2016 United States presidential election in Maryland

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2016 United States presidential election in Maryland

← 2012 November 8, 2016 2020 →
Turnout71.98%[citation needed] Decrease
  Hillary Clinton by Gage Skidmore 2.jpg Donald Trump official portrait (cropped).jpg
Nominee Hillary Clinton Donald Trump
Party Democratic Republican
Home state New York New York
Running mate Tim Kaine Mike Pence
Electoral vote 10 0
Popular vote 1,677,928 943,169
Percentage 60.33% 33.91%

Maryland Presidential Election Results 2016.svg
County results
Clinton:      40–50%      50–60%      60–70%      70–80%      80–90%
Trump:      40–50%      50–60%      60–70%      70–80%

President before election

Barack Obama
Democratic

Elected President

Donald Trump
Republican

Treemap of the popular vote by county.

The 2016 United States presidential election in Maryland was held on November 8, 2016, as part of the 2016 General Election in which all 50 states plus The District of Columbia participated. Maryland voters chose electors to represent them in the Electoral College via a popular vote pitting the Republican Party's nominee, businessman Donald Trump, and running mate Indiana Governor Mike Pence against Democratic Party nominee, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and her running mate, Virginia Senator Tim Kaine.

On April 26, 2016,[1] in the presidential primaries, Maryland voters expressed their preferences for the Democratic, and Republican parties' respective nominees for president. Registered members of each party only voted in their party's primary, while voters who were unaffiliated only voted in nonpartisan primary elections (e.g. School Board).[2]

Hillary Clinton won Maryland with 60.3% of the vote. Donald Trump received 33.9% of the vote.[3] Maryland was among the eleven states in which Clinton improved on Barack Obama's 2012 performance, although she only improved by about 300 votes.[4] Maryland was one of four states in which Clinton received over 60% of the vote, the others being Massachusetts, Hawaii and California. Clinton continued the tradition of Democratic dominance in the state of Maryland, capturing large majorities of the vote in the densely populated and heavily nonwhite Democratic Baltimore–Washington metropolitan area, while Trump easily outperformed her in more white, sparsely-populated regions elsewhere in the state that tend to vote Republican. While Republicans typically win more counties, they are usually swamped by the heavily Democratic counties between Baltimore and Washington. The state's four largest county-level jurisdictions—Montgomery, Prince George's and Baltimore counties and the City of Baltimore—all broke for Clinton by double digits, enough to deliver the state to her.

Clinton became the first Democrat to win Anne Arundel County, home to the state capital of Annapolis, since Lyndon B. Johnson in 1964.

Background[edit]

The incumbent President of the United States, Barack Obama, a Democrat and former U.S. Senator from Illinois, was first elected president in the 2008 election, running with former Senator Joe Biden of Delaware. Defeating the Republican nominee, Senator John McCain of Arizona, with 52.9% of the popular vote and 68% of the electoral vote,[5][6] Obama succeeded two-term Republican President George W. Bush, the former Governor of Texas. Obama and Biden were reelected in the 2012 presidential election, defeating former Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney with 51.1% of the popular vote and 61.7% of electoral votes.[7] Although Barack Obama's approval rating in the RealClearPolitics poll tracking average remained between 40 and 50 percent for most of his second term, it has experienced a surge in early 2016 and reached its highest point since 2012 during June of that year.[8][9] Analyst Nate Cohn has noted that a strong approval rating for Barack Obama would equate to a strong performance for the Democratic candidate, and vice versa.[10]

Following his second term, President Barack Obama was not eligible for another reelection. In October 2015, Obama's running-mate and two-term Vice President Joe Biden decided not to enter the race for the Democratic presidential nomination either.[11] With their terms expiring on January 20, 2017, the electorate was asked to elect a new president, the 45th president and 48th vice president of the United States, respectively.

