2016 Philippine House of Representatives elections

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2016 Philippine House of Representatives elections

← 2013 May 9, 2016 2019 →

All 297 seats in the House of Representatives of the Philippines
149 seats needed for a majority
  First party Second party Third party
  Philippine House Speaker Feliciano Belmonte.jpg NPC Ronaldo Zamora (cropped).jpg
Leader Feliciano Belmonte, Jr. Jack Duavit Ronaldo Zamora
Party Liberal NPC Nacionalista
Leader's seat Quezon City–4th Rizal-1st San Juan
Last election 113 seats, 39.03% 42 seats, 17.50% 17 seats, 8.53%
Seats before 119 38 26
Seats won 115 42 24
Seat change Decrease 4 Increase 4 Decrease 2
Popular vote 15,403,160 6,344,267 3,512,975
Percentage 41.73% 17.19% 9.52%

  Fourth party Fifth party Sixth party
  Karlo Nograles portrait.jpg UNA Gloria Macapagal Arroyo WEF 2009-crop.jpg
Leader Karlo Nograles Toby Tiangco Gloria Macapagal Arroyo
Party NUP UNA Lakas
Leader's seat Davao City–1st Navotas Pampanga–2nd
Last election 24 seats, 8.59% 10 seats, 11.40% 14 seats, 4.97%
Seats before 26 10 5
Seats won 23 11 4
Seat change Decrease 3 Increase 1 Decrease 1
Popular vote 3,604,266 2,311,859 573,843
Percentage 9.76% 6.26% 1.55%

2016PhilippineHouseElections.png
Election results; map refers to results from congressional districts, with Metro Manila at the inset, while the boxes to the right represent party-list seats.

Speaker before election

Feliciano Belmonte, Jr.
Liberal

Elected Speaker

Pantaleon Alvarez
PDP–Laban

The 2016 Philippine House of Representatives elections were the 34th lower house elections in the Philippines. They were held on May 9, 2016 to elect members to the House of Representatives of the Philippines. The winning candidates were to comprise the House's contingent in the 17th Congress of the Philippines that would serve from June 30, 2016 to June 30, 2019.

The House of Representatives elections were part of the 2016 general election where elections for President, Vice President, Senators, and all local officials, including those from the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao, were also held.

The Philippines uses parallel voting in its lower house elections. There are 297 seats in the House; 238 of these are district representatives, and 59 are party-list representatives. The law mandates that there should be one party-list representative for every four district representatives. District representatives are elected under the plurality voting system from single-member districts. Party-list representatives are elected via the nationwide vote with a 2% "soft" election threshold, with a 3-seat cap. The party in the party-list election with the most votes usually wins three seats, the other parties with more than 2% of the vote two seats, and the parties with less than 2% of the vote winning a seat each if the 20% quota is not met.

Electoral system[edit]

The election for seats in the House of Representatives is done via parallel voting. A voter has two votes: one for one's local district, and another via the party-list system. A candidate is not allowed to stand for both ballots, and parties participating in the district elections would have to ask for permission on the Commission on Elections, with major parties not allowed to participate, in the party-list election.

Election via the districts[edit]

Each district sends one representative to the House of Representatives, with the winner having the highest number of votes winning that district's seat. The representatives from the districts comprise at most 80% of the seats.

Election via the party-list system[edit]

In the party-list system, the parties contesting the election represent a sector, or several sectors, or an ethnic group. In determining the winners, the entire country is treated as one "district". Each party that surpasses the 2% election threshold automatically wins one seat, they can win an additional number of seats in proportion to the number of votes they received, but they can't have more than three seats. The representatives elected via the party-list system, also known as "sectoral representatives" should comprise at least 20% of the seats. However, since the winners from the parties that surpass the 2% threshold had not reached the 20% quota ever since the party-list system was instituted, the parties that received less than 2% of the first preference vote are given one seat each until the 20% quota has been filled up.[1]

Campaigning[edit]

The parties contesting the district elections campaign at the district level; there is no national-level campaigning. While no party has been able to win a majority of seats in the House of Representatives since the 1987 elections, the party of the incumbent president had usually controlled the chamber in the phenomenon known locally as the "Padrino System" or patronage politics, with other parties aligning themselves with the president's policies in exchange for pork barrel and future political favors.

Usually, a gubernatorial candidate has a slate of candidates for vice governor, board members and representative. He or she, aside from supporting a slate of national politicians, may also have slates in the individual cities or towns for mayors, vice mayors and councilors. These slates are usually under one party, but multi-party alliances are not uncommon.

