2016 United States House of Representatives elections in West Virginia

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United States House of Representatives elections in West Virginia, 2016

← 2014 November 8, 2016 (2016-11-08) 2018 →

West Virginia's three seats
to the United States House of Representatives
  Majority party Minority party
 
Party Republican Democratic
Last election 3 0
Seats won 3 0
Seat change Steady Steady
Popular vote 445,017 224,449
Percentage 64.84% 32.70%
Swing Increase9.58% Decrease8.83%

The 2016 United States House of Representatives elections in West Virginia were held on November 8, 2016, to elect the three U.S. Representatives from the state of West Virginia, one from each of the state's three congressional districts. The elections coincided with the 2016 U.S. presidential election, as well as other elections to the House of Representatives, elections to the United States Senate and various state and local elections.

The primaries were held on May 10.

District 1[edit]

The 1st district was located in northern West Virginia and consisted of Barbour, Brooke, Doddridge, Gilmer, Grant, Hancock, Harrison, Marion, Marshall, Mineral, Monongalia, Ohio, Pleasants, Preston, Ritchie, Taylor, Tucker, Tyler, Wetzel, and Wood counties, including the cities of Parkersburg, Morgantown, Wheeling, Weirton, Fairmont, and Clarksburg.

The incumbent was Republican David McKinley, who had represented the 1st district since 2011. McKinley expressed an interest in running for Governor of West Virginia,[1] but announced that he would run for re-election to the U.S. House.[2]

Former State Delegate Mike Manypenny won the Democratic nomination.[3]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates

Results[edit]

Democratic primary results[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Mike Manypenny 60,911 100.0
Total votes 60,911 100.0

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates

Results[edit]

Republican primary results[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican David McKinley (incumbent) 61,217 100.0
Total votes 61,217 100.0

General election[edit]

Results[edit]

West Virginia's 1st congressional district, 2016[5]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican David McKinley (incumbent) 163,469 69.0
Democratic Mike Manypenny 73,534 31.0
Total votes 237,003 100.0
Republican hold

District 2[edit]

The 2nd district was located in central West Virginia and consisted of Berkeley, Braxton, Calhoun, Clay, Hampshire, Hardy, Jackson, Jefferson, Kanawha, Lewis, Morgan, Pendleton, Putnam, Randolph, Roane, Upshur, and Wirt counties, including the cities of Charleston and Martinsburg.

The incumbent was Republican Alex Mooney, who had represented the 2nd district since 2015. He defeated Marc Savitt in the Republican primary on May 10, 2016.[6]

Mark Hunt, a former Democratic state representative, won the Democratic primary.[7]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates
  • Mark Hunt, former Democratic State Representative
  • Cory Simpson
  • Harvey D. Peyton
  • Robert "Robin" Wilson, Jr.
  • Tom Payne

Results[edit]

Democratic primary results[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Mark Hunt 21,296 29.1
Democratic Cory Simpson 19,180 26.2
Democratic Tom Payne 15,250 20.8
Democratic Harvey D. Peyton 11,143 15.2
Democratic Robert "Robin" Wilson, Jr. 6,344 8.7
Total votes 73,213 100.0

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates

Results[edit]

Map showing the results of the 2016 election in West Virginia's second congressional district by County.
Republican primary results[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Alex Mooney (incumbent) 45,839 73.1
Republican Marc Savitt 16,849 26.9
Total votes 62,688 100.0

General election[edit]

Results[edit]

West Virginia's 2nd congressional district, 2016[5]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Alex Mooney (incumbent) 140,807 58.2
Democratic Mark Hunt 101,207 41.8
Total votes 242,014 100.0
Republican hold

District 3[edit]

The 3rd district was located in southern West Virginia and consisted of Boone, Cabell, Fayette, Greenbrier, Lincoln, Logan, Mason, McDowell, Mercer, Mingo, Monroe, Nicholas, Pocahontas, Raleigh, Summers, Wayne, Webster, and Wyoming counties, including the cities of Huntington and Beckley.

The incumbent was Republican Evan Jenkins, who had represented the 3rd district since 2015. Former United States Secret Service agent Matt Detch was the Democratic nominee.

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates
  • Matt Detch

Results[edit]

Democratic primary results[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Matt Detch 53,703 100.0
Total votes 53,703 100.0

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates

Results[edit]

Map showing the results of the 2016 election in West Virginia's third congressional district by County.
Republican primary results[4]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Evan Jenkins (incumbent) 41,162 100.0
Total votes 41,162 100.0

General election[edit]

Results[edit]

West Virginia's 3rd congressional district, 2016[5]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Evan Jenkins (incumbent) 140,741 67.9
Democratic Matt Detch 49,708 24.0
Libertarian Zane Lawhorn 16,883 8.1
Total votes 207,332 100.0
Republican hold

References[edit]

  1. ^ Johnson, Shauna (March 20, 2015). "McKinley "seriously considering" gubernatorial run in 2016". West Virginia MetroNews. Retrieved April 29, 2015.
  2. ^ Hicks, Ian (June 1, 2015). "McKinley Won't Run for Governor". The Intelligencer & Wheeling News Register. Retrieved June 1, 2015.
  3. ^ "Ex-WV Delegate Manypenny files early papers for Congress". Associated Press. WOWK-TV. April 28, 2015. Retrieved April 29, 2015.
  4. ^ a b c d e f "Official 2016 Primary Election Results". West Virginia Secretary of State. Retrieved May 25, 2016.
  5. ^ a b c "West Virginia Statewide Results General Election – November 8, 2016 Official Results". West Virginia Secretary of State. November 8, 2016. Archived from the original on December 25, 2016. Retrieved December 3, 2016.
  6. ^ Emke, Dave (March 7, 2016). "Savitt posing challenge to Mooney in W.Va.'s 2nd District". The Journal. Archived from the original on March 9, 2016. Retrieved March 8, 2016.
  7. ^ "Former W.Va. delegate to run for congressional seat". The Herald-Mail. January 11, 2016. Retrieved January 12, 2016.

External links[edit]