2014 United States House of Representatives elections in Arizona

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2014 United States House of Representatives elections in Arizona

← 2012 November 4, 2014 (2014-11-04) 2016 →

All 9 Arizona seats to the United States House of Representatives
  Majority party Minority party
 
Party Republican Democratic
Last election 4 5
Seats won 5 4
Seat change Increase 1 Decrease 1
Popular vote 817,345 557,960
Percentage 55.69% 38.02%
Swing Increase3.62% Decrease5.55%

The 2014 United States House of Representatives elections in Arizona were held on Tuesday, November 4, 2014 to elect the nine U.S. Representatives from the state of Arizona, one from each of the state's nine congressional districts, with Democratic and Republican primaries taking place on August 26. The elections coincided with the elections of other federal and state offices, including Governor of Arizona.

Overview[edit]

The table below shows the total number and percentage of votes, as well as the number of seats gained and lost by each political party in the election for the United States House of Representatives in Arizona. In addition, the voter turnout and the number of votes not valid are listed below.

United States House of Representatives elections in Arizona, 2014[1]
Party Votes Percentage Seats +/–
Republican 817,168 55.68% 5 +1
Democratic 577,943 39.38% 4 -1
Americans Elect 44,924 3.06% 0 -
Libertarian 23,767 1.62% 0 -
Write-ins 3,801 0.26% 0 -
Totals 1,467,603 100% 9 -
Voter turnout %

District 1[edit]

Democratic primary[edit]

Democrat Ann Kirkpatrick won election to the House of Representatives in 2012. She faced no formal opposition in the Democratic primary. She had previously served in this district from 2007 to 2009.

Results[edit]

Democratic primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Ann Kirkpatrick (incumbent) 51,393 100.0
Total votes 51,393 100.0

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Adam Kwasman, a Republican member of the Arizona House of Representatives, ran.[3] Also running were rancher Gary Kiehne and Arizona House of Representatives Speaker Andy Tobin.[4][5]

Pinal County Sheriff Paul Babeu briefly ran for the 4th congressional district in 2012, before dropping out after it emerged that he had threatened to deport his gay lover if he outed Babeu as homosexual. He was speculated to run against Kirkpatrick in 2014, but he declined to do so.[6]

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Gary
Kiehne
Adam
Kwasman
Andy
Tobin
Undecided
Remington August 17–19, 2014 420 ± 4.77% 21% 29% 30% 20%

Results[edit]

Republican primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Andy Tobin 18,814 35.8
Republican Gary Kiehne 18,407 35.1
Republican Adam Kwasman 15,266 29.1
Total votes 52,487 100.0

General election[edit]

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Ann
Kirkpatrick (D)
Andy
Tobin (R)
Undecided
North Star (R-Tobin) September 2014 400 ± 4.9% 42% 48% 10%
Tarrance Group (R-Tobin) September 2–4, 2014 405 ± 4.9% 43% 51% 6%

Results[edit]

Arizona’s 1st congressional district, 2014[7]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Ann Kirkpatrick (incumbent) 97,391 52.6
Republican Andy Tobin 87,723 47.4
Total votes 185,114 100.0
Democratic hold

District 2[edit]

Democratic primary[edit]

Democrat Ron Barber was elected to a full term in the House of Representatives in 2012, narrowly defeating Republican Martha McSally.

Results[edit]

Democratic primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Ron Barber (incumbent) 49,039 100.0
Total votes 49,039 100.0

Republican primary[edit]

McSally filed to run against Barber again in 2014.[8] Also running for the Republican nomination were Shelley Kais and Chuck Wooten.[5]

Results[edit]

Republican primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Martha McSally 45,492 69.3
Republican Chuck Wooten 14,995 22.9
Republican Shelley Kais 5,103 7.8
Total votes 65,590 100.0

General election[edit]

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Ron
Barber (D)
Martha
McSally (R)
Undecided
PMI/RRH October 21–23, 2014 554 ± 4% 48% 46% 5%
Normington Petts (D-Barber) June 8–10, 2014 400 ± 4.9% 45% 37% 18%
On Message Inc. (R-McSally) April 14–16, 2014 400 ± 4.9% 42% 45% 9%
On Message Inc. (R-McSally) June 17–18, 2013 400 ± 4.9% 46% 45% 9%

Results[edit]

As the election margin was less than 1% in favor of McSally, a recount began on December 3, 2014. McSally won the recount by 161 votes.[9]

Arizona’s 2nd congressional district, 2014[7]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Martha McSally 109,704 50.0
Democratic Ron Barber (incumbent) 109,543 49.9
None Sampson U. Ramirez (write-in) 56 0.0
Republican Sydney Dudikoff (write-in) 48 0.0
Total votes 219,351 100.0
Republican gain from Democratic

District 3[edit]

Democrat Raúl Grijalva has represented the district since being elected in 2002.