District changes[edit]

Reapportioning (redistricting) the number of seats is either via national reapportionment after the release of every census, or via piecemeal redistricting for every province or city. National reapportionment has not happened since the 1987 constitution took effect, and aside from piecemeal redistricting, the apportionment was based on the ordinance from the constitution, which was in turn based from the 1980 census.

These are currently 5 new districts that shall be contested in 2016:

These are House (HB) and Senate (SB) Bills that pertains to redistricting:

Bill No. District(s) Current Proposed Notes Status
15th Congress
HB 4451 Davao del Sur–2nd 1 1 Separation of a part of Davao del Sur's 2nd district to become a province of Davao Occidental, with the rest absorbed by the 1st district. Signed into law–Republic Act No. 10360; approved in a plebiscite[2]
16th Congress
HB 112 Aklan 1 2 Aklan to be split into two districts. Substituted by HB 5768.
HB 608 Pasay 1 2 Pasay to be split into two districts. Pending at the committee level.
HB 836 Laguna–4th 1 2 Laguna−4th to be split into two districts; new district shall become the 5th district. Pending at the committee level.
HB 1687 Both Sorsogon districts 1 1 Transfer of Juban from the 2nd to the 1st district. Pending at the committee level.
HB 1696 Surigao del Sur 2 3 Surigao del Sur to be redistricted into three districts. Pending at the committee level.
HB 2734 Pampanga–3rd 1 2 Separation of San Fernando to become a lone district. Substituted by HB 6140.
HB 3718 Nueva Ecija–2nd 1 2 Nueva Ecija−2nd to be split into two districts; new district shall become the 5th district. Pending at the committee level.
HB 3750 Batangas–2nd 1 2 Separation of Batangas City to become a lone district. Signed into law–Republic Act No. 10673.[3]
HB 3917 Laguna–1st 1 2 Separation of Biñan to become a lone district. Signed into law–Republic Act No. 10658[4]
HB 3930 All districts 232 Unspecified General reapportionment of all districts Pending at the committee level.
HB 4350 Pampanga–1st 1 2 Separation of Angeles to become a lone district. Pending at the committee level.
HB 4427 Cebu–2nd 1 2 Cebu−2nd to be split into two districts; new district shall become the 7th district. Signed into law–Republic Act No. 10684.[5]
HB 4457 Maguindanao–1st 1 2 Separation of Cotabato City to become a lone district. Pending at the committee level.
HB 4603 San Jose del Monte 1 2 San Jose del Monte to be split into two districts. Pending at the committee level.
HB 4640 Batangas–4th 1 2 Separation of Lipa to become a lone district. Signed into law–Republic Act No. 10673[3]
HB 5002 Taguig−1st & Pateros 1 2 Separation of Pateros to become a lone district, and granting it cityhood Pending at the committee level.
HB 5569 Caloocan−1st 1 3 Caloocan−1st to split into three districts, with the new districts comprising the third and fourth districts. Pending at the committee level.
HB 5768 Aklan 1 2 Aklan to be split into two districts. Approved on third reading; transmitted to the Senate.
HB 6140 Pampanga–3rd 1 2 Separation of Angeles to become a lone district. Approved on first reading.
SB 3029 Laguna–1st 1 2 Separation of San Pedro to become a lone district. Pending at the committee level.
Approved districts 5 Potential new districts (16th Congress only) ~17

Retiring and term limited incumbents[edit]

There are 69 open seats in the House from incumbents that are term-limited and were not running.

Results[edit]

2016 Philippine House congressional district elections chart of votes (inner ring) compared to seats won (outer ring).

President Benigno Aquino III's Liberal Party emerged with the party having the plurality of seats in the House of Representatives, winning more than a hundred seats. Meanwhile, in the presidential election, Davao City mayor Rodrigo Duterte of Partido Demokratiko Pilipino-Lakas ng Bayan (PDP-Laban) emerged with an insurmountable lead over the Liberals' Mar Roxas.

Meanwhile, the Nationalist People's Coalition finished second in number of seats won, followed by the Nacionalista Party, National Unity Party, United Nationalist Alliance, Lakas-CMD, PDP-Laban, Laban ng Demokratikong Pilipino and Aksyon Demokratiko. Several local parties also won seats, along with a handful of independents.

