2000 United States elections

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2000 United States elections
Presidential election year
Election dayNovember 7, 2000
Incumbent presidentBill Clinton (Democratic)
Next Congress107th
Presidential election
Partisan controlRepublican Gain
Popular vote marginDemocratic +0.5%
Electoral vote
George W. Bush (R)271
Al Gore (D)266
2000 United States presidential election in California2000 United States presidential election in Oregon2000 United States presidential election in Washington (state)2000 United States presidential election in Idaho2000 United States presidential election in Nevada2000 United States presidential election in Utah2000 United States presidential election in Arizona2000 United States presidential election in Montana2000 United States presidential election in Wyoming2000 United States presidential election in Colorado2000 United States presidential election in New Mexico2000 United States presidential election in North Dakota2000 United States presidential election in South Dakota2000 United States presidential election in Nebraska2000 United States presidential election in Kansas2000 United States presidential election in Oklahoma2000 United States presidential election in Texas2000 United States presidential election in Minnesota2000 United States presidential election in Iowa2000 United States presidential election in Missouri2000 United States presidential election in Arkansas2000 United States presidential election in Louisiana2000 United States presidential election in Wisconsin2000 United States presidential election in Illinois2000 United States presidential election in Michigan2000 United States presidential election in Indiana2000 United States presidential election in Ohio2000 United States presidential election in Kentucky2000 United States presidential election in Tennessee2000 United States presidential election in Mississippi2000 United States presidential election in Alabama2000 United States presidential election in Georgia2000 United States presidential election in Florida2000 United States presidential election in South Carolina2000 United States presidential election in North Carolina2000 United States presidential election in Virginia2000 United States presidential election in West Virginia2000 United States presidential election in the District of Columbia2000 United States presidential election in Maryland2000 United States presidential election in Delaware2000 United States presidential election in Pennsylvania2000 United States presidential election in New Jersey2000 United States presidential election in New York2000 United States presidential election in Connecticut2000 United States presidential election in Rhode Island2000 United States presidential election in Vermont2000 United States presidential election in New Hampshire2000 United States presidential election in Maine2000 United States presidential election in Massachusetts2000 United States presidential election in Hawaii2000 United States presidential election in Alaska2000 United States presidential election in the District of Columbia2000 United States presidential election in Maryland2000 United States presidential election in Delaware2000 United States presidential election in New Jersey2000 United States presidential election in Connecticut2000 United States presidential election in Rhode Island2000 United States presidential election in Massachusetts2000 United States presidential election in Vermont2000 United States presidential election in New HampshireElectoralCollege2000.svg
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2000 presidential election results. Red denotes states won by Bush, blue denotes states won by Gore. Numbers indicate the electoral votes won by each candidate.
Senate elections
Overall controlDemocratic Gain[1]
Seats contested34 of 100 seats
(33 Class I seats +1 special election)
Net seat changeDemocratic +4
2000 Senate election map.svg
2000 Senate results

  Democratic gain   Democratic hold
  Republican gain   Republican hold

House elections
Overall controlRepublican Hold
Seats contestedAll 435 voting members
Popular vote marginRepublican +0.5%
Net seat changeDemocratic +1
2000 House Elections in the United States.png
2000 House of Representatives results

  Democratic gain   Democratic hold
  Republican gain   Republican hold
  Independent gain   Independent hold

Gubernatorial elections
Seats contested14 (12 states, 2 territories)
Net seat changeDemocratic +1
2000 Gubernatorial election map.svg
2000 gubernatorial election results
Territorial races not shown

  Democratic gain   Democratic hold
  Republican gain   Republican hold

The 2000 United States elections were held on November 7, 2000.

President[edit]

In the 2000 presidential election, Republican Texas Governor George W. Bush defeated Democratic incumbent Vice President Al Gore. The election was eye-catchingly close, but was the third straight election where neither party won a majority of the popular vote. [2]

United States House of Representatives[edit]

Republicans lost two seats in the House, while Democrats gained 1 seat and 1 independent, Virgil Goode, was elected.[3] Following the 2000 election, the majority of the House seaters in the South and Midwest were held by the Republican party, while the larger number of seats in the Northeast and West were held by the Democratic party.[4]

United States Senate[edit]

The 33 seats in the United States Senate Class 1 were up for election plus one special election. The Senate became split 50-50 until 2001 when Senator Jim Jeffords left the Republican Party and caucused with the Democrats.[5]

Six senators were defeated in the November 2000 election. The five defeated Republicans included Spencer Abraham of Michigan, John Ashcroft of Missouri, Slade Gorton of Washington, Rod Grams of Minnesota, and William V. Roth of Delaware. The single defeated Democrat was Charles S. Robb of Virginia.[6]

Governors[edit]

One sitting governor was defeated in the November 2000 general election. Cecil H. Underwood, Republican of West Virginia, concluded the 2000 election with a 47.2 election percentage. Bob Wise, Democrat, was elected to a four-year term.[7]

Local elections[edit]

Mayoral elections[edit]

Some of the major American cities that held their mayoral elections in 2000 included:

Initiatives and Referenda[edit]

Vote for same-sex marriage ban by counties:
  90–100%
  80–90%
  70–80%
  60–70%
  50–60%

References[edit]

  1. ^ Republicans briefly lost their Senate majority in January 2001 when the 107th Congress was seated, but they regained their majority that same month when Republican Dick Cheney was sworn in as vice president. Democrats gained the majority in the Senate in May 2001 after Senator Jim Jeffords left the Republican Senate Caucus.
  2. ^ Scammon, Richard M., Alice V. McGillivray, and Rhodes Cook. America Votes 24: A Handbook of Contemporary American Election Statistics, 2000. Washington, D.C.: CQ, 2001. Print.
  3. ^ "2000 Presidential Election". The American Presidency Project. Retrieved 13 August 2011.
  4. ^ Scammon, Richard M., Alice V. McGillivray, and Rhodes Cook. America Votes 24: A Handbook of Contemporary American Election Statistics, 2000. Washington, D.C.: CQ, 2001. Print.
  5. ^ "Statistics of the Presidential and Congressional Election of November 7, 2000" (PDF). U.S. House of Reps, Office of the Clerk. Retrieved 10 April 2017.
  6. ^ Scammon, Richard M., Alice V. McGillivray, and Rhodes Cook. America Votes 24: A Handbook of Contemporary American Election Statistics, 2000. Washington, D.C.: CQ, 2001. Print.
  7. ^ Scammon, Richard M., Alice V. McGillivray, and Rhodes Cook. America Votes 24: A Handbook of Contemporary American Election Statistics, 2000. Washington, D.C.: CQ, 2001. Print.
  8. ^ Perry, Tony (November 9, 2000). "San Diego Winner Puts Ethics Panel on Agenda". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved October 19, 2014.

External links[edit]