Republican Gabriela Saucedo Mercer and Libertarian Miguel Olivas also ran.[5]

Democratic primary[edit]

Democratic primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Raúl Grijalva (incumbent) 28,758 100.0
Total votes 28,758 100.0

Republican primary[edit]

Republican primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Gabby Saucedo Mercer 18,823 100.0
Total votes 18,823 100.0

General election[edit]

Results[edit]

Arizona’s 3rd congressional district, 2014[7]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Raúl Grijalva (incumbent) 58,192 55.7
Republican Gabby Saucedo Mercer 46,185 44.2
Independent F. Sanchez (write-in) 43 0.0
Independent Lee Thompson (write-in) 8 0.0
Total votes 104,428 100.0
Democratic hold

District 4[edit]

Republican Paul Gosar has represented the district since being elected in 2010.

Democrat Mike Weisser ran against him.[5]

Republican primary[edit]

Republican primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Paul Gosar (incumbent) 65,354 100.0
Total votes 65,354 100.0

Democratic primary[edit]

Democratic primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Mike Weisser 19,643 100.0
Total votes 19,643 100.0

Libertarian primary[edit]

Libertarian primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Libertarian Chris Rike (write-in) 29 100.0
Total votes 29 100.0

General election[edit]

Results[edit]

Arizona’s 4th congressional district, 2014[7]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Paul Gosar (incumbent) 122,560 70.0
Democratic Mike Weisser 45,179 25.8
Libertarian Chris Rike 7,440 4.2
Total votes 175,179 100.0
Republican hold

District 5[edit]

Republican Matt Salmon has represented the district since being elected in 2012.

He was challenged by Democrat James Woods.[5] Woods was looking to make history as the first openly atheist candidate to be elected to the U.S. Congress (former California Congressman Pete Stark, who served from 1973 to 2013, is an atheist but did not reveal this until 2007; former Massachusetts Congressman Barney Frank revealed that he was an atheist after he left office[10]).

Republican primary[edit]

Republican primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Matt Salmon (incumbent) 71,690 100.0
Total votes 71,690 100.0

Democratic primary[edit]

Democratic primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic James Woods 20,249 100.0
Total votes 20,249 100.0

General election[edit]

Results[edit]

Arizona’s 5th congressional district, 2014[7]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Matt Salmon (incumbent) 124,867 69.6
Democratic James Woods 54,596 30.4
Total votes 179,463 100.0
Republican hold

District 6[edit]

Republican David Schweikert has represented the district since being elected in 2010.

Democrat John W. Williamson ran against him.[5]

Republican primary[edit]

Republican primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican David Schweikert (incumbent) 69,902 100.0
Total votes 69,902 100.0

Democratic primary[edit]

Democratic primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic W. John Williamson 25,306 100.0
Total votes 25,306 100.0

General election[edit]

Results[edit]

Arizona’s 6th congressional district, 2014[7]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican David Schweikert (incumbent) 129,578 64.9
Democratic W. John Williamson 70,198 35.1
Total votes 199,776 100.0
Republican hold

District 7[edit]

The 7th district is heavily Hispanic. It is located primarily in Phoenix, and includes portions of Glendale and the town of Guadalupe. The incumbent was Democrat Ed Pastor, who had represented the district since 2013, and previously represented the 4th district from 2003 to 2013 and the 2nd district from 1991 to 2013. He was re-elected with 82% of the vote in 2012 and the district has a PVI of D+16. Pastor did not run for re-election.[11]

Democratic primary[edit]

