2016 Nevada Democratic caucuses and convention

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Nevada Democratic caucuses, 2016

← 2008 February 20, 2016 (2016-02-20) 2020 →
  Hillary Clinton by Gage Skidmore 2.jpg Bernie Sanders September 2015 cropped.jpg
Candidate Hillary Clinton Bernie Sanders
Home state New York Vermont
Delegate count 20 15
Percentage 52.64% 47.29%

Nevada Democratic Presidential Caucuses Election Results by County, 2016.svg
Election results by county.
  Hillary Clinton
  Bernie Sanders
  Tie

The 2016 Nevada Democratic caucuses took place on February 20 in the U.S. state of Nevada, traditionally marking the Democratic Party's third nominating contest in their series of presidential primaries ahead of the 2016 presidential election.

The Republican Party held its South Carolina primary on the same day, while their own Nevada caucuses would only take place three days later on February 23.

With all other candidates having dropped out of the race ahead of the Nevada caucuses, the two remaining candidates were Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton.[1]

Process[edit]

Tension arises at the Washoe County Democratic Convention 2016, between Sanders supporters in front and Clinton supporters behind.

Of the total number of 43 delegates the Nevada Democratic Party may send to the 2016 Democratic National Convention, 35 are pledged and 8 are unpledged.

The delegate selection process is a system with three levels:

  1. The first step in the delegate selection process were the precinct caucuses on February 20, which elected about 12,000 delegates to the county conventions.
  2. At the county conventions on April 2, the county delegates selected about 4,000 delegates to the state convention.
  3. At the state convention on May 14–15, the final 35 pledged delegates to the National Convention will be selected. 23 of them are allocated proportionally based on congressional district results, whereas the remaining 12 are allocated based on the state convention as a whole.

State convention[edit]

The state convention was held in May as the final stage of the delegate selection process. Supporters of Sanders were angered when Party officials declined to accept the credentials of close to 60 pro-Sanders delegates. Nevada Democratic Party Chairwoman, Roberta Lange allegedly received numerous death threats and threats to the lives of her family and grandchildren, a criminal investigation has yet to confirm these claims or the identities of those allegedly involved. At the convention, Sanders supporters protested until the hotel canceled the event.[2][3] The event was later criticized as being violent. Senator Barbara Boxer, as a Speaker on the dias, urged Bernie supporters to refrain from their abhorrent behavior, saying as a personal friend of Mr Sanders, he would be appalled, but to no avail. The Nevada State Democratic Party is in possession of video footage from the convention and others in crowd have copies of disturbances committed by Sanders supporters including crushing one of their own against the stage until they passed out, necessitating medical personnel to be called. The Paris Hotel and Casino, where the event was being held was finally forced to call Las Vegas Metro Police to remove Sanders supporters from the property due to their disruptive behavior.[4]

Debates and forums[edit]

October 2015 debate in Las Vegas[edit]

On October 13, 2015, the Democratic Party's very first debate was held at the Wynn Hotel in Las Vegas. Hosted by Anderson Cooper, it aired on CNN and was broadcast on radio by Westwood One. Participants were the candidates Hillary Clinton, Bernie Sanders, Jim Webb, Martin O'Malley, and Lincoln Chafee. It was the first and only debate appearance of Chafee and Webb, who ended their campaigns on October 23 and October 20, respectively.

February 2016 forum in Las Vegas[edit]

On February 18, MSNBC and Telemundo hosted a forum in Las Vegas.

Opinion polling[edit]

Delegate count: 35 Pledged, 8 Unpledged

Winner
America Symbol.svg Hillary Clinton
Caucus date
February 20, 2016
Poll source Date 1st 2nd Other
Caucus results February 20, 2016 Hillary Clinton
52.6%
Bernie Sanders
47.3%
Other
0.1%
Gravis Marketing[5]

Margin of error: ± 4.0
Sample size: 516

February 14–15, 2016 Hillary Clinton
53%
Bernie Sanders
47%
CNN/ORC[6]

Margin of error: ± 6.0
Sample size: 282

February 10–15, 2016 Hillary Clinton
48%
Bernie Sanders
47%
Others / Undecided
6%
Washington Free Beacon/TPC Research[7]

Margin of error: ± 2.9
Sample size: 1,236

February 8–10, 2016 Hillary Clinton
45%
Bernie Sanders
45%
Undecided 9%
Polls in 2015
Poll source Date 1st 2nd 3rd Other
Gravis Marketing

Margin of error: ± 5%
Sample size: 326

December 23–27, 2015 Hillary Clinton
50%
Bernie Sanders
27%
Martin O'Malley
1%
Unsure 16%
CNN/ORC[8]

Margin of error: ± 6%
Sample size: 253

October 3–10, 2015 Hillary Clinton
50%
Bernie Sanders
34%
Joe Biden
12%
Gravis Marketing

Margin of error: ± 5%
Sample size: 416

July 12–13, 2015 Hillary Clinton
55%
Bernie Sanders
18%
Elizabeth Warren
8%
Joe Biden 5%, Lincoln Chafee 1%, Jim Webb 1%, Martin O'Malley 0%, Unsure 12%
Gravis Marketing[9]

