2004 North Carolina judicial election

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Several judges of the North Carolina Supreme Court and the North Carolina Court of Appeals, the state's two appellate courts, were elected on November 2, 2004. The U.S. Presidential election, 2004, U.S. House election, 2004, U.S. Senate election, 2004, North Carolina Council of State election, 2004 and North Carolina General Assembly election, 2004 were held on the same day.

Appellate judges in North Carolina are elected to eight-year terms in statewide judicial elections. In 2004, for the first time, all these elections were non-partisan. If more than two candidates filed for a given seat, a non-partisan primary would be held, and the two highest vote-getters, regardless of party, would advance to the general election. The only 2004 race in which more than two candidates filed for the primary was the Thornburg Court of Appeals seat.[1][2]

Supreme Court (Parker seat)[edit]

Associate Justice Sarah Parker, the incumbent, was challenged by Court of Appeals Judge John M. Tyson.

Results[edit]

Candidate Popular Vote[3] Pct
Sarah Parker 1,732,399 64%
John M. Tyson 977,861 36%

Supreme Court (Orr seat)[edit]

The resignation of Associate Justice Robert F. Orr, too late for a primary election to be held, led to a situation in which there was no primary election to eliminate candidates, but rather, the winner was simply determined by plurality. Eight candidates filed: Assistant U.S. Attorney Paul Newby (who received the endorsement of the state Republican Party), North Carolina Superior Court Judge Howard Manning, Pre-Paid Legal Services attorney and former judicial law clerk Rachel Hunter, Administrative Law Judge Fred Morrison, attorney Ronnie Ansley, former appeals court judge Betsy McCrodden, current appeals court judge Jim Wynn, and attorney Marvin Schiller (who had just lost in the primary for the Thornburg Court of Appeals seat). [4]

Results[edit]

Candidate Popular Vote[3] Pct
Paul Martin Newby 582,684 23%
James A. Wynn, Jr. 508,416 20%
Rachel Lea Hunter 452,298 18%
Howard E. Manning, Jr. 312,319 12%
Betsy McCrodden 281,777 11%
Ronnie Ansley 213,657 8%
Fred Morrison, Jr. 163,601 6%
Marvin Schiller 64,824 3%

Court of Appeals (McGee seat)[edit]

Incumbent Judge Linda McGee was challenged by attorney Bill Parker.[4]

Results[edit]

Candidate Popular Vote[3] Pct
Linda McGee 1,520,455 58%
Bill Parker 1,112,128 42%

Court of Appeals (Bryant seat)[edit]

Incumbent Judge Wanda G. Bryant had been appointed to the Court by the Governor following her 2002 defeat for a different seat.[5] She was challenged by Wake County District Court Judge Alice Stubbs.[4]

Results[edit]

Candidate Popular Vote[3] Pct
Wanda G. Bryant 1,416,123 54%
Alice C. Stubbs 1,183,962 46%

Court of Appeals (Thornburg seat)[edit]

Incumbent Judge Alan Thornburg had been appointed to the court by the Governor. Three candidates filed to challenge Thornburg for a full term: Barbara Jackson, who was then general counsel at the N.C. Department of Labor, along with attorneys Marcus W. Williams and Marvin Schiller. Jackson and Thornburg finished first and second, respectively, in the July primary, thereby qualifying them to compete in the general election.[6][7]

Results[edit]

Candidate Popular Vote[3] Pct
Barbara Jackson 1,399,528 55%
Alan Thornburg 1,141,896 45%

References[edit]