Pastor's retirement presented a "once- or twice-in-a-lifetime opportunity" for an open safe Democratic seat in Arizona and was predicted to set off a "free-for-all" in the primary that could "eclipse" the 10-candidate primary for retiring Congressman John Shadegg's seat in 2010. Because of this and Arizona's "resign-to-run" law, political consultant Mario Diaz predicted a "domino effect, from federal (offices) all the way down to city (councils)."[12]

Candidates[edit]

Declared
Withdrew
  • Steve Gallardo, state senator (running for Wilcox's place on the Maricopa County Board of Supervisors)[15]
Removed from ballot
  • Cesar Chavez, formerly Scott Fistler, Republican write-in candidate for the seat in 2012 and candidate for Phoenix City Council in 2013[16][17]
Declined

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Ruben
Gallego
Mary Rose
Wilcox
Other Undecided
Public Policy Polling July 22–24, 2014 500 ± 4.4% 41% 31% 27%
Lake Research (D-Gallego) July 20–22, 2014 400 ± 4.9% 32% 24% 6% 38%
Lake Research (D-Gallego) May 20–22, 2014 401 ± 4.9% 38% 32% 29%

Results[edit]

Democratic primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Ruben Gallego 14,936 48.9
Democratic Mary Rose Wilcox 11,077 36.3
Democratic Randy Camacho 2,330 7.6
Democratic Jarrett Maupin 2,199 7.2
Total votes 30,542 100.0

Republican primary[edit]

Withdrew[edit]

  • Brianna Wasserman[5]

Results[edit]

Republican primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Write-ins 1,125 100.0

Libertarian primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared
Withdrew

Results[edit]

Libertarian primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Libertarian Joe Cobb 300 100.0
Total votes 300 100.0

Americans Elect primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared
Withdrew

Results[edit]

Americans Elect primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Americans Elect Rebecca DeWitt (write-in) 4 100.0
Total votes 4 100.0

General election[edit]

Results[edit]

Arizona’s 7th congressional district, 2014[7]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Ruben Gallego 54,235 74.9
Libertarian Joe Cobb 10,715 14.8
Americans Elect Rebecca Dewitt 3,858 5.3
Independent José Peñalosa 3,496 4.8
Republican Gary Dunn (write-in) 129 0.2
Democratic Gustavo Ortega (write-in) 17 0.0
Independent Samuel Esquivel (write-in) 4 0.0
Total votes 72,454 100.0
Democratic hold

District 8[edit]

Republican Trent Franks has represented the district since being elected in 2002.

Clair Van Steenwyk ran against him in the Republican primary. No Democrat filed to run.[5]

Republican primary[edit]

Republican primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Trent Franks (incumbent) 53,771 73.3
Republican Clair Van Steenwyk 19,629 26.7
Total votes 73,400 100.0

Americans Elect primary[edit]

Americans Elect primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Americans Elect Stephen Dolgos (write-in) 2 100.0

General election[edit]

Results[edit]

Arizona’s 8th congressional district, 2014[7]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Trent Franks (incumbent) 128,710 75.8
Americans Elect Stephen Dolgos 41,066 24.2
Total votes 169,776 100.0
Republican hold

District 9[edit]

Democrat Kyrsten Sinema won election to the House of Representatives in 2012, when the district was created.

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared

Results[edit]

Democratic primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Kyrsten Sinema (incumbent) 31,900 100.0
Total votes 31,900 100.0

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared
Withdrew
Declined

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Wendy
Rogers
Andrew
Walter
Undecided
Coleman Dahm & Associates February 2014 686 15% 7% 78%

Results[edit]

Republican primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Wendy Rogers 30,484 60.6
Republican Andrew Walter 19,808 39.4
Total votes 50,292 100.0

Libertarian primary[edit]

Libertarian primary results[2]
Party Candidate Votes %
Libertarian Powell Gammill (write-in) 52 100.0
Total votes 52 100.0

General election[edit]

Results[edit]

Arizona’s 9th congressional district, 2014[7]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Kyrsten Sinema (incumbent) 88,609 54.7
Republican Wendy Rogers 67,841 41.9
Libertarian Powell Gammill 5,612 3.4
Total votes 162,062 100.0
Democratic hold

