2020 United States House of Representatives elections in Virginia

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2020 United States House of Representatives elections in Virginia

← 2018 November 3, 2020 2022 →

All 11 Virginia seats to the United States House of Representatives
 
Party Democratic Republican
Last election 7 4

The 2020 United States House of Representatives elections in Virginia will be held on November 3, 2020, to elect the 11 U.S. Representatives from the state of Virginia, one from each of the state's 11 congressional districts. The elections will coincide with the 2020 U.S. presidential election, as well as other elections to the House of Representatives, elections to the United States Senate and various state and local elections.

District 1[edit]

The 1st district is based in the western Chesapeake Bay, taking in the exurbs and suburbs of Washington, D.C. and Richmond, including Fredericksburg, Mechanicsville, and Montclair. The incumbent is Republican Rob Wittman, who was re-elected with 55.2% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

District 2[edit]

The 2nd district is based on the Eastern Shore of Virginia, containing the cities of Virginia Beach and Williamsburg and parts of Norfolk and Hampton. The incumbent is Democrat Elaine Luria, who flipped the district and was elected with 51.1% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Potential[edit]

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declined[edit]

District 3[edit]

The 3rd district encompasses the inner Hampton Roads, including parts of Hampton and Norfolk, as well as Newport News. The incumbent is Democrat Bobby Scott, who was reelected with 91.2% of the vote in 2018 without major-party opposition.[1]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

Republican Primary[edit]

Potential[edit]

  • John Collick, U.S. Marines veteran[6]

District 4[edit]

The 4th district takes in Richmond and parts of Southside Virginia, and stretches down into Chesapeake. The incumbent is Democrat Donald McEachin, who was re-elected with 62.6% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Potential[edit]

District 5[edit]

The 5th district encompasses south-central Virginia and contains the city of Charlottesville. The incumbent is Republican Denver Riggleman, who was elected with 53.2% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Potential[edit]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
Declined[edit]

District 6[edit]

The 6th district is located in west-central Virginia taking in the Shenandoah Valley, including Lynchburg and Roanoke. The incumbent is Republican Ben Cline, who was elected with 59.7% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Potential[edit]

District 7[edit]

The 7th district is based in central Virginia and encompasses suburban Richmond. The incumbent is Democrat Abigail Spanberger, who flipped the district and was elected with 50.3% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Potential[edit]

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]
Potential[edit]

Polling[edit]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin
of error
Nick
Freitas
Peter
Greenwald
John
McGuire
Tina
Ramirez
Bryce
Reeves
Undecided
WPA Intelligence (R)[A] May 13–15, 2019 400 ± 4.9% 23% 1% 9% 4% 11% 52%

District 8[edit]

The 8th district is based in northern Virginia and encompasses the inner Washington, D.C. suburbs, including Arlington, Alexandria, and Falls Church. The incumbent is Democrat Don Beyer, who was re-elected with 76.1% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Potential[edit]

District 9[edit]

The 9th district takes in rural southwest Virginia, including Abingdon, Blacksburg, and Salem. The incumbent is Republican Morgan Griffith, who was re-elected with 65.2% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Potential[edit]

District 10[edit]

The 10th district is based in northern Virginia and the D.C. metro area, encompassing Loudoun and parts of Fairfax and Prince William counties. The incumbent is Democrat Jennifer Wexton, who flipped the district and was elected with 56.1% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Potential[edit]

Republican primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Declared[edit]

District 11[edit]

The 11th district encompasses the southern and western suburbs of Washington, D.C., including Dale City, Fairfax, and Reston. The incumbent is Democrat Gerry Connolly, who was re-elected with 71.1% of the vote in 2018.[1]

Democratic primary[edit]

Candidates[edit]

Potential[edit]

Notes[edit]

Partisan clients
  1. ^ Poll sponsored by Club for Growth Action

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Wasserman, David; Flinn, Ally (November 7, 2018). "2018 House Popular Vote Tracker". Cook Political Report. Retrieved February 15, 2019.
  2. ^ https://twitter.com/ReElectWittman/status/1153419011507535873
  3. ^ "Vangie Williams enters 2020 1st Congressional District race". The Virginia Gazette. January 14, 2019. Retrieved April 15, 2019.
  4. ^ Gerber, Drew (March 20, 2019). "Scott Taylor Considering Warner Challenge". National Journal. Retrieved March 22, 2019.
  5. ^ Associated Press (July 8, 2019). "Former Rep. Scott Taylor announces US Senate bid in Virginia". Washington Post. Retrieved July 8, 2019.
  6. ^ https://docquery.fec.gov/pdf/288/201904249149584288/201904249149584288.pdf
  7. ^ a b Weyrich, Matt (September 4, 2019). "Meet the candidates: The 2020 5th District ballot is already crowded". C Ville. Retrieved September 5, 2019.
  8. ^ Huffstetler, Roger Dean [@rdhjr] (April 2, 2019). "Today, I'm excited to announce I am running for Congress here in the Fifth District of Virginia. It's simple — we need to keep fighting for the country we want to live in. Let's go flip this house seat! Join me at rdforva.com" (Tweet). Retrieved April 2, 2019 – via Twitter.
  9. ^ Servin Smith, Ruth (August 7, 2019). "UVa doctor Cameron Webb declares 2020 run against Rep. Denver Riggleman in 5th District". The Charlottesville Daily Progress. Retrieved August 7, 2019.
  10. ^ Cockburn, Leslie [@LeslieCockburn] (April 15, 2019). "I'm not running in 2020 in Virginia 5 but RD has declared and at least three more great candidate are seriously considering. Stay tuned!" (Tweet). Retrieved April 15, 2019 – via Twitter.
  11. ^ Vozzella, Laura (April 29, 2019). "Republican announces bid to unseat Rep. Spanberger in Virginia's 7th District". The Washington Post. Retrieved April 29, 2019.
  12. ^ a b c Leahy, Norman (May 1, 2019). "Virginia's 7th District race gets started". The Washington Post. Retrieved May 1, 2019.
  13. ^ Wasserman, David (March 1, 2019). "2020 House Overview: Can Democrats Keep Their Majority?". Cook Political Report. Retrieved March 1, 2019.
  14. ^ Portnoy, Jenna (May 28, 2019). "Rep. Abigail Spanberger: A moderate Democrat working to survive in the AOC era". The Washington Post. Retrieved May 29, 2019.
  15. ^ https://docquery.fec.gov/pdf/827/201908059161356827/201908059161356827.pdf
  16. ^ Portnoy, Jenna (July 3, 2019). "First Republican enters race to challenge Rep. Wexton in 2020". The Washington Post. Retrieved July 6, 2019.
  17. ^ Cimmino, Jeffrey (July 22, 2019). "Double-Amputee Veteran Challenging Wexton (D) for Virginia Congressional Seat". Washington Free Beacon. Retrieved July 22, 2019.

External links[edit]

Official campaign websites for 1st district candidates
Official campaign websites for 3rd district candidates
Official campaign websites for 5th district candidates
Official campaign websites for 7th district candidates
Official campaign websites for 10th district candidates