Margin of error: ± 6%
Sample size: 324

March 27, 2015 Hillary Clinton
61%
Elizabeth Warren
15%
Bernie Sanders
7%
Joe Biden 3%, Al Gore 3%, Martin O'Malley 1%, Jim Webb 0%, Unsure 10%
Gravis Marketing

Margin of error: ± 6%
Sample size: 324

February 21–22, 2015 Hillary Clinton
58%
Elizabeth Warren
20%
Joe Biden
8%
Bernie Sanders 4%, Jim Webb 3%, Martin O'Malley 0%, Undecided 7%


Results[edit]

Primary date: February 20, 2016
County conventions: April 2, 2016
State convention: May 14, 2016
National delegates: 43

Nevada Democratic caucuses, February 20, 2016
Candidate County delegates Estimated delegates
Count Percentage Pledged Unpledged Total
Hillary Clinton 6,440 52.64% 20 4 24
Bernie Sanders 5,785 47.29% 15 1 16
Uncommitted 8 0.07% 0 3 3
Total 12,233 100% 35 8 43
Source: The Green Papers
Nevada Democratic county conventions, April 2, 2016
Candidate State delegates Estimated delegates
Count Percentage Pledged Unpledged Total
Bernie Sanders 2,124 55.23% 17 1 18
Hillary Clinton 1,722 44.77% 18 4 22
Uncommitted 0 0.00% 0 3 3
Total 100% 35 8 43
Source: The Moderate Voice[10]
Nevada Democratic state conventions, May 14, 2016
Candidate State delegates Estimated delegates
Count Percentage Pledged Unpledged Total
Hillary Clinton 1,695 50.49% 20 4 24
Bernie Sanders 1,662 49.51% 15 1 16
Uncommitted 0 0.00% 0 3 3
Total 100% 35 8 43
Source: Nevada Democrats[11]

Results by county[edit]

County Clinton Votes Sanders Votes
Carson City 49.11% 83 50.89% 86
Churchill 50.00% 46 50.00% 46
Clark 54.82% 4,889 45.14% 4,026
Douglas 54.14% 85 45.86% 72
Elko 43.18% 38 56.82% 50
Esmeralda 31.82% 7 68.18% 15
Eureka 13.64% 3 86.36% 19
Humboldt 33.75% 27 66.25% 53
Lander 28.99% 20 69.57% 48
Lincoln 60.32% 38 39.68% 25
Lyon 47.62% 80 52.38% 88
Mineral 53.42% 39 46.58% 34
Nye 58.75% 94 40.63% 65
Pershing 47.76% 32 49.25% 33
Storey 47.95% 35 52.05% 38
Washoe 45.70% 877 54.25% 1,041
White Pine 50.54% 47 49.46% 46
Total 52.64% 6,440 47.29% 5,785

Source:[12]

Analysis[edit]

Clinton won the popular vote handily in the Nevada caucus, after a rough start to the primary season. With a razor-thin victory in Iowa and a crushing defeat in New Hampshire, Clinton rebounded to a five-point-win in the Silver State aided by late campaigning among casino workers. As The New York Times describes, "At a caucus at the famed Caesars Palace, blackjack dealers, pit bosses, cooks and housekeepers excitedly declared their support for the former secretary of state."[13]

Clinton had campaigned heavily in the state, airing an ad in which she comforted a young Latina girl who was worried her parents would be deported. Clinton's message appeared to resonate with Hispanic and African American voters, with Clinton winning by large margins in many diverse neighborhoods in populous Clark County, especially in caucuses in Las Vegas.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "2016 Candidates". NVDems. 2014-06-20. Retrieved 2016-05-21.
  2. ^ Rappeport, Alen (17 May 2016). "Bernie Sanders Supporters Voice Ire at Nevada Democratic Party". The New York Times. Retrieved 17 May 2016.
  3. ^ Benen, Steve (17 May 2016). "The fallout from Nevada's Democratic unrest". MSNBC. Retrieved 17 May 2016.
  4. ^ LaCapria, Kim (19 May 2016). "The Chair Thrown 'Round the World". Snopes. Retrieved 23 May 2016.
  5. ^ "Nevada Polling Results". Retrieved 2016-02-18.
  6. ^ "Nevada primary: CNN/ORC poll full results" (PDF). Retrieved 2016-02-17.
  7. ^ "Nevada Democratic Caucus Poll" (PDF).
  8. ^ "South Carolina, Nevada CNN polls find Clinton far ahead". Retrieved 2015-10-12.
  9. ^ "Nevada poll: Sandoval early favorite to succeed Reid; Cruz surges to lead pack with Walker". Gravismarketing.com. Retrieved 2015-07-09.
  10. ^ Gill, Kathy (3 April 2016). "What just happened in Nevada? Did Sanders suddenly beat Clinton?". The Moderate Voice. Retrieved 5 April 2016.
  11. ^ "FINAL ALLOCATION OF PLEDGED NATIONAL DELEGATES FOR NV DEMS". Nevada Dem. May 14, 2016. Retrieved May 14, 2016.
  12. ^ http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS/
  13. ^ Chozick, Amy; Healy, Patrick (2016-02-20). "Hillary Clinton Beats Bernie Sanders in Nevada Caucuses". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2016-10-21.