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://history.house.gov/Institution/Election-Statistics/Election-Statistics/
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v https://apps.azsos.gov/election/2014/primary/Canvass.pdf
  3. ^ Livingston, Abby (May 14, 2013). "Who Will Take On Ann Kirkpatrick in Arizona? | The Field". Roll Call.
  4. ^ "Arizona GOP candidate says Democrats are behind most mass shootings". Yahoo News. 18 May 2014. Retrieved 17 December 2014.
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n "2014 Primary Election Full Listing". Arizona Secretary of State. May 29, 2014. Archived from the original on May 31, 2014. Retrieved May 30, 2014.
  6. ^ "Paul Babeu Claims He's Not Running for Congress in 2014". Phoenix New Times. July 10, 2013. Retrieved December 9, 2014.
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i https://apps.azsos.gov/election/2014/General/Canvass2014GE.pdf
  8. ^ Cahn, Emily (July 3, 2013). "Martha McSally Files Paperwork for Rematch (Updated) #AZ02". Roll Call. Retrieved July 4, 2013.
  9. ^ Recount starts today in McSally vs. Barber race, Arizona Daily Star, December 3, 2014. Retrieved 8 December 2014.
  10. ^ "Meet James Woods, who could be the first open atheist elected to Congress". Faitheist. Retrieved 17 December 2014.
  11. ^ "Congressman Ed Pastor won't run for re-election". centredaily. February 27, 2014. Retrieved February 27, 2014.
  12. ^ a b "Surprise announcement sets off a scramble by aspiring replacements". AZ Central. February 27, 2014. Retrieved March 3, 2014.
  13. ^ a b c d e "Ed Pastor to Retire in 2014 (Updated) (Video)". Roll Call. February 27, 2014. Retrieved February 27, 2014.
  14. ^ "Mary Rose Wilcox to resign from county board, run for Congress". AZCentral. February 27, 2014. Retrieved February 27, 2014.
  15. ^ "Steve Gallardo exits congressional race for 7th District". AZCentral. May 20, 2014. Retrieved May 21, 2014.
  16. ^ "GOP Candidate Changes Name to Cesar Chavez". PoliticalWire. June 2, 2014. Retrieved June 2, 2014.
  17. ^ "Despite a passionate defense, Cesar Chavez is tossed from 7th District ballot". Arizona Capitol Times. June 17, 2014. Retrieved June 17, 2014.
  18. ^ "Former White House staffer Ronnie Cho declines an Arizona congressional run". Washington Examiner. April 1, 2014. Retrieved April 2, 2014.
  19. ^ "Former Phoenix Mayor Gordon rules out run for Congress". AZ Central. March 3, 2014. Retrieved March 4, 2014.
  20. ^ Amy B. Wang (March 24, 2014). ".@MRNowakowski just confirmed ..." Twitter. Retrieved March 25, 2014.
  21. ^ "Councilwoman Laura Pastor rules out Congress run". AZ Central. March 13, 2014. Retrieved March 20, 2014.
  22. ^ "I love being your mayor and..." Twitter. February 28, 2014. Retrieved March 4, 2014.
  23. ^ "Rep. Pastor's retirement sets off 'political haboob'". kpho.com. February 28, 2014. Retrieved March 3, 2014.
  24. ^ "Email shows Sinema huddling with top campaign advisers on 'options'". AZ Central. March 1, 2014. Retrieved March 3, 2014.
  25. ^ a b "Sinema Will Run for Re-Election in Current District". Roll Call. March 6, 2014. Retrieved March 6, 2014.
  26. ^ "Daniel Valenzuela not seeking Ed Pastor's U.S. House seat". Phoenix Business Journal. March 27, 2014. Retrieved March 30, 2014.
  27. ^ Livingston, Abby (March 14, 2013). "Arizona: GOP Challenger to Sinema Kicks Off Campaign on Sunday". Roll Call.
  28. ^ Livingston, Abby (April 8, 2013). "Arizona: Ex-ASU Quarterback Files to Challenge Sinema". Roll Call.
  29. ^ Evan Wyloge (February 4, 2014). "Vernon Parker makes Corp Comm candidacy official". Arizona Capitol Times.
  30. ^ a b Livingston, Abby (February 27, 2013). "Farm Team: Arizona Raises Drama, Candidates". Roll Call.

External links[edit]