2020 United States presidential election in South Carolina

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2020 United States presidential election in South Carolina

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The 2020 United States presidential election in South Carolina is scheduled to take place on Tuesday, November 3, 2020, as part of the 2020 United States elections in which all 50 states plus the District of Columbia will participate.[1] South Carolina voters will choose electors to represent them in the Electoral College via a popular vote. The state of South Carolina has 9 electoral votes in the Electoral College.[2]

As of January 2019, Donald Trump is the declared Republican candidate, and state representatives of the Republican party have indicated interest in suspending the Republican primary process in the state to favor him, which the state previously did for George W. Bush in 2004.[3][4] Former South Carolina governor Nikki Haley is considered to be a potential primary opponent for Trump, although as of January 2019 she has endorsed his candidacy and declined to run against him.[5][6][7][8] Mark Sanford, also a former South Carolina governor, and a Republican similarly declined.[9][10]

A number of Democrats are running or have expressed interest in running, and Elizabeth Warren, Kamala Harris, and Bernie Sanders are among the major declared candidates.[11][12][13] Additionally, Kirsten Gillibrand has formed an exploratory committee.[14]

Polling[edit]

with Donald Trump and Joe Biden
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin
of error
Donald
Trump (R)
Joe
Biden (D)
Undecided
Emerson College Feb 28 – Mar 2, 2019 755 ± 3.5% 52% 48%
with Donald Trump and Cory Booker
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin
of error
Donald
Trump (R)
Cory
Booker (D)
Undecided
Emerson College Feb 28 – Mar 2, 2019 755 ± 3.5% 54% 46%
with Donald Trump and Kamala Harris
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin
of error
Donald
Trump (R)
Kamala
Harris (D)
Undecided
Emerson College Feb 28 – Mar 2, 2019 755 ± 3.5% 56% 44%
with Donald Trump and Amy Klobuchar
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin
of error
Donald
Trump (R)
Amy
Klobuchar (D)
Undecided
Emerson College Feb 28 – Mar 2, 2019 755 ± 3.5% 56% 44%
with Donald Trump and Beto O'Rourke
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin
of error
Donald
Trump (R)
Beto
O'Rourke (D)
Undecided
Emerson College Feb 28 – Mar 2, 2019 755 ± 3.5% 56% 44%
with Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin
of error
Donald
Trump (R)
Bernie
Sanders (D)
Undecided
Emerson College Feb 28 – Mar 2, 2019 755 ± 3.5% 54% 46%
with Donald Trump, Bernie Sanders, and Howard Schultz
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin
of error
Donald
Trump (R)
Bernie
Sanders (D)
Howard
Schultz (I)
Undecided
Emerson College Feb 28 – Mar 2, 2019 755 ± 3.5% 51% 42% 7%
with Donald Trump and Elizabeth Warren
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin
of error
Donald
Trump (R)
Elizabeth
Warren (D)
Undecided
Emerson College Feb 28 – Mar 2, 2019 755 ± 3.5% 54% 46%
with Donald Trump, Elizabeth Warren, and Howard Schultz
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin
of error
Donald
Trump (R)
Elizabeth
Warren (D)
Howard
Schultz (I)
Undecided
Emerson College Feb 28 – Mar 2, 2019 755 ± 3.5% 53% 41% 7%
Hypothetical polling
with Donald Trump, generic Democrat, and Howard Schultz
Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin
of error
Donald
Trump (R)
Generic
Democrat
Howard
Schultz (I)
Undecided
WPA Intelligence (R)[A] Mar 11–13, 2019 500 ± 4.4% 46% 34% 3% 17%

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Kelly, Ben (August 13, 2018). "US elections key dates: When are the 2018 midterms and the 2020 presidential campaign?". The Independent. Retrieved January 3, 2019.
  2. ^ "Distribution of Electoral Votes". National Archives and Records Administration. Retrieved January 3, 2019.
  3. ^ Kilgore, Ed (January 2, 2019). "Republicans Could Cancel Primaries to Protect Trump From a Challenge". New York. Retrieved January 3, 2019.
  4. ^ Buck, Rebecca (December 19, 2018). "South Carolina GOP could forgo 2020 presidential primary in support of Trump". CNN. Retrieved January 3, 2019.
  5. ^ Bailey, Isaac (19 October 2018). "Nikki Haley Is the GOP's Best Chance to Win in 2020". Politico Magazine. Retrieved January 3, 2018.
  6. ^ Chira, Susan (April 14, 2017). "Is This the Way a Woman Will Reach the White House?". The New York Times. Retrieved May 10, 2017.
  7. ^ Schleifer, Theodore (April 13, 2017). "Haley says Trump doesn't limit her foreign policy bullhorn". CNN. Retrieved April 13, 2017.
  8. ^ Strassner, Elizabeth (November 23, 2016). "Could Nikki Haley Still Run For President In 2020? Joining Donald Trump's Cabinet Doesn't Rule Out Challenging Him". Bustle. Retrieved March 5, 2017.
  9. ^ Byrd, Caitlin (June 13, 2018). "Mark Sanford returns to Congress, warning Republicans his loss is 'a wake-up call'". The Post and Courier. Retrieved June 14, 2018.
  10. ^ "Sanford on prospect of 2020 White House run". CNN. April 23, 2017. Retrieved February 14, 2018.
  11. ^ Taylor, Kate (9 February 2019). "Elizabeth Warren Formally Announces 2020 Presidential Bid in Lawrence, Mass". The New York Times. Retrieved 10 February 2019.
  12. ^ Zhou, Li (21 January 2019). "Kamala Harris announces her historic 2020 presidential campaign". Vox. Retrieved 10 February 2019.
  13. ^ Detrow, Scott (1 February 2019). "Cory Booker Makes It Official: He's Running For President In 2020". NPR. Retrieved 10 February 2019.
  14. ^ Herndon, Astead W.; Burns, Alexander (December 31, 2018). "Elizabeth Warren Announces Iowa Trip as She Starts Running for President in 2020". The New York Times. Retrieved January 3, 2019.


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