2018 U.S. Open (golf)

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2018 U.S. Open
2018USOpenLogo.svg
Tournament information
Dates June 14–17, 2018
Location Shinnecock Hills, New York
Course(s) Shinnecock Hills Golf Club
Organized by USGA
Tour(s) PGA Tour
European Tour
Japan Golf Tour
Statistics
Par 70
Length 7,440 yards (6,800 m)
Field 156 players, 67 after cut
Cut 148 (+8)
Prize fund $12,000,000
10,244,150
Winner's share $2,160,000
€1,843,947
Champion
United States Brooks Koepka
281 (+1)
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Shinnecock Hills  is located in the US
Shinnecock Hills 
Shinnecock 
Hills 
Location in the United States
Shinnecock Hills  is located in New York
Shinnecock Hills 
Shinnecock 
Hills 
Location in New York

The 2018 United States Open Championship was the 118th U.S. Open, held June 14–17 at Shinnecock Hills Golf Club in Shinnecock Hills, New York, about eighty miles (130 km) east of New York City on Long Island; it was the fifth time the U.S. Open was held at this course.

Defending champion Brooks Koepka shot a final round 68 for 281 (+1) to win his second straight U.S. Open, one stroke ahead of runner-up Tommy Fleetwood, who closed with the sixth round of 63 in U.S. Open history. Koepka was only the third to successfully defend the title since World War II, following Ben Hogan (1951) and Curtis Strange (1989).

The USGA changed the playoff format in February, from a full round (18 holes) to a two-hole aggregate playoff.[1] Previously, playoffs at the U.S. Open were 18 holes, followed by sudden-death, if needed. The last 18-hole playoff was in 2008, won by Tiger Woods on the first sudden-death hole.

Media[edit]

This was the fourth U.S. Open televised by Fox and FS1.

Venue[edit]

Course layout[edit]

Hole Name Yards Par    Hole Name Yards Par
1 Westward Ho 399 4 10 Eastward Ho 415 4
2 Plateau 252 3 11 Hill Head 159 3
3 Peconic 500 4 12 Tuckahoe 469 4
4 Pump House 475 4 13 Road Side 374 4
5 Montauk 589 5 14 Thom's Elbow 519 4
6 Pond 491 4 15 Sebonac 409 4
7 Redan 189 3 16 Shinnecock 616 5
8 Lowlands 439 4 17 Eden 175 3
9 Ben Nevis 485 4 18 Home 485 4
Out 3,819 35 In 3,621 35
Source: Total 7,440 70

Lengths of the course for previous major championships:

2018 yardages by round
Round Hole 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Out 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 In Total
Par 4 3 4 4 5 4 3 4 4 35 4 3 4 4 4 4 5 3 4 35 70
1 Yards 407 252 510 478 592 452 184 439 487 3,801 418 157 462 374 536 404 620 185 491 3,647 7,448
2 Yards 411 234 499 476 583 492 184 448 482 3,809 404 153 476 360 511 420 610 169 490 3,593 7,402
3 Yards 409 239 495 481 591 486 166 448 486 3,801 416 159 465 366 529 416 627 150 485 3,613 7,414
4 Yards 399 264 495 471 597 494 180 435 478 3,813 411 159 472 367 512 408 621 182 486 3,618 7,431
  • Scoring average: 74.650
    • by round: 76.474, 73.595, 75.327, 72.180
  • Most difficult holes in relation to par: 14, 3, 2, 10

Source:[2]

Field[edit]

The first tee and clubhouse
at Shinnecock Hills

About half the field consisted of players who were exempt from qualifying for the U.S. Open. Each player is classified according to the first category in which he qualified, and other categories are shown in parentheses.[3]

1. Winners of the U.S. Open Championship during the last ten years

Lucas Glover, Dustin Johnson (12,13,14), Martin Kaymer, Brooks Koepka (11,12,13,14), Graeme McDowell, Rory McIlroy (6,7,13,14), Justin Rose (12,13,14), Webb Simpson (8,12,13,14), Jordan Spieth (5,6,12,13,14), Tiger Woods

2. Winner and runner-up of the 2017 U.S. Amateur, winner of the 2017 U.S. Junior Amateur and 2017 U.S. Mid-Amateur

Doug Ghim (a), Noah Goodwin (a), Matt Parziale (a)

