2008 United States presidential election in Minnesota

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United States presidential election in Minnesota, 2008

← 2004 November 4, 2008 2012 →
Turnout78.11%[1] Decrease
  Obama portrait crop.jpg John McCain official portrait 2009.jpg
Nominee Barack Obama John McCain
Party Democratic Republican
Home state Illinois Arizona
Running mate Joe Biden Sarah Palin
Electoral vote 10 0
Popular vote 1,573,354 1,275,409
Percentage 54.06% 43.82%

Minnesota presidential election results 2008.svg
County Results

President before election

George W. Bush
Republican

Elected President

Barack Obama
Democratic

The 2008 United States presidential election in Minnesota took place on November 4, 2008, and was part of the 2008 United States presidential election. Voters chose 10 representatives, or electors to the Electoral College, who voted for president and vice president.

Minnesota was won by Democratic nominee Barack Obama by a 10.2% margin of victory. Prior to the election, all 17 news organizations considered this a state Obama would win, or otherwise considered as a safe blue state. Barack Obama carried the state with 54.06% of the vote in 2008 over John McCain's 43.82%. Minnesota has not voted Republican since Richard Nixon in 1972.

Caucuses[edit]

Campaign[edit]

Predictions[edit]

There were 16 news organizations who made state-by-state predictions of the election. Here are the last predictions before election day:

Polling[edit]

In the aftermath of the GOP National Convention that was highlighted by a well delivered and received speech by vice presidential nominee Governor Sarah Palin, a strong Obama lead tightened into a very narrow polling lead. However, when the September financial crisis irreparably damaged McCain's chances at victory, McCain remained competitive in Minnesota for some time after Obama had pulled away in other states such as Michigan and Wisconsin. At no time, however, did polls indicate that John McCain was ahead in the state, and Obama eventually did pull away from John McCain.[15]

Fundraising[edit]

John McCain raised a total of $2,423,705 in the state. Barack Obama raised $6,058,168.[16]

Advertising and visits[edit]

Obama and his interest groups $3,006,784. McCain and his interest groups spent 4,467,107.[17] The Republican ticket visited the state 9 times. Obama visited the state only once.[18]

Analysis[edit]

Although Minnesota, a Democratic-leaning state, had voted for the Democratic presidential candidate of every election since 1972, the margin of victory had been narrow in the past two presidential elections. With this in mind, Republicans targeted the state for the 2008 election, holding the 2008 Republican National Convention in Minneapolis-St. Paul. Although the state swung more Democratic in 2008 and Barack Obama performed better here than John Kerry did in 2004, the swing was smaller than the national average.

During the same election, a contentious U.S. Senate battle took place between incumbent Republican U.S. Senator Norm Coleman and Democrat Al Franken. The close election resulted in two court appeals, which both eventually declared Franken the winner, which caused Coleman to concede. At the state level, Democrats picked up two seats in the Minnesota House of Representatives and one seat in the Minnesota Senate.

On Election Day, Obama won Minnesota by a comfortable margin, piling up 2-1 margins in Hennepin County (Minneapolis) and Ramsey County (St. Paul). Obama also ran evenly in the Minneapolis suburbs and rural Minnesota. However, McCain mostly held the same counties Bush won in the Republican base of central Minnesota.[19] While Obama still won the state with ease, GOP efforts and the Republican National Convention led to a better Republican performance than seen in neighboring states in the Upper Midwest, and prevented the collapse of Republican support that occurred in neighboring Michigan and Wisconsin.

As of the 2016 presidential election, this is the last election in which Stevens County, Watonwan County, Pope County, Grant County, Yellow Medicine County, Lincoln County, Pennington County, Murray County, Pine County, Big Stone County, Marshall County, Polk County, Red Lake County, and Aitkin County voted for the Democratic candidate.

