1984 Big Ten Conference football season

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1984 Big Ten Conference football season
SportAmerican football
Number of teams10
Top draft pickKevin Allen
ChampionOhio State
Runners-upIllinois, Purdue
Season MVPKeith Byars
Seasons
← 1983
1985 →
1984 Big Ten football standings
Conf     Overall
Team W   L   T     W   L   T
No. 13 Ohio State $ 7 2 0     9 3 0
Illinois 6 3 0     7 4 0
Purdue 6 3 0     7 5 0
No. 16 Iowa 5 3 1     8 4 1
Wisconsin 5 3 1     7 4 1
Michigan State 5 4 0     6 6 0
Michigan 5 4 0     6 6 0
Minnesota 3 6 0     4 7 0
Northwestern 2 7 0     2 9 0
Indiana 0 9 0     0 11 0
  • $ – Conference champion
Rankings from AP Poll

The 1984 Big Ten Conference football season was the 89th season of college football played by the member schools of the Big Ten Conference and was a part of the 1984 NCAA Division I-A football season.

The 1984 Ohio State Buckeyes football team, under head coach Earle Bruce, compiled a 9–3 record, won the Big Ten championship, led the conference in scoring offense (32.6 points per game), lost the 1985 Rose Bowl to USC, and was ranked No. 13 in the final AP poll. Running back Keith Byars set a Big Ten record with 1,764 rushing yards, won the Chicago Tribune Silver Football as the Big Ten's most valuable player, was selected as a consensus All-American, and finished second in the Heisman Trophy voting. Offensive guard Jim Lachey was also selected as a consensus All-American.

The 1984 Iowa Hawkeyes football team, under head coach Hayden Fry, compiled an 8–4–1 record, led the conference in scoring defense (15.5 points allowed per game), defeated Texas in the 1984 Freedom Bowl, and was ranked No. 15 in the final UPI poll. Linebacker Larry Station was a consensus All-American. Chuck Long was the first-team All-Big Ten quarterback and led the conference with a 156.4 passing efficiency rating, and Ronnie Harmon was a first-team All-Big Ten running back.

The 1984 Illinois Fighting Illini football team, under head coach Mike White, compiled a 7–3 record and finished in a tie for second place in the Big Ten. Wide receiver David Williams set Big Ten records with 101 receptions and 1,278 receiving yards and was a consensus All-American.

The 1984 Purdue Boilermakers football team compiled a 7–5 record, tied with Illinois for second place in the Big Ten, and lost to Virginia in the 1984 Peach Bowl. Leon Burtnett was named Big Ten Coach of the Year, and quarterback Jim Everett led the conference with 3,256 passing yards.

Six Big Ten teams played in bowl games, compiling a 1–5 record in those games.

Season overview[edit]

Results and team statistics[edit]

Conf. Rank Team Head coach AP final AP high Overall record Conf. record PPG PAG MVP
1 Ohio State Earle Bruce #13 #2 9–3 7–2 32.6 16.7 Keith Byars
2 (tie) Illinois Mike White NR NR 7–3 6–3 29.4 19.0 David Williams
2 (tie) Purdue Leon Burtnett NR #14 7–5 6–3 23.8 23.6 Jim Everett
4 (tie) Iowa Bob Commings #16 #5 8–4–1 5–3–1 27.6 15.5 Ronnie Harmon
4 (tie) Wisconsin Dave McClain NR #20 7–4–1 5–3–1 20.2 17.2 Al Toon
6 (tie) Michigan Bo Schembechler NR #3 6–6 5–4 17.8 16.7 Mike Mallory
6 (tie) Michigan State George Perles NR NR 6–6 5–4 16.1 16.9 James Morrissey
8 Minnesota Lou Holtz NR NR 4–7 3–6 17.6 28.7 Rickey Foggie
9 Northwestern Dennis Green NR NR 2–9 2–7 12.5 31.7 Keith Cruise
10 Indiana Bill Mallory NR NR 0–11 0–9 16.8 30.7 Joe Fitzgerald

Key
AP final = Team's rank in the final AP Poll of the 1984 season[1]
AP high = Team's highest rank in the AP Poll throughout the 1984 season[1]
PPG = Average of points scored per game; conference leader's average displayed in bold[1]
PAG = Average of points allowed per game; conference leader's average displayed in bold[1]
MVP = Most valuable player as voted by players on each team as part of the voting process to determine the winner of the Chicago Tribune Silver Football trophy; trophy winner in bold[2]

Regular season[edit]

September 1[edit]

On September 1, 1984, the Big Ten football season began with a single conference game.