  • Doc Redman forfeited his exemption as winner of the U.S. Amateur by turning professional in May 2018.[4]
3. Winner of the 2017 Amateur Championship

Harry Ellis (a)

4. Winner of the 2017 Mark H. McCormack Medal (men's World Amateur Golf Ranking)
5. Winners of the Masters Tournament during the last five years

Sergio García (12,13,14), Patrick Reed (12,13,14), Bubba Watson (13,14), Danny Willett

6. Winners of The Open Championship during the last five years

Zach Johnson (13,14), Phil Mickelson (13,14), Henrik Stenson (13,14)

7. Winners of the PGA Championship during the last five years

Jason Day (8,12,13,14), Jason Dufner (12,13,14), Justin Thomas (11,12,13,14), Jimmy Walker (13,14)

8. Winners of The Players Championship during the last three years

Kim Si-woo (13,14)

9. Winner of the 2018 European Tour BMW PGA Championship

Francesco Molinari (13,14)

10. Winner of the 2017 U.S. Senior Open Championship

Kenny Perry

11. The 10 lowest scorers and anyone tying for 10th place at the 2017 U.S. Open Championship

Tommy Fleetwood (13,14), Rickie Fowler (12,13,14), Bill Haas, Brian Harman (12,13,14), Charley Hoffman (12,13,14), Hideki Matsuyama (12,13,14), Trey Mullinax, Xander Schauffele (12,13,14), Brandt Snedeker

12. Players who qualified for the season-ending 2017 Tour Championship

Daniel Berger (13,14), Patrick Cantlay (13,14), Paul Casey (13,14), Kevin Chappell (13,14), Tony Finau (13,14), Adam Hadwin (13,14), Russell Henley (13,14), Kevin Kisner (13,14), Matt Kuchar (13,14), Marc Leishman (13,14), Pat Perez (13,14), Jon Rahm (13,14), Kyle Stanley (13,14), Jhonattan Vegas, Gary Woodland (13,14)

13. The top 60 point leaders and ties as of May 21, 2018, in the Official World Golf Ranking

Kiradech Aphibarnrat (14), Rafael Cabrera-Bello (14), Bryson DeChambeau (14), Ross Fisher (14), Matthew Fitzpatrick (14), Dylan Frittelli, Branden Grace (14), Chesson Hadley, Tyrrell Hatton (14), Charles Howell III (14), Satoshi Kodaira (14), Alexander Lévy (14), Li Haotong (14), Luke List (14), Alex Norén (14), Louis Oosthuizen (14), Ian Poulter (14), Chez Reavie (14), Charl Schwartzel (14), Cameron Smith (14), Brendan Steele (14), Peter Uihlein (14)

14. The top 60 point leaders and ties as of June 11, 2018, in the Official World Golf Ranking

An Byeong-hun, Emiliano Grillo

15. Special exemptions given by the USGA

Ernie Els, Jim Furyk[5]

The remaining contestants earned their places through sectional qualifiers.

Alternates who gained entry:

(a) denotes amateur
(L) denotes player advanced through local qualifying

Nationalities in the field[edit]

North America (88) South America (3) Europe (35) Oceania (11) Asia (13) Africa (6)
 Canada (3)  Argentina (1)  England (17)  Australia (9)  China (2)  South Africa (6)
 Costa Rica (1)^  Colombia (1)  Northern Ireland (2)  New Zealand (2)  India (1)
 Mexico (1)  Venezuela (1)  Scotland (4)  Japan (4)
 United States (83)  Ireland (1)  South Korea (4)
 Denmark (1)  Taiwan (1)
 France (2)  Thailand (1)
 Germany (1)
 Italy (1)
 Norway (1)
 Spain (3)
 Sweden (2)

^ Amateur Luis Gagne is a dual-citizen of Costa Rica and the United States.[6] The U.S. Open lists him as representing Costa Rica[7] (as in this table) while the World Amateur Golf Ranking lists him as representing the United States.[8]

Past champions in the field[edit]

Made the cut[edit]

Player Country Year won R1 R2 R3 R4 Total To par Finish
Brooks Koepka  United States 2017 75 66 72 68 281 +1 1
Dustin Johnson  United States 2016 69 67 77 70 283 +3 3
Justin Rose  England 2013 71 70 73 73 287 +7 T10
Webb Simpson  United States 2012 76 71 71 69 287 +7 T10
Jim Furyk  United States 2003 73 71 72 80 296 +16 T48