Results[edit]

United States presidential election in Minnesota, 2008[20]
Party Candidate Running mate Votes Percentage Electoral votes
Democratic Barack Obama Joe Biden 1,573,354 54.06% 10
Republican John McCain Sarah Palin 1,275,409 43.82% 0
Independent Ralph Nader Matt Gonzalez 30,152 1.04% 0
Independent Write-in candidates 9,496 0.33% 0
Libertarian Bob Barr Wayne Allyn Root 9,174 0.32% 0
Constitution Chuck Baldwin Darrell Castle 6,787 0.23% 0
Green Cynthia McKinney Rosa Clemente 5,174 0.18% 0
Socialist Workers Róger Calero Alyson Kennedy 790 0.03% 0
Independent Alan Keyes (write-in) Brian Rohrbough 22 0.00% 0
Socialist Party USA Brian Moore (write-in) Stewart Alexander 7 0.00% 0
Independent Joe Schriner (write-in) Dale Way 3 0.00% 0
Independent Curtis Montgomery (write-in) Janice Montgomery 1 0.00% 0
Totals 2,910,369 100.00% 10
Voter turnout (Voting age population) 74.7%

By congressional district[edit]

Barack Obama carried five of the state’s eight congressional districts in Minnesota, including one seat held by a Republican. John McCain carried three congressional districts, including one seat held by a Democrat.

District McCain Obama Representative
1st 46.59% 50.96% Tim Walz
2nd 49.76% 48.32% John Kline
3rd 45.99% 52.41% Jim Ramstad (110th Congress)
Erik Paulsen (111th Congress)
4th 33.57% 64.41% Betty McCollum
5th 23.79% 74.15% Keith Ellison
6th 53.33% 44.60% Michele Bachmann
7th 50.10% 47.39% Collin Peterson
8th 44.50% 53.10% Jim Oberstar

By county[edit]

