2022 United States gubernatorial elections

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2022 United States gubernatorial elections

← 2021 November 8, 2022 2023 →

39 governorships
36 states; 3 territories

United States gubernatorial elections, 2022.png
2022 gubernatorial map

  Democratic incumbent
  Republican incumbent
  Undetermined incumbent

  No election

United States gubernatorial elections will be held on November 8, 2022, in 36 states and three territories. In addition, special elections may take place (depending on state law) if other gubernatorial seats are vacated.

As most governors serve four year terms, the last regular gubernatorial elections for all but two of the seats took place in 2018. The governors of New Hampshire and Vermont, each of whom serve two year terms, are up for election in 2020. The 2022 gubernatorial elections will take place concurrently with several other federal, state, and local elections.

Race summary[edit]

State Governor Party First elected Last race Status Candidates
Alabama Kay Ivey Republican 2017[a] 59.5% R Eligible
Alaska Mike Dunleavy Republican 2018 51.4% R Eligible
Arizona Doug Ducey Republican 2014 56.0% R Term-limited
Arkansas Asa Hutchinson Republican 2014 65.3% R Term-limited
California Gavin Newsom Democratic 2018 61.9% D Eligible
Colorado Jared Polis Democratic 2018 53.4% D Eligible
Connecticut Ned Lamont Democratic 2018 49.4% D Eligible
Florida Ron DeSantis Republican 2018 49.6% R Eligible
Georgia Brian Kemp Republican 2018 50.2% R Eligible
Hawaii David Ige Democratic 2014 62.7% D Term-limited
Idaho Brad Little Republican 2018 59.8% R Eligible
Illinois J. B. Pritzker Democratic 2018 54.5% D Eligible
Iowa Kim Reynolds Republican 2017[b] 50.3% R Eligible
Kansas Laura Kelly Democratic 2018 48.0% D Eligible
Maine Janet Mills Democratic 2018 50.9% D Eligible
Maryland Larry Hogan Republican 2014 55.4% R Term-limited
Massachusetts Charlie Baker Republican 2014 66.6% R Eligible
Michigan Gretchen Whitmer Democratic 2018 53.3% D Eligible
Minnesota Tim Walz DFL 2018 53.8% D Eligible
Nebraska Pete Ricketts Republican 2014 59.0% R Term-limited Bob Krist (D)[1]
Nevada Steve Sisolak Democratic 2018 49.4% D Eligible
New Hampshire TBD TBD TBD TBD To be determined in the 2020 election.
New Mexico Michelle Lujan Grisham Democratic 2018 57.2% D Eligible
New York Andrew Cuomo Democratic 2010 59.6% D Running Andrew Cuomo (D)[2]
Ohio Mike DeWine Republican 2018 50.4% R Eligible
Oklahoma Kevin Stitt Republican 2018 54.3% R Eligible
Oregon Kate Brown Democratic 2015[c] 50.1% D Term-limited
Pennsylvania Tom Wolf Democratic 2014 57.8% D Term-limited
Rhode Island Gina Raimondo Democratic 2014 52.6% D Term-limited
South Carolina Henry McMaster Republican 2017[d] 54.0% R Eligible
South Dakota Kristi Noem Republican 2018 51.0% R Eligible
Tennessee Bill Lee Republican 2018 59.6% R Eligible
Texas Greg Abbott Republican 2014 55.8% R Running Greg Abbott (R)[3]
Vermont TBD TBD TBD TBD To be determined in the 2020 election.
Wisconsin Tony Evers Democratic 2018 49.5% D Eligible
Wyoming Mark Gordon Republican 2018 67.1% R Eligible

Republican incumbents eligible for re-election[edit]

Kay Ivey (Alabama)[edit]

Governor Kay Ivey took office on April 10, 2017 upon the resignation of Robert J. Bentley and was elected to a full term at her own right in 2018 with 59.5% of the vote. She is eligible to run for re-election for a second full term, but has not yet stated whether she will do so.

Mike Dunleavey (Alaska)[edit]

Governor Mike Dunleavy was elected in 2018 with 51.4% of the vote.. He is eligible to run for re-election, but has not yet stated whether he will do so.

Ron DeSantis (Florida)[edit]

Governor Ron DeSantis was elected in 2018 with 49.6% of the vote. He is eligible to run for re-election, but has not yet stated whether he will do so.