September 8[edit]

On September 8, 1984, the Big Ten football teams played 10 non-conference games, resulting in eight wins and two losses.

  • Ohio State 22, Oregon State 14. Ohio State (ranked No. 6 in the AP poll) defeated Oregon State, 22–14, before a crowd of 88,072 at Ohio Stadium in Columbus, Ohio. Oregon State led, 14-3, at halftime, but Ohio State scored 19 unanswered points in the second half. Keith Byars rushed for 182 yards and two touchdowns.[5]
  • Illinois 30, Missouri 24. Illinois defeated Missouri, 30–24, before a record crowd of 78,297 in heavy rain at Memorial Stadium in Champaign. Illinois led, 30-17, with two minutes remaining, but Missouri quarterback Marlon Adler threw a 40-yard touchdown pass to George Shorthouse with 1:46 remaining. Missouri's ensuing onside kick failed, but Illinois back Eric Wycoff fumbled two plays later, and Missouri recovered the ball. With 16 seconds left and the ball on the Illinois 23-yard line, Guy Teatfiller sacked Adler, and the clock ran out.[8]
  • Wisconsin 27, Northern Illinois 14.
  • Michigan State 24, Colorado 21.
  • Minnesota 31, Rice 24.
  • Washington 26, Northwestern 0.
  • Duke 31, Indiana 24.

September 15[edit]

On September 15, 1984, the Big Ten teams played 10 non-conference games, resulting in two wins and eight losses.

  • Washington 20, Michigan 11. Michigan (ranked No. 3 in the AP poll) lost to Washington (ranked No. 16), 20–11, before a crowd of 103,072 at Michigan Stadium in Ann Arbor. Jim Harbaugh completed 17 of 37 passes and threw three interceptions. Michigan also fumbled three times with the Huskies recovering twice. Michigan trailed, 20-3, at the end of the third quarter and did not score a touchdown until the final two seconds of the game.[9]
  • Penn State 20, Iowa 17. Iowa (ranked No. 5 in the AP poll) lost to Penn State (ranked No. 12), 20–17, before a crowd of 66,145 at Kinnick Stadium in Iowa City. Iowa lost three fumbles, two by the punter. With less than two minutes left in the game, Iowa drove to the Penn State 29-yard line. On fourth-and-one, Ronnie Harmon was stopped by the Penn State defense.[10]
  • Ohio State 44, Washington State 0. Ohio State (ranked No. 9 in the AP poll) defeated Washington State, 44–0, before a crowd of 89,297 at Ohio Stadium in Columbus. Keith Byars totaled 145 rushing yards and 47 receiving yards and scored two touchdowns. The game was Ohio State's first shutout since 1980.[11]
  • Stanford 34, Illinois 19.
  • Miami (FL) 28, Purdue 17.
  • Wisconsin 35, Missouri 34.
  • Notre Dame 24, Michigan State 20.
  • Nebraska 38, Minnesota 7.
  • Syracuse 13, Northwestern 12.
  • Kentucky 48, Indiana 14.

September 22[edit]

On September 22, 1984, the Big Ten teams played five conference games.

  • Ohio State 45, Iowa 26.
  • Illinois 40, Michigan State 7.
  • Purdue 34, Minnesota 10.
  • Michigan 20, Wisconsin 14.
  • Northwestern 40, Indiana 37.

September 29[edit]

On September 29, 1984, the Big Ten teams played five conference games.

  • Ohio State 35, Minnesota 22.
  • Iowa 21, Illinois 16.
  • Purdue 13, Michigan State 10.
  • Wisconsin 31, Northwestern 16.
  • Michigan 14, Indiana 6.

October 6[edit]

On October 6, 1984, the Big Ten teams played five conference games.

  • Purdue 28, Ohio State 23.
  • Iowa 31, Northwestern 3.
  • Illinois 22, Wisconsin 6.
  • Michigan State 19, Michigan 7.
  • Minnesota 33, Indiana 24.

October 13[edit]

On October 13, 1984, the Big Ten teams played five conference games.

  • Ohio State 45, Illinois 38.
  • Iowa 40, Purdue 3.
  • Minnesota 17, Wisconsin 14.
  • Michigan 31, Northwestern 0.
  • Michigan State 13, Indiana 6.

October 20[edit]

On October 20, 1984, the Big Ten football teams played five conference games.

