2016 Vermont Democratic primary

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Vermont Democratic primary, 2016

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  Bernie Sanders September 2015 cropped.jpg Hillary Clinton by Gage Skidmore 2.jpg
Candidate Bernie Sanders Hillary Clinton
Home state Vermont New York
Delegate count 16 0
Popular vote 115,900 18,338
Percentage 85.69% 13.56%

Vermont Democratic Presidential Primary Election Results by County, 2016.svg
Election results by county.
  Bernie Sanders

The 2016 Vermont Democratic primary took place on March 1 in the U.S. state of Vermont as one of the Democratic Party's primaries ahead of the 2016 presidential election.

On the same day, dubbed "Super Tuesday," Democratic primaries were held in ten other states plus American Samoa, while the Republican Party held primaries in eleven states including their own Vermont primary.

Opinion polling[edit]

Poll source Date 1st 2nd Other
Official Primary results March 1, 2016 Bernie Sanders
85.7%
Hillary Clinton
13.6%
Others / Uncommitted
0.8%
The Castleton Polling Institute [1]

Margin of error: ± 3.27
Sample size: 895

February 3–17, 2016 Bernie Sanders
83.1%
Hillary Clinton
9.0%
Others / Undecided 7.9%
Public Policy Polling[2]

Margin of error: ± 3.7
Sample size: 500

February 14–16, 2016 Bernie Sanders
86%
Hillary Clinton
10%
Castleton University[3]

Margin of error: ± 4%
Sample size: 617

August 24 – September 14, 2015 Bernie Sanders
65%
Hillary Clinton
14%
Others 10%, Not sure 11%
Castleton University[4]

Margin of error: ± 3.8%
Sample size: 653

October 10, 2014 Bernie Sanders
36%
Hillary Clinton
29%
Neither 29%, Not sure 5%, Refused 1%

Results[edit]

Sanders presidential campaign kickoff in his home state of Vermont, May 2015. Sanders would go on to win the Green Mountain state with over 80% of the vote.
Vermont participates in the roll call vote at the 2016 Democratic National Convention

Primary date: March 1, 2016
National delegates: 26

Vermont Democratic primary, March 1, 2016
Candidate Popular vote Estimated delegates
Count Percentage Pledged Unpledged Total
Bernie Sanders 115,900 85.69% 16 6 22
Hillary Clinton 18,338 13.56% 0 4 4
Martin O'Malley (withdrawn) 282 0.21%
Roque "Rocky" De La Fuente 80 0.06%
Total blank votes 260 0.19%
Total write-ins 238 0.18%
Total spoiled votes 158 0.12%
Uncommitted N/A 0 0 0
Total 135,256 100% 16 10 26
Source: The Green Papers, Vermont Secretary of State

Results by county[edit]

County Clinton % Sanders % Others Totals Turnout Margin
Addison 1,111 12.5% 7,732 87.0%
Bennington 1,255 17.9% 5,651 80.5%
Caldonia 527 10.2% 4,598 89.0%
Chittenden 5,687 14.9% 32,244 84.5%
Essex 141 13.5% 890 85.1%
Franklin 778 10.2% 6,746 88.8%
Grand Isle 233 13.1% 1,529 85.6%
Lamoille 574 11.3% 4,471 88.0%
Orange 646 10.7% 5,402 88.8%
Orleans 472 11.7% 3,540 87.6%
Rutland 1,584 14.3% 9,354 84.6%
Washington 1,717 12.2% 12,313 87.1%
Windham 1,416 12.2% 10,085 87.2%
Windsor 2,197 16.1% 11,345 83.3%
Total 18,338 13.6% 115,900 85.7%

Analysis[edit]

Bernie Sanders won his largest victory of the entire 2016 primary season in his home state of Vermont, routing Hillary Clinton by a 72-point margin and therefore blocking her from collecting any pledged delegates from the state. He carried every county in the state. Sanders won all major demographics -- age, gender, income and educational attainment levels. The electorate in Vermont was 95% white, with voters backing Sanders 86-13.[5]

After voting in the primary, Sanders said of his chances in other Super Tuesday contests: "I am confident that if there is a large voter turnout today across this country, we will do well [...] If not we're going to be struggling."[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Subject: The VPR Poll: The Races, The Issues And The Full Results".
  2. ^ "Subject: Clinton leads in 10 of 12 Early March Primaries; Benefits From Overwhelming Black Support" (PDF).
  3. ^ "Poll: Bernie Sanders popular in Vt., even among Republicans · Castleton College". Wcax.com. Retrieved 2015-09-18.
  4. ^ "Vermont Election Poll – 2014". Castleton.edu. Retrieved 2015-07-10.
  5. ^ "2016 Election Center". CNN. 2016-03-01. Retrieved 2016-09-25.
  6. ^ Martin, Jacquelyn (2016-03-01). "Bernie Sanders Wins Vermont". U.S. News & World Report. Retrieved 2016-09-25.