Brian Kemp (Georgia)[edit]

Governor Brian Kemp was elected in 2018 with 50.2% of the vote. He is eligible to run for re-election, but has not yet stated whether he will do so.

Brad Little (Idaho)[edit]

Governor Brad Little was elected in 2018 with 59.8% of the vote. He is eligible to run for re-election, but has not yet stated whether he will do so.

Kim Reynolds (Iowa)[edit]

Governor Kim Reynolds took office on May 24, 2017, upon the resignation of Terry Branstad and was elected to a full term at her own right in 2018 with 50.3% of the vote. She is eligible to run for re-election for a second full term, but has not yet stated whether she will do so.

Charlie Baker (Massachusetts)[edit]

Governor Charlie Baker was re-elected to a second term in 2018 with 66.6% of the vote. Because Massachusetts does not have gubernatorial term limits in its Constitution, he is eligible to run for re-election for a third term, but has not yet stated whether he will do so.

Mike DeWine (Ohio)[edit]

Governor Mike DeWine was elected in 2018 with 50.4% of the vote. He is eligible to run for re-election, but has not yet stated whether he will do so.

Kevin Stitt (Oklahoma)[edit]

Governor Kevin Stitt was elected in 2018 with 54.3% of the vote. He is eligible to run for re-election, but has not yet stated whether he will do so.

Henry McMaster (South Carolina)[edit]

Governor Henry McMaster took office on January 24, 2017, upon the resignation of Nikki Haley and was elected to a full term at his own right in 2018 with 54% of the vote. He is eligible to run for re-election for a second full term, but has not yet stated whether he will do so.

Kristi Noem (South Dakota)[edit]

Governor Kristi Noem was elected in 2018 with 51% of the vote. She is eligible to run for re-election, but has not yet stated whether she will do so.

Bill Lee (Tennessee)[edit]

Governor Bill Lee was elected in 2018 with 59.6% of the vote. He is eligible to run for re-election, but has not yet stated whether he will do so.

Greg Abbott (Texas)[edit]

Governor Greg Abbott was re-elected to a second term in 2018 with 55.8% of the vote. Because Texas does not have gubernatorial term limits in its Constitution, he is eligible to run for re-election for a third term, and has announced he will do so.[4]

Mark Gordon (Wyoming)[edit]

Governor Mark Gordon was elected in 2018 with 67.1% of the vote. He is eligible to run for re-election, but has not yet stated whether he will do so.

Retiring and term-limited Republican incumbents[edit]

Doug Ducey (Arizona)[edit]

Governor Doug Ducey was re-elected to a second term in 2018 with 56% of the vote. He will be term-limited from the Arizona Constitution in 2022 and will not seek re-election for a third consecutive term.

Asa Hutchinson (Arkansas)[edit]

Governor Asa Hutchinson was re-elected to a second term in 2018 with 65.3% of the vote. He will be term-limited from the Arkansas Constitution in 2022 and cannot seek re-election for a third term. Arkansas is one of the eight states of the United States that limits its governor to two terms for life, along with California, Delaware, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, Nevada, and Oklahoma.

Larry Hogan (Maryland)[edit]

Governor Larry Hogan was re-elected to a second term in 2018 with 55.4% of the vote. He will be term-limited from the Maryland Constitution in 2022 and will not seek re-election for a third consecutive term.

Pete Ricketts (Nebraska)[edit]

Governor Pete Ricketts was re-elected to a second term in 2018 with 59% of the vote. He will be term-limited from the Nebraska Constitution in 2022 and will not seek re-election for a third consecutive term.

Democratic incumbents eligible for re-election[edit]

Gavin Newsom (California)[edit]

Governor Gavin Newsom was elected in 2018 with 61.9% of the vote. He is eligible to run for re-election, but has not yet stated whether he will do so.

Jared Polis (Colorado)[edit]

Governor Jared Polis was elected in 2018 with 53.4% of the vote. He is eligible to run for re-election, but has not yet stated whether he will do so.

Ned Lamont (Connecticut)[edit]

Governor Ned Lamont was elected in 2018 with 49.4% of the vote. He is eligible to run for re-election, but has not yet stated whether he will do so.

J. B. Pritzker (Illinois)[edit]

Governor J. B. Pritzker was elected in 2018 with 54.5% of the vote. He is eligible to run for re-election, but has not yet stated whether he will do so.

Laura Kelly (Kansas)[edit]

Governor Laura Kelly was elected in 2018 with 48% of the vote. She is eligible to run for re-election, but has not yet stated whether she will do so.