Source:[9]

Missed the cut[edit]

Player Country Year(s) won R1 R2 Total To par
Jordan Spieth  United States 2015 78 71 149 +9
Graeme McDowell  Northern Ireland 2010 79 70 149 +9
Lucas Glover  United States 2009 77 72 149 +9
Rory McIlroy  Northern Ireland 2011 80 70 150 +10
Tiger Woods  United States 2000, 2002, 2008 78 72 150 +10
Ernie Els  South Africa 1994, 1997 78 79 157 +17
Martin Kaymer  Germany 2014 83 75 158 +18

Source:[9]

Round summaries[edit]

First round[edit]

Thursday, June 14, 2018

Conditions were extremely difficult as gusty winds hung around all day with sunny skies, making the course firm and fast.[10] Only four players broke par, including Dustin Johnson, one of the tournament favorites. The scoring average for the round was 76.47.[11][12]

Place Player Country Score To par
T1 Russell Henley  United States 69 −1
Dustin Johnson  United States
Scott Piercy  United States
Ian Poulter  England
5 Jason Dufner  United States 70 E
T6 An Byeong-hun  South Korea 71 +1
Sam Burns  United States
Charley Hoffman  United States
Charles Howell III  United States
Matthieu Pavon  France
Justin Rose  England
Henrik Stenson  Sweden

Source:[9]

Second round[edit]

Friday, June 15, 2018

Dustin Johnson held the lead after shooting a 67, four shots ahead of Charley Hoffman and Scott Piercy.[13]

Place Player Country Score To par
1 Dustin Johnson  United States 69-67=136 −4
T2 Charley Hoffman  United States 71-69=140 E
Scott Piercy  United States 69-71=140
T4 Tommy Fleetwood  England 75-66=141 +1
Henrik Stenson  Sweden 71-70=141
Justin Rose  England 71-70=141
Brooks Koepka  United States 75-66=141
Ian Poulter  England 69-72=141
T9 Rickie Fowler  United States 73-69=142 +2
Russell Henley  United States 69-73=142

Source:[9]

Amateurs: Grimmer (+5), Gagne (+7), Parziale (+7), Thornberry (+9), Strafaci (+10), Ghim (+13), Rasmussen (+14), Hagestad (+15), Bergeron (+16), Humphrey (+16), Yu (+17), Huang (+18), Lumsden (+18), Rank (+18), Reitan (+18), Wiseman (+18), Ban (+19), Ellis (+19), Goodwin (+19), Barbaree (+21)

Third round[edit]

Saturday, June 16, 2018

Second round leader Dustin Johnson shot a seven-over 77 to fall into a four-way tie with Daniel Berger, Tony Finau and defending champion Brooks Koepka. Johnson double bogeyed the par-3 2nd and went six-over on the front-nine. He made his only birdie of the round at the 11th to get back to the top of the leaderboard, but three-putted for bogey on 18 to settle for a share of the 54-hole lead. Berger and Finau began the round in 45th place and 11 shots behind, but each shot 66 (−4) for the low round of the day.[14][15][16][17]

Scoring conditions got more difficult as the day went on. Koepka's two-over 72 was the lowest score among the final four groups. Only three rounds in the 60s were recorded, two of them by Berger and Finau. The scoring average for the round was 75.3.[18]

Phil Mickelson incurred a two-shot penalty on the 13th when he walked after his ball which was running slowly away from the hole after his putt and deliberately hit the ball backwards towards the hole while it was still moving. He ended up shooting 81 (+11), equalling his highest score at the U.S. Open.[19][20][21]

Place Player Country Score To par
T1 Daniel Berger  United States 76-71-66=213 +3
Tony Finau  United States 75-72-66=213
Dustin Johnson  United States 69-67-77=213
Brooks Koepka  United States 75-66-72=213
5 Justin Rose  England 71-70-73=214 +4
6 Henrik Stenson  Sweden 71-70-74=215 +5
T7 Kiradech Aphibarnrat  Thailand 76-72-68=216 +6
Jim Furyk  United States 73-71-72=216
Patrick Reed  United States 73-72-71=216
T10 Brian Gay  United States 73-74-70=217 +7
Branden Grace  South Africa 76-69-72=217
Tyrrell Hatton  England 75-70-72=217
Charley Hoffman  United States 71-69-77=217
Dylan Meyer  United States 77-69-71=217
Ian Poulter  England 69-72-76=217

Source:[9]

Amateurs: Parziale (+11), Gagne (+12), Grimmer (+13)

Final round[edit]

Sunday, June 17, 2018

Brooks Koepka shot a final round 68 (−2) to finish one ahead of Tommy Fleetwood and win the U.S. Open for the second straight year. He was the first to successfully defend the title in 29 years, since Curtis Strange in 1989.