While PDP-Laban just won three seats, several members of the Liberal Party immediately abandoned that party in favor of PDP-Laban. PDP-Laban also signed coalition agreements with all major parties, including the Liberal Party, ensuring that they would have the numbers once the 17th Congress of the Philippines opens in late July.

District Party-list
115 42 24 23 34 25 34
Liberal NPC NP NUP Others 2+ seats 1 seat

Congressional districts results[edit]

e • d Summary of the May 9, 2016 Philippine House of Representatives election results for representatives from congressional districts
Party/coalition Popular vote Breakdown Seats
Total % Swing Entered Up Gains Holds Losses Vacant wins Elected % +/−
Liberal (Liberal Party) 15,552,401 41.72% Increase 3.41% 164 111 15 96 15 4 115 38.7% Increase 4
NPC (Nationalist People's Coalition) 6,350,310 17.04% Decrease 0.32% 77 42 8 33 9 0 42 14.1% Steady
NUP (National Unity Party) 3,604,266 9.67% Increase 0.98% 39 26 1 22 4 0 23 7.7% Decrease 3
Nacionalista (Nationalist Party) 3,512,975 9.42% Increase 0.87% 46 27 3 21 6 0 24 8.1% Decrease 3
UNA (United Nationalist Alliance) 2,468,335 6.62% Decrease 2.69% 47 8 4 7 1 0 11 3.7% Increase 3
PDP-Laban (Philippine Democratic Party–People's Power) 706,407 1.90% Increase 0.88% 26 0 3 0 0 0 3 1.0% Increase 3
Lakas (People Power–Christian Muslim Democrats) 573,843 1.54% Decrease 3.79% 5 7 0 4 3 0 4 1.3% Decrease 3
Aksyon (Democratic Action) 514,612 1.38% Increase 1.03% 8 1 1 0 1 0 1 0.3% Steady
KBL (New Society Movement) 198,754 0.53% Increase 0.19% 11 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0% Steady
Asenso Manileño (Progress for Manilans) 184,602 0.50% Increase 0.50% 4 0 2 0 0 0 2 0.7% Increase 2
Kusog Baryohanon (Force of the Villagers) 172,601 0.46% Increase 0.46% 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 0.3% Steady
PTM (Voice of the Masses Party) 145,417 0.39% Increase 0.39% 2 1 0 1 0 0 1 0.3% Steady
PCM (People's Champ Movement) 142,307 0.38% Increase 0.38% 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0.3% Increase 1
Bukidnon Paglaum (Hope for Bukidnon) 129,678 0.35% Decrease 0.01% 1 1 0 1 0 0 1 0.3% Steady
Lingap Lugud (Caring Love) 127,762 0.34% Increase 0.34% 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 0.3% Increase 1
Padayon Pilipino (Onward Filipinos) 127,759 0.34% Increase 0.34% 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0% Steady
1-Cebu (One Cebu) 114,732 0.31% Increase 0.23% 3 1 0 0 1 0 0 0.0% Decrease 1
LDP (Struggle of Democratic Filipinos) 111,086 0.30% Decrease 0.03% 2 2 0 2 0 0 2 0.7% Steady
Arangkada San Joseño (Forward San Joseans) 83,945 0.23% Increase 0.23% 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 0.3% Increase 1
PMP (Force of the Filipino Masses) 78,020 0.21% Decrease 0.31% 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0% Steady
KABAKA (Partner of the Nation for Progress) 72,130 0.19% Decrease 0.15% 2 1 0 1 0 0 1 0.3% Steady
Hugpong (Party of the People of the City) 53,186 0.14% Decrease 0.10% 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0% Steady
SZP (Forward Zambales Party) 52,415 0.14% Decrease 0.08% 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0% Steady
CDP (Centrist Democratic Party of the Philippines) 13,662 0.21% Decrease 0.21% 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0.0% Decrease 1
PMM (Workers' and Peasants' Party) 7,239 0.02% Decrease 0.02% 5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0% Steady
PGRP (Philippine Green Republican Party) 4,426 0.01% Increase 0.01% 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.0% Steady
Independent 2,172,562 5.83% Decrease 0.19% 178 3 3 1 2 0 4 1.3% Increase 1
Vacancy 3 0 0 3 0 0.0% Decrease 3
Total 37,275,432 100% N/A 634 234 45 189 45 4 238 80.1% Increase 4
Valid votes 37,275,432 83.97%
Invalid votes 7,077,692 15.94%
Turnout 44,392,375 81.66% Increase 5.89%
Registered voters (without overseas voters) 54,363,844 100% Increase 4.52%
Vote share
Liberal
41.72%
NPC
17.04%
NUP
9.67%
Nacionalista
9.42%
UNA
6.62%
Others
15.53%
Congressional district seats
Liberal
48.32%
NPC
17.65%
Nacionalista
10.08%
NUP
9.66%
UNA
4.62%
Others
9.67%

