2018 United States House of Representatives elections in Connecticut

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2018 United States House of Representatives elections in Connecticut

← 2016 November 6, 2018 (2018-11-06) 2020 →

All 5 Connecticut seats to the United States House of Representatives
  Majority party Minority party
 
Party Democratic Republican
Last election 5 0
Seats won 5 0
Seat change Steady Steady
Popular vote 849,341 520,521
Percentage 61.64% 37.78%
Swing Decrease0.84% Increase1.71%

The 2018 United States House of Representatives elections in Connecticut were held on Tuesday, November 6, 2018, to elect the five U.S. Representatives from the state of Connecticut, one from each of the state's five congressional districts. The elections coincided with the gubernatorial election, as well as other elections to the House of Representatives, elections to the United States Senate and various state and local elections.

District 1[edit]

The 1st district is located in the north-central part of the state, and is anchored by the state capital of Hartford. It includes parts of Hartford, Litchfield, and Middlesex counties. The incumbent is Democrat John Larson, who has represented the district since 1999. He was re-elected to a tenth term with 64% of the vote in 2016.

Democratic primary[edit]

Republican primary[edit]

  • Jennifer Nye

General election[edit]

Results[edit]

Connecticut's 1st congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic John Larson (incumbent) 175,087 63.9
Republican Jennifer Nye 96,024 35.0
Green Tom McCormick 3,029 1.1
Total votes 272,210 100.0
Democratic hold

District 2[edit]

The 2nd district is located in the eastern part of the state, and includes all of New London, Tolland, and Windham counties and parts of Hartford, Middlesex, and New Haven counties. The incumbent is Democrat Joe Courtney, who has represented the district since 2007. He was re-elected to a sixth term with 63% of the vote in 2016. The National Republican Congressional Committee has outlined this district as one of the 36 Democratic-held districts it is targeting in 2018.[2]

Democratic primary[edit]

Republican primary[edit]

  • Dan Postemski, veteran and chairman of the Hampton Republican Town Committee[4]

General election[edit]

Endorsements[edit]

Dan Reale (L)
Individuals
  • Michael P. Meadows, former Republican candidate for Connecticut House of Representatives district 47, Republican State Central Committee Representative district 19, Sprague Republican Town Committee Chairman, Sprague Board of Finance Member[5]

Results[edit]

Connecticut's 2nd congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Joe Courtney (incumbent) 179,731 62.2
Republican Dan Postemski 102,483 35.5
Green Michelle Louise Bicking 3,595 1.2
Libertarian Dan Reale 3,305 1.1
Total votes 289,114 100.0
Democratic hold

District 3[edit]

The 3rd district is located in the central part of the state and contains the city of New Haven and its surrounding suburbs. It includes parts of Fairfield, Middlesex, and New Haven counties. The incumbent is Democrat Rosa DeLauro, who has represented the district since 1991. She was re-elected to a fourteenth term with 69% of the vote in 2016.

Democratic primary[edit]

Republican primary[edit]

  • Angel Cadena, Marine veteran and Republican nominee for CT-3 in 2016[7]

General election[edit]

Results[edit]

Connecticut's 3rd congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Rosa DeLauro (incumbent) 174,572 64.6
Republican Angel Cadena 95,667 35.4
Total votes 270,239 100.0
Democratic hold

District 4[edit]

The 4th district is located in the southwestern part of the state, extending from Bridgeport, the largest city in the state, to Greenwich. It includes parts of Fairfield and New Haven counties. The incumbent is Democrat Jim Himes, who has represented the district since 2009. He was re-elected to a fifth term with 60% of the vote in 2016.