  • Ohio State 23, Michigan State 20.
  • Iowa 26, Michigan 0.
  • Illinois 34, Purdue 20.
  • Wisconsin 20, Indiana 16.
  • Northwestern 31, Minnesota 28.

October 27[edit]

On October 27, 1984, the Big Ten teams played five conference games.

  • Wisconsin 16, Ohio State 14.
  • Iowa 24, Indiana 20.
  • Michigan 26, Illinois 18.
  • Purdue 49, Northwestern 7.
  • Michigan State 20, Minnesota 13.

November 3[edit]

On November 3, 1984, the Big Ten football teams played five conference games.

  • Ohio State 50, Indiana 7.
  • Iowa 10, Wisconsin 10.
  • Illinois 48, Minnesota 3.
  • Purdue 31, Michigan 29.
  • Michigan State 27, Northwestern 10.

November 10[edit]

On November 10, 1984, the Big Ten teams played five conference games.

  • Ohio State 52, Northwestern 3.
  • Michigan State 17, Iowa 16.
  • Illinois 34, Indiana 7.
  • Wisconsin 30, Purdue 13.
  • Michigan 31, Minnesota 7.

November 17[edit]

On November 17, 1984, the Big Ten teams played four conference games. Illinois and Northwestern did not play.

  • Ohio State 21, Michigan 6. Ohio State (ranked No. 11 in the AP Poll) defeated Michigan, 21–6, before a crowd of 90,286 at Ohio Stadium in Columbus, Ohio.
  • Minnesota 23, Iowa 17.
  • Purdue 31, Indiana 24.
  • Wisconsin 20, Michigan State 10.

December 1[edit]

On December 1, 1984, the Big Ten's regular season came to an end with a single non-conference game.

Bowl games[edit]

Six of ten Big Ten football teams participated in post-season bowl games.

1985 Rose Bowl[edit]

On January 1, 1985, Ohio State (ranked No. 6 in the AP poll) lost to USC (ranked No. 18), 20-17, before a crowd of 102,594 in the 1985 Rose Bowl at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena, California. Ohio State quarterback Mike Tomczak threw three interceptions.

1984 Peach Bowl[edit]

On December 31, 1984, Purdue lost to Virginia, 27-24, before a crowd of 41,107 in the 1984 Peach Bowl at Atlanta–Fulton County Stadium in Atlanta. Purdue quarterback Jim Everett passed for 253 yards and three touchdowns, but the Boilermakers gained just 75 yards rushing and committed four turnovers in their first bowl loss.

1984 Hall of Fame Classic[edit]

On December 29, 1984, Wisconsin lost to Kentucky, 20-19, before a crowd of 47,300 in the 1984 Hall of Fame Classic at Legion Field in Birmingham, Alabama.

1984 Freedom Bowl[edit]

On December 26, 1984, Iowa defeated Texas (ranked No. 19 in the AP poll), 55–17, in the 1984 Freedom Bowl at Anaheim Stadium in Anaheim, California.

1984 Cherry Bowl[edit]

On December 22, 1984, Michigan State lost to Army, 10–6, before a crowd of 70,336 at the Silverdome in Pontiac, Michigan.

1984 Holiday Bowl[edit]

On December 21, 1984, Michigan lost to BYU (ranked No. 1 in the AP and UPI polls), 24-17, before a crowd of 61,248 at Jack Murphy Stadium in San Diego. Robbie Bosco, playing with an injured leg, led BYU's winning touchdown drive in the final quarter, ending with a touchdown pass from Bosco to Kelly Smith with 1:23 remaining. After the bowl season, BYU was recognized as the 1984 consensus national champion.

Statistical leaders[edit]

The Big Ten's individual statistical leaders include the following:[1]

Awards and honors[edit]

All-Big Ten honors[edit]

The following players were picked by the Associated Press (AP) and/or the United Press International (UPI) as first-team players on the 1984 All-Big Ten Conference football team.