Party-list result[edit]

Coat of arms of the Philippines.svg
This article is part of a series on the
politics and government of
the Philippines

The winning party-lists were proclaimed on May 19. The commission proclaimed 46 party-lists, with Ako Bicol winning the maximum three seats, while parties with at least 2% of the vote being guaranteed at least 1 seat.[6] Eleven parties won 2 seats each, while 34 others won one seat each.[7]

Ako Bicol won three seats for the second time in history, after achieving the same feat in 2010. Bayan Muna, on the other hand, failed to win at least 2 seats for the first time, after winning the maximum three seats in 2001, 2004 and 2007.

e • d Summary of the May 9, 2016 Philippine House of Representatives election results for party-list representatives
Party Popular vote Seats
Total % Swing Up Won +/−
Ako Bicol 1,664,975 5.14% Increase 2.38% 2 3 Increase 1
GABRIELA 1,367,795 4.22% Increase 1.64% 2 2 Steady
1-PACMAN 1,310,197 4.05% Increase 4.05% 0 2 Increase 2
ACT Teachers 1,180,752 3.65% Increase 2.00% 1 2 Increase 1
Senior Citizens 988,876 3.05% Increase 0.60% 0 2 Increase 2
Kabayan 840,393 2.60% Increase 2.60% 0 2 Increase 2
Agri 833,821 2.58% Increase 1.25% 1 2 Increase 1
PBA 780,309 2.41% Increase 1.64% 0 2 Increase 2
Buhay 760,912 2.35% Decrease 2.25% 3 2 Decrease 1
Abono 732,060 2.26% Decrease 0.52% 2 2 Steady
AMIN 706,689 2.18% Increase 0.80% 1 2 Increase 1
Coop-NATCCO 671,699 2.07% Decrease 0.25% 2 2 Steady
Akbayan 608,449 1.88% Decrease 1.12% 2 1 Decrease 1
Bayan Muna 606,566 1.87% Decrease 1.58% 2 1 Decrease 1
AGAP 593,748 1.83% Decrease 0.31% 2 1 Decrease 1
An Waray 590,895 1.82% Decrease 0.13% 2 1 Decrease 1
CIBAC 555,760 1.72% Decrease 0.40% 2 1 Decrease 1
AAMBIS-Owa 495,483 1.53% Increase 0.40% 1 1 Steady
Kalinga 494,725 1.53% Increase 0.18% 1 1 Steady
A TEACHER 475,488 1.47% Decrease 2.31% 2 1 Decrease 1
YACAP 471,173 1.46% Increase 0.13% 1 1 Steady
DIWA 467,794 1.44% Increase 0.21% 1 1 Steady
TUCP 467,275 1.44% Increase 0.11% 1 1 Steady
Abang Lingkod 466,701 1.44% Increase 0.50% 1 1 Steady
LPGMA 466,103 1.44% Increase 0.10% 1 1 Steady
Alona 434,856 1.34% Increase 1.34% 0 1 Increase 1
1-SAGIP 397,064 1.23% Increase 0.18% 1 1 Steady
Butil 395,011 1.22% Decrease 0.37% 1 1 Steady
ACTS-OFW 374,601 1.16% Increase 1.16% 0 1 Increase 1
Anakpawis 367,376 1.13% Decrease 0.03% 1 1 Steady
Ang Kabuhayan 348,533 1.08% Increase 1.08% 0 1 Increase 1
ANGKLA 337,245 1.04% Decrease 0.26% 1 1 Steady
Mata 331,285 1.02% Increase 0.14% 0 1 Increase 1
1-CARE 329,627 1.02% Decrease 2.37% 2 1 Decrease 1
ANAC-IP 318,257 0.98% Increase 0.11% 1 1 Steady
ABS 301,457 0.93% Decrease 0.37% 1 1 Steady
Kabataan 300,420 0.93% Decrease 0.31% 1 1 Steady
BH 299,381 0.92% Increase 0.24% 0 1 Increase 1
AASENSO 294,281 0.91% Increase 0.67% 0 1 Increase 1
SBP 280,465 0.87% Increase 0.87% 0 1 Increase 1
Magdalo 279,356 0.86% Decrease 1.19% 2 1 Decrease 1
1-ang Edukasyon 278,393 0.86% Increase 0.86% 0 1 Increase 1
Manila Teachers 268,613 0.83% Increase 0.83% 0 1 Increase 1
Kusug Tausug 247,487 0.76% Increase 0.76% 0 1 Increase 1
Aangat Tayo 243,266 0.75% Decrease 0.00% 0 1 Increase 1
Agbiag! 240,723 0.74% Decrease 0.13% 1 1 Steady
Ating Guro 237,566 0.73% Decrease 0.04% 0 0 Steady
ADDA 226,751 0.70% Increase 0.70% 0 0 Steady
A.I. 223,880 0.69% Increase 0.69% 0 0 Steady
All-Fish 220,599 0.68% Increase 0.68% 0 0 Steady