County Obama% Obama# McCain% McCain# Others% Others# Total
Aitkin County 48.83% 4,595 48.77% 4,589 2.4% 226 9,410
Anoka County 47.73% 86,976 50.13% 91,357 2.14% 3,891 182,224
Becker County 45.31% 7,687 52.17% 8,851 2.52% 427 16,965
Beltrami County 54.05% 12,019 43.90% 9,762 2.05% 455 22,236
Benton County 43.71% 8,454 53.46% 10,338 2.83% 547 19,339
Big Stone County 51.91% 1,552 45.55% 1,362 2.54% 76 2,990
Blue Earth County 55.10% 19,325 42.15% 14,782 2.75% 963 35,070
Brown County 42.65% 5,809 54.74% 7,456 2.61% 355 13,620
Carlton County 62.34% 11,501 35.50% 6,549 2.16% 399 18,449
Carver County 41.57% 20,654 56.67% 28,156 1.76% 873 49,683
Cass County 44.62% 7,276 53.11% 8,660 2.28% 371 16,307
Chippewa County 51.60% 3,280 45.74% 2,907 2.66% 169 6,356
Chisago County 43.62% 12,783 53.88% 15,789 2.5% 733 29,305
Clay County 56.96% 16,666 40.94% 11,978 2.1% 615 29,259
Clearwater County 44.05% 1,877 53.77% 2,291 2.18% 93 4,261
Cook County 60.30% 2,019 37.04% 1,240 2.66% 89 3,348
Cottonwood County 45.71% 2,759 52.30% 3,157 1.99% 120 6,036
Crow Wing County 45.10% 15,859 52.80% 18,567 2.1% 739 35,165
Dakota County 51.79% 116,778 46.29% 104,364 1.92% 4,330 225,472
Dodge County 43.70% 4,463 53.54% 5,468 2.76% 282 10,213
Douglas County 44.25% 9,256 53.74% 11,241 2.01% 421 20,918
Faribault County 45.83% 3,736 51.47% 4,196 2.7% 220 8,152
Fillmore County 52.71% 5,921 44.45% 4,993 2.85% 320 11,234
Freeborn County 57.38% 9,915 40.25% 6,955 2.37% 410 17,280
Goodhue County 48.15% 12,420 49.53% 12,775 2.33% 600 25,795
Grant County 51.32% 1,850 45.66% 1,646 3.02% 109 3,605
Hennepin County 63.42% 420,958 34.81% 231,054 1.77% 11,768 663,780
Houston County 54.27% 5,906 43.58% 4,743 2.15% 234 10,883
Hubbard County 41.86% 4,872 56.35% 6,558 1.79% 208 11,638
Isanti County 41.13% 8,248 56.47% 11,324 2.4% 481 20,053
Itasca County 55.18% 13,460 42.26% 10,309 2.57% 626 24,395
Jackson County 46.56% 2,618 50.83% 2,858 2.61% 147 5,623
Kanabec County 44.04% 3,743 52.70% 4,479 3.26% 277 8,499
Kandiyohi County 46.24% 10,125 51.70% 11,319 2.06% 451 21,895
Kittson County 58.10% 1,492 39.56% 1,016 2.34% 60 2,568
Koochiching County 53.65% 3,649 43.55% 2,962 2.81% 191 6,802
Lac qui Parle County 51.53% 2,160 45.61% 1,912 2.86% 120 4,192
Lake County 59.89% 4,174 37.82% 2,636 2.28% 159 6,969
Lake of the Woods County 41.98% 971 55.25% 1,278 2.77% 64 2,313
Le Sueur County 46.60% 6,994 50.88% 7,636 2.53% 379 15,009
Lincoln County 48.53% 1,517 47.70% 1,491 3.77% 118 3,126
Lyon County 48.08% 6,110 49.69% 6,315 2.23% 283 12,708
McLeod County 39.44% 7,505 57.77% 10,993 2.79% 531 19,029
Mahnomen County 61.29% 1,436 35.98% 843 2.73% 64 2,343
Marshall County 48.77% 2,311 48.22% 2,285 3.02% 143 4,739
Martin County 41.04% 4,413 56.29% 6,053 2.68% 288 10,754
Meeker County 42.89% 5,380 53.70% 6,737 3.41% 428 12,545
Mille Lacs County 44.83% 6,072 52.05% 7,049 3.12% 423 13,544
Morrison County 39.10% 6,547 58.14% 9,735 2.75% 461 16,743
Mower County 60.48% 11,605 36.87% 7,075 2.64% 507 19,187
Murray County 48.72% 2,345 48.20% 2,320 3.08% 148 4,813
Nicollet County 54.19% 9,887 43.67% 7,968 2.14% 390 18,245
Nobles County 48.16% 4,244 49.56% 4,368 2.28% 201 8,813
Norman County 62.00% 2,129 35.06% 1,204 2.94% 101 3,434
Olmsted County 50.62% 38,711 47.34% 36,202 2.04% 1,557 76,470
Otter Tail County 42.39% 13,856 55.30% 18,077 2.31% 754 32,687
Pennington County 49.75% 3,394 47.61% 3,248 2.64% 180 6,822
Pine County 49.25% 7,084 47.71% 6,862 3.04% 437 14,383
Pipestone County 42.14% 2,023 55.24% 2,652 2.62% 126 4,801
Polk County 51.19% 7,850 46.62% 7,148 2.19% 336 15,334
Pope County 50.75% 3,317 46.96% 3,069 2.29% 150 6,536
Ramsey County 65.96% 182,974 32.06% 88,942 1.97% 5,470 277,386
Red Lake County 51.12% 1,120 44.87% 983 4.02% 88 2,191
Redwood County 41.63% 3,250 55.19% 4,308 3.18% 248 7,806
Renville County 47.99% 3,904 48.63% 3,956 3.38% 275 8,135
Rice County 54.66% 17,381 43.16% 13,723 2.19% 695 31,799
Rock County 41.79% 2,079 55.78% 2,775 2.43% 121 4,975
Roseau County 40.22% 3,097 57.64% 4,438 2.14% 165 7,700
St. Louis County 65.10% 77,351 32.61% 38,742 2.29% 2,721 118,814
Scott County 43.51% 29,208 54.70% 36,724 1.79% 1,200 67,132
Sherburne County 39.91% 17,957 58.10% 26,140 1.98% 893 44,990
Sibley County 38.79% 2,998 58.12% 4,492 3.09% 239 7,729
Stearns County 45.32% 35,690 52.31% 41,194 2.38% 1,872 78,756
Steele County 45.87% 9,016 51.22% 10,068 2.91% 572 19,656
Stevens County 49.36% 2,781 48.10% 2,710 2.54% 143 5,634
Swift County 55.43% 2,907 41.65% 2,184 2.92% 153 5,244
Todd County 43.05% 5,277 54.15% 6,637 2.8% 343 12,257
Traverse County 51.25% 1,043 45.85% 933 2.9% 59 2,035
Wabasha County 47.47% 5,646 49.90% 5,935 2.62% 312 11,893
Wadena County 40.20% 2,882 57.58% 4,128 2.22% 159 7,169
Waseca County 44.51% 4,401 52.70% 5,211 2.79% 276 9,888
Washington County 51.27% 70,277 46.94% 64,334 1.79% 2,448 137,059
Watonwan County 48.73% 2,562 48.04% 2,526 3.23% 170 5,258
Wilkin County 45.40% 1,550 52.31% 1,786 2.28% 78 3,414
Winona County 58.38% 16,308 39.29% 10,975 2.33% 652 27,935
Wright County 40.17% 26,343 57.61% 37,779 2.22% 1,456 65,578
Yellow Medicine County 50.57% 2,816 46.31% 2,579 3.12% 174 5,569