Koepka began the round in a four-way tie for the lead with Dustin Johnson, Daniel Berger, and Tony Finau. He got off to a good start with birdies on three of his first five holes to get to even par and take the lead. At the par-3 11th, his tee shot went into the rough over the green. After chipping into a greenside bunker, he holed a 12-foot (3.7 m) putt to save bogey. At the following hole, he made a six-foot par putt, then at the 14th he got up-and-down to save par from short of the green with an eight-foot putt. Hitting his approach at the par-5 16th to within four feet, he made the birdie to open up a two-shot lead. Despite a bogey at the 18th, Koepka held on win by one.[22]

Fleetwood shot the sixth round of 63 in U.S. Open history to finish in second. He began the round six behind and began by sinking a putt from 56-foot (17 m) at the 2nd and three more birdies on the front-nine. He made four straight birdies on holes 12–15, with putts of 17 feet (5 m) at 12, a 20 feet (6 m) at 14, and 29 feet (9 m) at 15. Fleetwood had an eight-foot putt at the 18th for the first 62 in U.S. Open history, but it slid past the hole that would have forced the first two-hole playoff.[23]

Johnson made birdie at the 5th but three-putted for bogey at the 7th, 11th, 14th, and 17th. He birdied the last to shoot an even-par 70 and finish two shots behind Koepka. Finau bogeyed three of his first four holes but got back to even for the round with a 26-foot birdie at the 11th. He came to the 18th two back of Koepka but made double bogey and ended up in fifth place, four behind. Berger also started his round with two bogeys and finished with a three-over 73 to tie for sixth. Patrick Reed began three shots behind but birdied his first three holes and five of the first seven to tie for the lead. He made four bogeys the rest of the round, however, to fall back to fourth place.[24][25]

With the win, Koepka becomes the seventh player to win consecutive U.S. Opens, and the first since Curtis Strange in 1989.

Place Player Country Score To par Money ($)
1 Brooks Koepka  United States 75-66-72-68=281 +1 2,160,000
2 Tommy Fleetwood  England 75-66-78-63=282 +2 1,296,000
3 Dustin Johnson  United States 69-67-77-70=283 +3 812,927
4 Patrick Reed  United States 73-72-71-68=284 +4 569,884
5 Tony Finau  United States 75-72-66-72=285 +5 474,659
T6 Daniel Berger  United States 76-71-66-73=286 +6 361,923
Tyrrell Hatton  England 75-70-72-69=286
Xander Schauffele  United States 72-74-72-68=286
Henrik Stenson  Sweden 71-70-74-71=286
T10 Justin Rose  England 71-70-73-73=287 +7 270,151
Webb Simpson  United States 76-71-71-69=287

Source:[9]

Amateurs: Gagne (+16), Parziale (+16), Grimmer (+23)

Scorecard[edit]

Final round

Hole 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
Par 4 3 4 4 5 4 3 4 4 4 3 4 4 4 4 5 3 4
United States Koepka +3 +2 +1 +1 E +1 +1 +1 +1 E +1 +1 +1 +1 +1 E E +1
England Fleetwood +9 +8 +7 +7 +7 +6 +5 +5 +6 +6 +6 +5 +4 +3 +2 +2 +2 +2
United States Johnson +3 +3 +3 +3 +2 +2 +3 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3 +3 +4 +3 +3 +4 +3
United States Reed +5 +4 +3 +3 +2 +2 +1 +1 +2 +2 +3 +4 +4 +4 +3 +3 +3 +4
United States Finau +3 +4 +5 +6 +5 +5 +6 +5 +4 +4 +3 +4 +4 +3 +3 +3 +3 +5
United States Berger +3 +4 +5 +5 +4 +5 +5 +5 +5 +4 +4 +4 +4 +4 +5 +5 +6 +6