Append 219,218 0.68% Decrease 0.18% 1 0 Decrease 1
Ang Nars 218,593 0.68% Decrease 0.21% 1 0 Decrease 1
ABAKADA 216,405 0.67% Decrease 0.22% 1 0 Decrease 1
CONSLA 213,814 0.66% Increase 0.66% 0 0 Steady
Tingog Sinirangan 210,552 0.65% Increase 0.65% 0 0 Steady
ABAMIN 209,276 0.65% Decrease 1.04% 1 0 Decrease 1
OFW Family 203,767 0.63% Decrease 2.09% 2 0 Decrease 2
Anakalusugan 191,362 0.59% Increase 0.59% 0 0 Steady
Alay Buhay 186,712 0.58% Decrease 0.57% 1 0 Decrease 1
Abante Retirees 166,138 0.51% Decrease 0.07% 0 0 Steady
AAB 162,547 0.50% Increase 0.50% 0 0 Steady
AVE 157,792 0.49% Decrease 0.49% 1 0 Decrease 1
RAM 153,743 0.47% Increase 0.47% 0 0 Steady
KGB 148,869 0.46% Increase 0.46% 0 0 Steady
AGHAM 140,661 0.43% Decrease 0.04% 0 0 Steady
AWAT Mindanao 138,040 0.43% Increase 0.28% 0 0 Steady
Tama 136,555 0.42% Increase 0.42% 0 0 Steady
Asean, Inc. 125,069 0.39% Increase 0.39% 0 0 Steady
Amepa Ofw 121,086 0.37% Increase 0.37% 0 0 Steady
ATING Koop 120,361 0.37% Decrease 0.60% 1 0 Decrease 1
Ang Kasangga 120,042 0.37% Decrease 0.36% 0 0 Steady
UMALAB KA 118,149 0.36% Increase 0.20% 0 0 Steady
Disabled/PWD 118,043 0.36% Increase 0.36% 0 0 Steady
Global 117,552 0.36% Increase 0.36% 0 0 Steady
ALE 112,052 0.35% Decrease 0.21% 0 0 Steady
Cancer 109,965 0.34% Increase 0.34% 0 0 Steady
ACT-CIS 109,300 0.34% Decrease 1.03% 1 0 Decrease 1
AMA 102,583 0.32% Decrease 0.57% 1 0 Decrease 1
Marino 102,430 0.32% Increase 0.32% 0 0 Steady
1-PABAHAY 100,746 0.31% Decrease 0.11% 0 0 Steady
Metro 94,515 0.29% Increase 0.29% 0 0 Steady
PISTON 89,384 0.28% Decrease 0.36% 0 0 Steady
Sanlakas 87,351 0.27% Decrease 0.04% 0 0 Steady
TGP 87,009 0.27% Increase 0.27% 0 0 Steady
KAP/KAKASA-KA 79,178 0.24% Increase 0.24% 0 0 Steady
Migrante 76,523 0.24% Increase 0.05% 0 0 Steady
Amor-seaman 68,226 0.21% Increase 0.21% 0 0 Steady
1-AALALAY 65,459 0.20% Decrease 0.39% 0 0 Steady
Sinag 61,393 0.19% Increase 0.19% 0 0 Steady
Akin 56,809 0.18% Increase 0.18% 0 0 Steady
1-AHAPO 54,550 0.17% Increase 0.17% 0 0 Steady
Ang Prolife 53,078 0.16% Decrease 0.31% 0 0 Steady
Samako 52,251 0.16% Increase 0.16% 0 0 Steady
Tricap 50,401 0.16% Increase 0.16% 0 0 Steady
UNIDO 49,742 0.15% Increase 0.15% 0 0 Steady
Clase 49,212 0.15% Increase 0.15% 0 0 Steady
Tinderong Pinoy 46,942 0.14% Increase 0.14% 0 0 Steady
Pbb 46,853 0.14% Increase 0.14% 0 0 Steady
Kamais Pilipinas 46,521 0.14% Increase 0.14% 0 0 Steady
1-GB 46,182 0.14% Increase 0.14% 0 0 Steady
KMM 42,935 0.13% Increase 0.13% 0 0 Steady
PM 42,742 0.13% Increase 0.13% 0 0 Steady
KM Ngayon Na 39,777 0.12% Increase 0.12% 0 0 Steady
FICTAP 36,619 0.11% Increase 0.11% 0 0 Steady
ACP 35,270 0.11% Increase 0.11% 0 0 Steady
Banat 31,185 0.10% Increase 0.10% 0 0 Steady
A Tambay 30,147 0.09% Increase 0.09% 0 0 Steady
Awake 28,727 0.09% Increase 0.09% 0 0 Steady
Nactodap 24,407 0.08% Increase 0.08% 0 0 Steady
Anupa 18,793 0.06% Increase 0.06% 0 0 Steady
Melchora 17,040 0.05% Increase 0.05% 0 0 Steady
1-ABILIDAD 16,805 0.05% Decrease 0.02% 0 0 Steady
MTM PHILS 9,200 0.03% Decrease 0.12% 0 0 Steady
CWS 9,121 0.03% Increase 0.03% 0 0 Steady
Dumper PTDA 6,941 0.02% Increase 0.02% 0 0 Steady
Total 32,377,841 100.00% N/A 56 59 Increase 3
Valid votes 32,377,841 71.98% Increase 3.15%
Invalid votes 12,601,310 28.02% Decrease 3.15%
Total turnout 44,980,362* 80.70% Increase 4.93%
Registered voters 55,739,911 100.00% Increase 5.21%