Electors[edit]

Technically the voters of Minnesota heir ballots for electors: representatives to the Electoral College. Minnesota is allocated 10 electors because it has 8 congressional districts and 2 senators. All candidates who appear on the ballot or qualify to receive write-in votes must submit a list of 10 electors, who pledge to vote for their candidate and his or her running mate. Whoever wins the majority of votes in the state is awarded all 10 electoral votes. Their chosen electors then vote for president and vice president. Following an apparent mishap in the previous election, whereby an elector pledged to Democrat presidential candidate John Kerry instead cast their vote for running-mate John Edwards and thus became a faithless elector, Minnesota amended its statutes and became one of the few states whereby electors are legally required to vote for the candidate they are pledged to. This was the first election where the new laws were effective.[21]

The electors of each state and the District of Columbia met on December 15, 2008, to cast their votes for president and vice president. The Electoral College itself never meets as one body. Instead the electors from each state and the District of Columbia met in their respective capitols.

The following were the members of the Electoral College from the state. All 10 were pledged to Barack Obama and Joe Biden:[22]

  1. Arthur A. Anderson
  2. Jim Gremmels
  3. Dave Lee
  4. Al Patton
  5. Joan M. Wittman
  6. William J. Davis
  7. Benjamin F. Gross
  8. Matt Little
  9. Jackie Stevenson
  10. Susan Kay Moravec - replaced Donyta J. Wright who did not appear for the ceremony[23]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Office of the State Of Minnesota Secretary of State". www.sos.state.mn.us. Retrieved 2017-07-22.
  2. ^ D.C.'s Political Report: The complete source for campaign summaries
  3. ^ Presidential | The Cook Political Report Archived May 5, 2015, at the Wayback Machine
  4. ^ Adnaan (2008-09-20). "Track the Electoral College vote predictions". The Takeaway. Archived from the original on April 22, 2009. Retrieved 2009-11-14.
  5. ^ Electoral-vote.com: President, Senate, House Updated Daily
  6. ^ a b c d Based on Takeaway
  7. ^ POLITICO's 2008 Swing State Map - POLITICO.com
  8. ^ RealClearPolitics - Electoral Map
  9. ^ CQ Politics | CQ Presidential Election Maps, 2008 Archived October 29, 2008, at the Wayback Machine
  10. ^ "Electoral College Map". The New York Times. Retrieved 2010-05-26.
  11. ^ "October – 2008 – CNN Political Ticker - CNN.com Blogs". CNN. Retrieved 2010-05-26.
  12. ^ "Winning the Electoral College". Fox News. 2010-04-27.
  13. ^ roadto270
  14. ^ Election 2008: Electoral College Update - Rasmussen Reports™
  15. ^ "Minnesota: McCain vs. Obama". Retrieved 2009-04-05.
  16. ^ Presidential Campaign Finance
  17. ^ "Map: Campaign Ad Spending - Election Center 2008 from CNN.com". CNN. Retrieved 2010-05-26.
  18. ^ "Map: Campaign Candidate Visits - Election Center 2008 from CNN.com". CNN. Retrieved 2010-05-26.
  19. ^ "Election Results 2008". The New York Times. Archived from the original on November 3, 2004. Retrieved 2009-04-05.
  20. ^ "Official General Election Results". Minnesota Secretary of State. Archived from the original on 2008-12-08. Retrieved 2008-12-12.
  21. ^ "208.08, 2008 Minnesota Statutes". Revisor.leg.state.mn.us. Retrieved 2016-08-21.
  22. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original (PDF) on November 27, 2008. Retrieved April 19, 2009.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  23. ^ Citizen Elector