Offense

Position Name Team Selectors
Quarterback Chuck Long Iowa AP, UPI
Running back Keith Byars Ohio State AP, UPI
Running back Ronnie Harmon Iowa AP, UPI
Running back Thomas Rooks Illinois UPI
Center Kirk Lowdermilk Ohio State AP, UPI
Guard Chris Babyar Illinois AP, UPI
Guard Jim Lachey Ohio State AP, UPI
Tackle Jeff Dellenbach Wisconsin AP, UPI
Tackle Jim Juriga Illinois AP
Tackle Mark Krerowicz Ohio State UPI
Tight end Cap Boso Illinois AP
Receiver Al Toon Wisconsin AP, UPI
Receiver David Williams Illinois AP, UPI

Defense

Position Name Team Selectors
Defensive line Keith Cruise Northwestern AP, UPI
Defensive line Paul Hufford Iowa AP, UPI
Defensive line George Little Iowa AP, UPI
Defensive line Kevin Brooks Michigan UPI
Defensive line Darryl Sims Wisconsin AP
Linebacker Pepper Johnson Ohio State AP, UPI
Linebacker Mike Mallory Michigan AP, UPI
Linebacker Larry Station Iowa AP, UPI
Linebacker Jim Morrissey Michigan State UPI
Linebacker Joe Fitzgerald Indiana AP
Defensive back Mike Stoops Iowa AP, UPI
Defensive back Rod Woodson Purdue AP
Defensive back Devon Mitchell Iowa AP
Defensive back Phil Parker Michigan State UPI
Defensive back Richard Johnson Wisconsin UPI

All-American honors[edit]

At the end of the 1984 season, four Big Ten players were consensus first-team picks for the 1984 College Football All-America Team.[12] The Big Ten's consensus All-Americans were:

Position Name Team Selectors
Running back Keith Byars Ohio State AFCA, AP, FWAA, UPI, WC, GNS, NEA, TSN
Receiver David Williams Illinois AFCA, AP, FWAA, UPI, WCFF, GNS, NEA, TSN
Offensive guard Jim Lachey Ohio State FWAA, UPI, GNS
Linebacker Larry Station Iowa AFCA, AP, UPI, WCFF

Other Big Ten players who were named first-team All-Americans by at least one selector were:

Position Name Team Selectors
Tight end Jon Hayes Iowa GNS
Defensive back Richard Johnson Wisconsin FWAA, NEA, TSN

Other awards[edit]

1985 NFL Draft[edit]

The 1985 NFL Draft was held in New York on April 30 and May 1, 1985 in New York City, New York.[14] The following players were among the first 100 picks:[15]

Name Position Team Round Overall pick
Kevin Allen Offensive tackle Indiana 1 9
Al Toon Wide Receiver Wisconsin 1 10
Richard Johnson Cornerback Wisconsin 1 11
Jim Lachey Offensive tackle Ohio State 1 12

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o "1984 Big Ten Conference Year Summary". SR/College Football. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved March 6, 2017.
  2. ^ "Big 10 MVPs". Chicago Tribune. January 14, 1985. p. 14.
  3. ^ Robert Markus (September 2, 1984). "Illini rally to topple NU". Chicago Tribune. pp. 4–1, 4–4.
  4. ^ Tommy George (September 9, 1984). "Michigan tips Miami off the top". Detroit Free Press. pp. 1H, 9H.
  5. ^ "Beavers fall to Ohio St". Statesman-Journal (Salem, Oregon). September 9, 1984. pp. 1F, 8F.
  6. ^ Bob Dyer (September 9, 1984). "Big-play Hawks cruise by ISU, 59-21". The Des Moines Register. p. 1D, 4D.
  7. ^ "Purdue shocks Irish, 23-21". Journal and Courier (Lafayette, Indiana). September 9, 1984. p. B1.
  8. ^ Robert Markus (September 9, 1984). "Missouri's slick, but Illinois hangs on". Chicago Tribune. pp. 4–1, 4–8.
  9. ^ Tommy George (September 16, 1984). "Huskies dump lifeless Michigan, 20-11". Detroit Free Press. pp. 1D, 9D.
  10. ^ Bob Dyer (September 16, 1984). "Penn State thwarts Hawkeyes, 20-17: 4th-quarter Iowa drive falls short". The Des Moines Register. p. 1D.
  11. ^ Cindy Starr (September 16, 1984). "Buckeyes, Byars Bull Through Washington State". The Cincinnati Enquirer. p. C6.
  12. ^ "2014 NCAA Football Records: Consensus All-America Selections" (PDF). National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). 2014. pp. 5–6. Retrieved March 6, 2017.
  13. ^ "1984 Heisman Trophy Voting". SR/College Football. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved March 6, 2017.
  14. ^ "NFL Draft Locations". FootballGeography.com. October 2, 2014. Archived from the original on 2015-09-05. Retrieved October 23, 2014.
  15. ^ "1985 NFL Draft: Full Draft". NFL.com. National Football League. Retrieved March 6, 2017.