*1,211 votes are unaccounted for.

Vote share
Ako Bikol
5.14%
Gabriela
4.22%
1-PACMAN
4.05%
ACT Teachers
3.65%
Senior Citizens
3.05%
Kabayan
2.60%
AGRI
2.58%
PBA
2.41%
Buhay
2.35%
Abono
2.26%
AMIN
2.18%
Coop-NATCCO
2.07%
Akbayan
1.88%
Others
61.51%
Congressional sectoral seats
Ako Bikol
5.08%
Gabriela
3.39%
1-PACMAN
3.39%
ACT Teachers
3.39%
Senior Citizens
3.39%
Kabayan
3.39%
AGRI
3.39%
PBA
3.39%
Buhay
3.39%
Abono
3.39%
AMIN
3.39%
Coop-NATCCO
3.39%
Akbayan
1.69%
Others
55.93%

Summary[edit]

Region Details Seats won per party Total seats
Liberal Nacionalista NPC NUP UNA Others & ind.
I Elections
6 / 12
2 / 12
3 / 12
0 / 12
0 / 12
1 / 12
12 / 297
II Elections
4 / 10
1 / 10
2 / 10
2 / 10
1 / 10
0 / 10
10 / 297
III Elections
7 / 21
1 / 21
5 / 21
3 / 21
1 / 21
4 / 21
21 / 297
IV–A Elections
14 / 26
2 / 26
4 / 26
3 / 26
2 / 26
1 / 26
26 / 297
IV–B Elections
4 / 8
1 / 8
1 / 8
2 / 8
0 / 8
0 / 8
8 / 297
V Elections
9 / 16
2 / 16
4 / 16
1 / 16
0 / 16
0 / 16
16 / 297
VI Elections
7 / 11
0 / 11
2 / 11
2 / 11
0 / 11
0 / 11
11 / 297
VII Elections
6 / 14
2 / 14
3 / 14
1 / 14
1 / 14
1 / 14
14 / 297
VIII Elections
7 / 12
0 / 12
2 / 12
2 / 12
0 / 12
1 / 12
12 / 297
IX Elections
4 / 9
1 / 9
3 / 9
0 / 9
0 / 9
1 / 9
9 / 297
X Elections
6 / 14
2 / 14
2 / 14
1 / 14
1 / 14
2 / 14
14 / 297
XI Elections
5 / 11
3 / 11
0 / 11
1 / 11
0 / 11
2 / 11
11 / 297
XII Elections
4 / 8
0 / 8
2 / 8
0 / 8
0 / 8
2 / 8
8 / 297
XIII Elections
4 / 9
0 / 9
2 / 9
2 / 9
0 / 9
1 / 9
9 / 297
ARMM Elections
6 / 8
0 / 8
0 / 8
1 / 8
0 / 8
1 / 8
8 / 297
CAR Elections
5 / 7
1 / 7
1 / 7
0 / 7
0 / 7
0 / 7
7 / 297
NCR Elections
15 / 32
4 / 32
3 / 32
0 / 32
5 / 32
5 / 32
32 / 297
NIR Elections
2 / 10
0 / 10
5 / 10
2 / 10
0 / 10
1 / 10
10 / 297
Party-list Elections
1 / 59
0 / 59
0 / 59
0 / 59
0 / 59
58 / 59
59 / 297
Total
117 / 297
24 / 297
42 / 297
23 / 297
11 / 297
91 / 297
297 / 297