General election[edit]

Results[edit]

United States presidential election in Maryland, 2016
Party Candidate Running mate Votes % Electoral votes
Democratic Hillary Clinton Tim Kaine 1,677,928 60.33% 10
Republican Donald Trump Mike Pence 943,169 33.91% 0
Libertarian Gary Johnson William Weld 79,605 2.86% 0
Green Jill Stein Ajamu Baraka 35,945 1.29% 0
Others Write ins 44,799 1.61% 0
Total 2,781,446 100.00% 10

By county[edit]

County Trump% Trump# Clinton% Clinton# Others% Other# Totals#
Allegany 69.39% 21,270 25.69% 7,875 4.92% 1,509 30,654
Anne Arundel 45.32% 122,403 47.55% 128,419 7.13% 19,259 270,081
Baltimore (City) 10.53% 25,205 84.66% 202,673 4.81% 11,524 239,402
Baltimore (County) 38.26% 149,477 55.91% 218,412 5.83% 22,793 390,682
Calvert 55.21% 26,176 38.44% 18,225 6.34% 3,007 47,408
Caroline 66.38% 9,368 28.41% 4,009 5.22% 736 14,113
Carroll 63.38% 58,215 28.92% 26,567 7.69% 7,066 91,848
Cecil 63.77% 28,868 30.15% 13,650 6.08% 2,751 45,269
Charles 32.71% 25,614 63.01% 49,341 4.28% 3,348 78,303
Dorchester 55.26% 8,413 41.02% 6,245 3.72% 567 15,225
Frederick 47.36% 59,522 44.97% 56,522 7.66% 9,633 125,677
Garrett 76.91% 10,776 18.32% 2,567 4.77% 668 14,011
Harford 58.25% 77,860 35.22% 47,077 6.53% 8,735 133,672
Howard 29.28% 47,484 63.26% 102,597 7.47% 12,112 162,193
Kent 48.66% 4,876 45.65% 4,575 5.69% 570 10,021
Montgomery 19.36% 92,704 74.72% 357,837 5.92% 28,332 478,873
Prince George's 8.40% 32,811 88.13% 344,049 3.46% 13,525 390,385
Queen Anne's 64.07% 16,993 30.06% 7,973 5.87% 1,557 26,523
St. Mary's 57.51% 28,663 35.18% 17,534 7.31% 3,645 49,842
Somerset 53.95% 5,341 42.38% 4,196 3.67% 363 9,900
Talbot 52.18% 10,724 42.10% 8,653 5.72% 1,176 20,553
Washington 62.13% 40,998 32.02% 21,129 5.86% 3,864 65,991
Wicomico 52.17% 22,198 42.42% 18,050 5.40% 2,299 42,547
Worcester 60.87% 17,210 34.50% 9,753 4.63% 1,310 28,273

By congressional district[edit]

Clinton won 7 of the state's 8 congressional districts. [12]

District Trump Clinton Representative
1st 60% 35% Andy Harris
2nd 37% 58% Dutch Ruppersberger
3rd 32% 63% John Sarbanes
4th 20% 77% Donna Edwards
Anthony Brown
5th 31% 65% Steny Hoyer
6th 40% 55% John Delaney
7th 22% 74% Elijah Cummings
8th 31% 64% Chris Van Hollen
Jamie Raskin

Counties that swung from Democratic to Republican[edit]

Counties that swung from Republican to Democratic[edit]

Primary elections[edit]

Democratic primary[edit]

Election results by county.
  Hillary Clinton
  Bernie Sanders
Maryland Democratic primary, April 26, 2016
Candidate Popular vote Estimated delegates
Count Percentage Pledged Unpledged Total
Hillary Clinton 573,242 62.53% 60 17 77
Bernie Sanders 309,990 33.81% 35 1 36
Rocky De La Fuente 3,582 0.39% N/A
Uncommitted 29,949 3.27% 0 6 6
Total 916,763 100% 95 24 119
Source: The Green Papers, Maryland State Board of Elections - Official Primary Results,
MDP Announces DNC Delegates, Alternates and State DNC Members,
MDP Announces District-Level Delegate Winners

Republican primary[edit]