Democratic primary[edit]

Republican primary[edit]

  • Harry Arora, investment firm founder[9]

General election[edit]

Results[edit]

Connecticut's 4th congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jim Himes (incumbent) 168,726 61.2
Republican Harry Arora 106,921 38.8
Independent Yusheng Peng (write-in) 4 0.0
Total votes 275,651 100.0
Democratic hold

District 5[edit]

The 5th district is located in the northwestern part of the state and includes parts of Fairfield, Hartford, Litchfield, and New Haven counties. The incumbent was Democrat Elizabeth Esty, who represented the district since 2013. She was re-elected to a third term with 58% of the vote in 2016. Esty did not run for reelection in 2018.[10]

Democratic primary[edit]

Declared

Declined

Primary results[edit]

Democratic primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jahana Hayes 24,339 62.2
Democratic Mary Glassman 14,776 37.8
Total votes 39,115 100.0

Republican primary[edit]

Declared

  • Rich DuPont, businessman[15]
  • Ruby Corby O’Neill, retired psychology professor and political activist[16]
  • Manny Santos, former mayor of Meriden[17]

Primary results[edit]

Republican primary results
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Manny Santos 16,228 51.7
Republican Ruby Corby O’Neill 8,359 26.6
Republican Rich DuPont 6,816 21.7
Total votes 31,403 100.0

General election[edit]

Results[edit]

Connecticut's 5th congressional district, 2018
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Jahana Hayes 151,225 55.9
Republican Manny Santos 119,426 44.1
Independent John Pistone (write-in) 13 0.0
Total votes 270,664 100.0
Democratic hold

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://docquery.fec.gov/pdf/167/201704309053487167/201704309053487167.pdf
  2. ^ https://www.nrcc.org/2017/02/08/nrcc-announces-initial-offensive-targets-2018-cycle/
  3. ^ http://docquery.fec.gov/pdf/628/201701099041203628/201701099041203628.pdf
  4. ^ Radelat, Ana (2018-04-02). "Courtney draws 'Quiet Corner' challenger". The Connecticut Mirror. Retrieved July 23, 2018.
  5. ^ https://twitter.com/Meadows47th/status/1059203108700594176
  6. ^ http://docquery.fec.gov/pdf/841/201612219040804841/201612219040804841.pdf
  7. ^ http://docquery.fec.gov/pdf/512/201801230300186512/201801230300186512.pdf
  8. ^ http://docquery.fec.gov/pdf/799/201612289040903799/201612289040903799.pdf
  9. ^ Borsuk, Ken (January 2, 2018). "Greenwich investment firm head to challenge Himes in 2018". Greenwich Time. Retrieved January 3, 2018.
  10. ^ Connolly, Griffin (April 3, 2018). "Rep. Elizabeth Esty Won't Seek Re-election in Wake of Abusive Staffer Disclosures". Roll Call. Washington, DC. Retrieved April 3, 2018.
  11. ^ "Mary Glassman jumps into suddenly open 5th District race - The CT MirrorThe CT Mirror". ctmirror.org. Retrieved 2018-04-03.
  12. ^ https://ctmirror.org/2018/05/17/jahana-hayes-art-linares-run-primaries
  13. ^ Viebeck, Elise (2018-04-02). "Elizabeth Esty won't seek reelection amid scrutiny of chief of staff's departure". Washington Post. ISSN 0190-8286. Retrieved 2018-04-03.
  14. ^ "Race for 5th CD Opens Up | CT News Junkie". CT News Junkie. Retrieved 2018-04-03.
  15. ^ "Closing Argument: Rich DuPont, Candidate for U.S. House". Reclaim Connecticut. May 10, 2018. Retrieved July 23, 2018.
  16. ^ Altimari, Daniela (April 26, 2018). "Another Republican Jumps Into 5th District Race". Hartford Courant. Retrieved July 23, 2018.
  17. ^ Godin, Mary (February 21, 2018). "Former Meriden Mayor Manny Santos to Run for U.S. Congress". Record-Journal. Retrieved July 12, 2018.

External links[edit]

Official campaign websites for first district candidates
Official campaign websites for second district candidates
Official campaign websites for third district candidates
Official campaign websites for fourth district candidates
Official campaign websites for fifth district candidates