Defeated incumbents[edit]

District representatives[edit]

District Incumbent's party Incumbent Winner Winner's party Notes
Aklan Nacionalista Teodorico Haresco, Jr. Carlito Marquez NPC
Baguio Liberal Nicasio Aliping Mark Go Nacionalista
Bulacan–3rd Liberal Jonjon Mendoza Lorna Silverio NUP
Leyte–2nd Liberal Sergio Apostol Henry Ong NPC
Northern Samar–1st Nacionalista Harlin Abayon Raul Daza Liberal After defeating Daza in 2013 by 52 votes, Abayon lost by 90 votes. Daza had successfully petitioned to the House of Representatives Electoral Tribunal, ousting Abayon, but the Supreme Court ordered the reinstatement of Abayon. The House leadership did not act on the court's order in time after the adjournment sine die.[8]
Palawan–3rd Liberal Douglas Hagedorn Gil Acosta NPC
Pampanga–1st Liberal Yeng Guiao Carmelo Lazatin Lingap Lugud
Quezon City–1st Liberal Boy Calalay Vincent Crisologo UNA Calalay defeated Crisologo in 2013.
Siquijor Liberal Marie Anne Pernes Ramon Vicente Rocamora Independent
Zamboanga City–2nd Nacionalista Lilia Macrohon-Nuño Manuel Dalipe NPC
Zamboanga Sibugay–1st Nacionalista Belma Cabilao Wilter Palma II Liberal

Party-list representatives[edit]

Aftermath[edit]

After proclamations were held for district representatives, three people were seen to have a chance in becoming speaker. These include PDP-Laban's Pantaleon Alvarez of Davao del Norte, National Unity Party (NUP)'s Karlo Nograles of Davao City, and incumbent speaker Feliciano Belmonte, Jr. of Quezon City.[9]

Duterte chose PDP-Laban's Alvarez, a returning congressman, over Nograles as his preferred candidate for the speakership. Nograles gave way to Alvarez, to secure a "super majority" in Congress, while keeping the minority bloc to about 20 members.[10]

Alvarez and defeated senatorial candidate Ferdinand Martin Romualdez, chairman of the Lakas-CMD, signed an agreement formalizing their parties' alliance. The Nacionalista Party (NP) also joined the alliance with the PDP-Laban; Duterte's running mate, Senator Alan Peter Cayetano, although ran as an independent, is a member of the Nacionalista Party. The Nationalist People's Coalition (NPC) have also contacted Alvarez about the speakership election, while Alvarez described a coalition with the NUP as a "done deal".[11]

The incumbent speaker, the Liberals' Feliciano Belmonte, Jr. of Quezon City expects the support of at least 120 members of the Liberal Party and allies from other parties. Meanwhile, Alvarez hosted a luncheon at the Midas Hotel and Casino on May 18 where 59 representatives attended. Alvarez said that his "Coalition for Change" includes representatives from the PDP-Laban, the NP, NPC, NUP, Lakas, various party-lists, and even from the Liberal Party.[12]

Days after the Alvarez luncheon, Belmonte conceded the speakership race, saying that Alvarez had the numbers. Alvarez visited Belmonte's home in Quezon City to pave way for a smooth transition of power in the lower house. This was after the NPC affirmed its support for PDP-Laban.[13] Meanwhile, outgoing Majority Leader Neptali Gonzales II said that there are some Liberal representatives who won't jump ship to PDP-Laban, but would still vote for Alvarez for the speakership, with the Liberals signing the same coalition agreement with the NPC, which the latter also signed with PDP-Laban.[14]

