Kansas City Athletics 59 103 .364 43

Record vs. opponents[edit]

1965 American League Records

Sources: [1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8] [9] [10]
Team BAL BOS CWS CLE DET KC LAA/
CAL
MIN NYY WSH
Baltimore 11–7 9–9 10–8 11–7 11–7 13–5 8–10 13–5 8–10
Boston 7–11 4–14 8–10 6–12 11–7 5–13 1–17 9–9 11–7
Chicago 9–9 14–4 10–8 9–9 13–5 12–6 7–11 8–10 13–5
Cleveland 8–10 10–8 8–10 9–9 9–9 9–9 11–7 12–6 11–7
Detroit 7–11 12–6 9–9 9–9 13–5 10–8 8–10 10–8 11–7
Kansas City 7–11 7–11 5–13 9–9 5–13 5–13 8–10 7–11 6–12
Los Angeles/California 5–13 13–5 6–12 9–9 8–10 13–5 9–9 6–12 6–12
Minnesota 10–8 17–1 11–7 7–11 10–8 10–8 9–9 13–5 15–3
New York 5–13 9–9 10–8 6–12 8–10 11–7 12–6 5–13 11–7
Washington 10–8 7–11 5–13 7–11 7–11 12–6 12–6 3–15 7–11

NOTE: The Los Angeles Angels changed their name to California Angels on September 2, 1965, with the season in progress.


Notable transactions[edit]

Roster[edit]

1965 California Angels
Roster
Pitchers Catchers

Infielders

Outfielders Manager

Coaches

Player stats[edit]

Batting[edit]

Starters by position[edit]

Note: Pos = Position; G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in

Pos Player G AB H Avg. HR RBI
1B Joe Adcock 122 349 84 .241 14 47
2B Bobby Knoop 142 465 125 .269 7 43
SS Jim Fregosi 161 602 167 .277 15 64
LF Willie Smith 136 459 120 .261 14 57
CF José Cardenal 134 512 128 .250 11 57
RF Albie Pearson 122 360 100 .278 4 21

Other batters[edit]

Note: G = Games played; AB = At bats; H = Hits; Avg. = Batting average; HR = Home runs; RBI = Runs batted in

Player G AB H Avg. HR RBI
Vic Power 124 197 51 .259 1 20
Costen Shockley 40 107 20 .187 2 17
Ed Kirkpatrick 19 73 19 .260 3 8
Bob Smith 23 57 13 .228 0 5
Phil Roof 9 22 3 .136 0 0
Jackie Hernández 6 6 2 .333 0 1

Pitching[edit]

Starting pitchers[edit]

Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G IP W L ERA SO
Fred Newman 36 260.2 14 16 2.93 109
Dean Chance 36 225.2 15 10 3.15 164
Marcelino López 35 215.1 14 13 2.93 122

Other pitchers[edit]

Note: G = Games pitched; IP = Innings pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G IP W L ERA SO
George Brunet 41 197 9 11 2.56 141
Rudy May 30 124 4 9 3.92 76
Ken McBride 8 22 0 3 6.14 11

Relief pitchers[edit]

Note: G = Games pitched; W = Wins; L = Losses; SV = Saves; ERA = Earned run average; SO = Strikeouts

Player G W L SV ERA SO
Bob Lee 69 9 7 23 1.92 89
Aubrey Gatewood 46 4 5 0 3.42 37
Ed Sukla 25 2 3 3 4.50 15
Barry Latman 18 1 1 0 2.84 18
Jim Coates 17 2 0 3 3.54 15
Ron Piché 14 0 3 0 6.86 14
Don Lee 10 0 1 0 6.43 12

Farm system[edit]

Level Team League Manager
AAA Seattle Angels Pacific Coast League Bob Lemon
AA El Paso Sun Kings Texas League Chuck Tanner
A San Jose Bees California League Rocky Bridges
A Quad Cities Angels Midwest League Harry Dunlop and Ken Blackman
Rookie Idaho Falls Angels Pioneer League Fred Koenig

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Baseball Reference: 1965 Miscellaneous Team Information
  2. ^ a b Babicz, Martin C.; Zeiler, Thomas W. (2017). National Pastime: U.S. History Through Baseball. Lanham, Maryland; Boulder, Colorado; New York; London: Rowman & Littlefield. p. 144. ISBN 978-1-4422-3584-7.
  3. ^ United Press International (September 3, 1965). "Los Angeles Angels Now California Angels". The New York Times. Retrieved October 15, 2017.
  4. ^ Baseball Almanac
  5. ^ a b Phil Roof at Baseball-Reference
  6. ^ Bo Belinsky at Baseball-Reference
  7. ^ Bobby Gene Smith at Baseball-Reference
  8. ^ Merritt Ranew at Baseball-Reference
  9. ^ Joe Henderson at Baseball-Reference

References[edit]