Cumulative tournament scores, relative to par

Birdie Bogey Double bogey

Source:[9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "U.S. Open abandons 18 holes for 2-hole playoff". ESPN. Associated Press. February 26, 2018. Retrieved June 5, 2018. 
  2. ^ "118th U.S. Open Championship – Course Statistics". USGA. 
  3. ^ "118th U.S. Open Championship – Entry Form" (PDF). USGA. Retrieved March 13, 2018. 
  4. ^ Herrington, Ryan (May 30, 2018). "U.S. Amateur champion Doc Redman and Western Amateur champ Norman Xiong announce plans to turn pro". Golf World. 
  5. ^ Herrington, Ryan (March 14, 2018). "USGA gives Ernie Els, Jim Furyk special exemptions into 2018 U.S. Open at Shinnecock Hills". Golf Digest. 
  6. ^ Shefter, David (August 16, 2016). "Life's a Beach for Alternate Gagne at Oakland Hills". USGA. 
  7. ^ "Luis Gagne". USGA. Retrieved June 13, 2018. 
  8. ^ "Luis Gagne". World Amateur Golf Ranking. Retrieved June 13, 2018. 
  9. ^ a b c d e f g "U.S. Open: Leaderboard". ESPN. June 15, 2018. 
  10. ^ Murray, Scott (June 14, 2018). "US Open 2018: first round: Dustin Johnson shares lead after brutal day – as it happened". The Guardian. Retrieved June 20, 2018. 
  11. ^ "Dustin Johnson tied for lead after 69". ESPN. June 14, 2018. 
  12. ^ "118th U.S. Open Championship – Course Statistics, Round 1". USGA. Retrieved June 15, 2018. 
  13. ^ Murray, Scott (June 15, 2018). "US Open 2018: second round – as it happened". The Guardian. Retrieved June 20, 2018. 
  14. ^ Herrington, Ryan (June 16, 2018). "U.S. Open 2018: Four players share the 54-hole lead after a crazy Saturday at Shinnecock Hills". Golf Digest. Retrieved June 16, 2018. 
  15. ^ Shedloski, Dave (June 16, 2018). "U.S. Open 2018: Dustin Johnson falls back to earth with 77, but still has great chance at title". Golf Digest. Retrieved June 16, 2018. 
  16. ^ Kilbridge, Dan (June 16, 2018). "Daniel Berger tames Shinnecock to get in the mix in Round 3 of U.S. Open". Golfweek. Retrieved June 16, 2018. 
  17. ^ Murray, Scott (June 16, 2018). "US Open 2018: third round – as it happened". The Guardian. Retrieved June 20, 2018. 
  18. ^ Weinman, Sam (June 16, 2018). "U.S. Open 2018: A stark contrast between morning and afternoon conditions leaves certain players fuming". Golf Digest. Retrieved June 16, 2018. 
  19. ^ Lavner, Ryan (June 16, 2018). "Phil takes 2-shot penalty for hitting moving ball". Golf Channel. Retrieved June 16, 2018. 
  20. ^ "US Open: Phil Mickelson apologises for putting moving ball". BBC Sport. June 20, 2018. Retrieved June 21, 2018. 
  21. ^ "Phil Mickelson says he's sorry for hitting moving ball during US Open". The Guardian. Press Association. June 20, 2018. Retrieved June 21, 2018. 
  22. ^ Ritter, Jeff (June 17, 2018). "Back to back! Brooks Koepka outlasts Tommy Fleetwood to win 118th U.S. Open at Shinnecock Hills". Golf.com. Retrieved June 17, 2018. 
  23. ^ Hoggard, Rex (June 17, 2018). "Fleetwood fires 63, but comes up short at U.S. Open". Golf Channel. Retrieved June 17, 2018. 
  24. ^ Herrington, Ryan (June 17, 2018). "U.S. Open 2018: Brooks Koepka wins U.S. Open, repeats as champion after shooting closing 68 at Shinnecock Hills". Golf Digest. Retrieved June 17, 2018. 
  25. ^ Murray, Ewan (June 18, 2018). "Brooks Koepka makes history in holding off Fleetwood to retain US Open title". The Guardian. Retrieved June 18, 2018. 

External links[edit]

Preceded by
2018 Masters
Major Championships Succeeded by
2018 Open Championship

Coordinates: 40°53′38″N 72°26′24″W / 40.894°N 72.440°W / 40.894; -72.440