Danilo Suarez of Quezon, who ran under the United Nationalist Alliance (UNA) emerged as Belmonte's primary opponent for the minority leader position. Suarez says he has the support of some 17 lawmakers from UNA, Lakas-CMD, and party-list representatives allied with the former.[15] While this is happening, the NUP and Lakas announced a coalition that would support Duterte in the lower house, and backed the election of Alvarez for the speakership.[16]

Alvarez spent the remainder of May consolidating the pro-Duterte forces in the House of Representatives. Belmonte seemed content to lead the opposition in the lower house, rather than joining the majority bloc, saying that "we must have a minority. That's needed."[17] At least 23 representatives abandoned the Liberal Party for PDP-Laban.[18] Meanwhile, the NUP signed a coalition agreement with PDP-Laban, joining the Coalition for Change.[19]

Speakership election[20]
Candidate Party Total %
Pantaleon Alvarez PDP–Laban 252 84.8%
Teodoro Baguilat, Jr. Liberal 8 2.7%
Danilo Suarez Lakas 7 2.4%
Abstention 22 7.4%
Total who voted 288 97.3%
Total representatives 297 100%

References[edit]

  1. ^ Muga, Felix P. II (May 20, 2013). "How to fill the 58 party-list seats". Rappler.com. Retrieved May 23, 2013.
  2. ^ Carillo, C.A. (November 10, 2013). "Davao Occidental province to be created". BusinessWorld. Retrieved January 27, 2016.
  3. ^ a b Cinco, Maricar (August 24, 2015). "Batangas has 2 new legislative districts". Philippine Daily Inquirer. Retrieved May 19, 2016.
  4. ^ Romero, Paolo (April 2, 2015). "Biñan now a congressional district". Retrieved May 19, 2016.
  5. ^ Braga, Michael Vencynth H. (September 19, 2015). "Aquino approves Cebu's 7th district". The Freeman. Retrieved May 19, 2016.
  6. ^ Adel, Rossette (May 19, 2016). "Comelec proclaims 46 winning party-lists". The Philippine Star. Retrieved May 19, 2016.
  7. ^ "46 groups proclaimed as party list winners". Rappler. Retrieved May 19, 2016.
  8. ^ Pasion, Patty (June 6, 2016). "Northern Samar's Abayon escorted out of Congress". Rappler. Retrieved June 6, 2016.
  9. ^ Cabucungan, Gil C.; Salaverria, Leila B. "3-way fight seen for House Speaker". Philippine Daily Inquirer. Retrieved May 23, 2016.
  10. ^ "Digong's party eyes Alvarez as Speaker". Philippine Daily Inquirer. May 16, 2016. Retrieved May 19, 2016.
  11. ^ Cayabyab, Marc Jayson (May 18, 2016). "Alvarez bolsters Speaker bid with 80 lawmakers, 3-party alliance". Philippine Daily Inquirer. Retrieved May 19, 2016.
  12. ^ Romero, Paolo (May 19, 2016). "Lines drawn in battle for House speaker's post". The Philippine Star. Retrieved May 19, 2016.
  13. ^ Romero, Paolo. "Belmonte: Alvarez to become speaker". The Philippine Star (2016-05–21). Retrieved May 23, 2016.
  14. ^ Cayabyab, Marc Jayson. "LP backs Alvarez's Speaker bid". Philippine Daily Inquirer (2016-05–23). Retrieved May 23, 2016.
  15. ^ Dalangin-Fernandez, Lira. "House minority leadership still a toss-up between Belmonte and Suarez". Interaksyon.com (2016-05–23). Retrieved May 23, 2016.
  16. ^ Cahinhinan, John Carlo. "Lakas, NUP form alliance to support Duterte". Sun.Star Manila (2016-05–23). Retrieved May 23, 2016.
  17. ^ Vigilia, Wendell. "Belmonte resigned to leading minority". Malaya (2016-06–01). Retrieved June 2, 2016.
  18. ^ Panti, Llanesca T. "LP stalwarts join Duterte party". The Manila Times (2016-06–02). Retrieved June 2, 2016.
  19. ^ Cruz, Maricel (June 3, 2016). "NUP seals alliance with PDP-Laban". CNN Philippines. Retrieved June 2, 2016.
  20. ^ "'Supermajority' backs Alvarez as House speaker". Philippine Star. July 25, 2016. Retrieved October 23, 2016.