Election results by county.
  Donald Trump
Maryland Republican primary, April 26, 2016
Candidate Votes Percentage Actual delegate count
Bound Unbound Total
America Symbol.svg Donald Trump 248,343 54.10% 38 0 38
John Kasich 106,614 23.22% 0 0 0
Ted Cruz 87,093 18.97% 0 0 0
Ben Carson (withdrawn) 5,946 1.30% 0 0 0
Marco Rubio (withdrawn) 3,201 0.70% 0 0 0
Jeb Bush (withdrawn) 2,770 0.60% 0 0 0
Rand Paul (withdrawn) 1,533 0.33% 0 0 0
Chris Christie (withdrawn) 1,239 0.27% 0 0 0
Carly Fiorina (withdrawn) 1,012 0.22% 0 0 0
Mike Huckabee (withdrawn) 837 0.18% 0 0 0
Rick Santorum (withdrawn) 478 0.10% 0 0 0
Unprojected delegates: 0 0 0
Total: 459,066 100.00% 38 0 38
Source: The Green Papers

Minor parties[edit]

Green primary[edit]

The Green Party of Maryland began mailing ballots to those who requested them in May. The final vote and tabulation of the ballots took place at the state convention on June 12.[13] Seven candidates appeared on the ballot: Jill Stein, Kent Mesplay, Darryl Cherney, Sedinam Curry, William Kreml, Elijah Manley, and Raymond Haigood.[14]

Green Party of Maryland Primary
Candidate Votes Percentage National delegates
Jill Stein 51 100% 6
William Kreml - - -
Sedinam Kinamo Christin Moyowasifza Curry - - -
Kent Mesplay - - -
Darryl Cherney - - -
Elijah Manley - - -
Raymond Haigood - - -
Total 51 100% 6

Libertarian convention[edit]

Libertarian National Convention, Maryland Delegate Vote (Round One)[15]
Candidate Delegate Votes Percentage
Gary Johnson 10 56%
Marc Allan Feldman 4 22%
Darryl W. Perry 2 11%
Austin Petersen 2 11%
Others - -
Total 18 100%
Libertarian National Convention, Maryland Delegate Vote (Round Two)[15]
Candidate Delegate Votes Percentage
Gary Johnson 10 67%
Marc Allan Feldman 2 13%
Darryl W. Perry 2 13%
John McAfee 1 7%
Others - -
Total 15 100%

Polling[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Board of Elections 2016 Presidential Election and Early Voting". 3.montgomerycountymd.gov. Retrieved 2016-11-13.
  2. ^ Maryland State Board of Elections (2016-04-05). "Change of Address". Elections.state.md.us. Retrieved 2016-11-13.
  3. ^ "Maryland Election Results 2016". The New York Times. 2016-11-08. Retrieved 2016-11-13.
  4. ^ http://uselectionatlas.org/RESULTS/data.php?year=2016&def=swg&datatype=national&f=0&off=0&elect=0
  5. ^ "United States House of Representatives floor summary for Jan 8, 2009". Clerk.house.gov. Archived from the original on April 2, 2012. Retrieved January 30, 2009.
  6. ^ "Federal elections 2008" (PDF). Federal Election Commission. Retrieved May 11, 2015.
  7. ^ "President Map". The New York Times. November 29, 2012. Retrieved May 11, 2015.
  8. ^ "Election Other – President Obama Job Approval". RealClearPolitics. Retrieved December 24, 2015.
  9. ^ Byrnes, Jesse (2016-06-15). "Poll: Obama approval rating highest since 2012". TheHill. Retrieved 2016-06-19.
  10. ^ Cohn, Nate (2015-01-19). "What a Rise in Obama's Approval Rating Means for 2016". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2016-06-19.
  11. ^ "Joe Biden Decides Not to Enter Presidential Race". The Wall Street Journal. Retrieved October 21, 2015.
  12. ^ https://www.cookpolitical.com/introducing-2017-cook-political-report-partisan-voter-index
  13. ^ "Green Party Presidential Primary". Maryland Green Party. February 14, 2016. Retrieved March 12, 2016.
  14. ^ "Green Party Presidential Primary". Maryland Green Party. Retrieved June 1, 2016.
  15. ^ a b Libertarian Party National Convention (Live Video). Orlando, Florida: C-SPAN. May 29, 2016. Retrieved May 29, 2016.

External links[edit]