Janet Mills (Maine)[edit]

Governor Janet Mills was elected in 2018 with 50.9% of the vote. She is eligible to run for re-election, but has not yet stated whether she will do so. Former governor Paul LePage is a potential Republican candidate.[5][6]

Gretchen Whitmer (Michigan)[edit]

Governor Gretchen Whitmer was elected in 2018 with 53.3% of the vote. She is eligible to run for re-election, but has not yet stated whether she will do so.

Tim Walz (Minnesota)[edit]

Governor Tim Walz was elected in 2018 with 53.8% of the vote. He is eligible to run for re-election, but has not yet stated whether he will do so.

Steve Sisolak (Nevada)[edit]

Governor Steve Sisolak was elected in 2018 with 49.4% of the vote. He is eligible to run for re-election, but has not yet stated whether he will do so.

Michelle Lujan Grisham (New Mexico)[edit]

Governor Michelle Lujan Grisham was elected in 2018 with 57.2% of the vote. She is eligible to run for re-election, but has not yet stated whether she will do so.

Andrew Cuomo (New York)[edit]

Governor Andrew Cuomo was re-elected to a third term in 2018 with 59.6% of the vote. Because New York does not have gubernatorial term limits in its Constitution, he is eligible to run for re-election for a fourth term. On May 28, 2019, Cuomo announced that he is running for re-election for a fourth term in 2022.[7][8]

Tony Evers (Wisconsin)[edit]

Governor Tony Evers was elected in 2018 with 49.5% of the vote. He is eligible to run for re-election, but has not yet stated whether he will do so.

Retiring and term-limited Democratic incumbents[edit]

David Ige (Hawaii)[edit]

Governor David Ige was re-elected to a second term in 2018 with 62.7% of the vote. He will be term-limited from the Hawaii Constitution in 2022 and will not seek re-election for a third consecutive term.

Kate Brown (Oregon)[edit]

Governor Kate Brown took office on February 18, 2015 upon the resignation of John Kitzhaber. She was subsequently elected in the gubernatorial special election in 2016 and was re-elected to a full term in 2018 with 50.1% of the vote. She will be term-limited from the Oregon Constitution in 2022 and will not seek re-election for a second consecutive full term.

Tom Wolf (Pennsylvania)[edit]

Governor Tom Wolf was re-elected to a second term in 2018 with 57.8% of the vote. He will be term-limited from the Pennsylvania Constitution in 2022 and will not seek re-election for a third consecutive term.

Gina Raimondo (Rhode Island)[edit]

Governor Gina Raimondo was re-elected to a second term in 2018 with 52.6% of the vote. She will be term-limited from the Rhode Island Constitution in 2022 and will not seek re-election for a third consecutive term.

Undetermined incumbents[edit]

New Hampshire[edit]

Because the governor of New Hampshire is elected to two year terms, the incumbent remains unknown until 2020.

Vermont[edit]

Because the governor of Vermont is elected to two year terms, the incumbent remains unknown until 2020.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Kay Ivey took office in 2017 after her predecessor (Robert J. Bentley) resigned.
  2. ^ Kim Reynolds took office in 2017 after her predecessor (Terry Branstad) resigned.
  3. ^ Kate Brown took office in 2015 after her predecessor (John Kitzhaber) resigned. She was subsequently elected in the 2016 special gubernatorial election.
  4. ^ Henry McMaster took office in 2017 after his predecessor (Nikki Haley) resigned.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Maddox, Tiffany (2019-04-26). "Senator Bob Krist will run for governor for 2022". KFXL. Retrieved 2019-06-28.
  2. ^ https://thehill.com/homenews/state-watch/445814-cuomo-says-hell-run-for-fourth-term-as-ny-governor
  3. ^ https://www.statesman.com/news/20190614/tilove-abbott-says-biden-will-fade-and-trump-will-win-texas
  4. ^ https://www.statesman.com/news/20190614/tilove-abbott-says-biden-will-fade-and-trump-will-win-texas
  5. ^ "LePage says he will run again in 2022 if he doesn't like Mills's performance". WCSH-TV. December 11, 2018. Retrieved December 11, 2018.
  6. ^ "LePage Vows To Run Against Mills In 2022 If She Doesn't Expand Medicaid 'Sustainably'". MPBN. November 14, 2018. Retrieved January 3, 2019.
  7. ^ https://thehill.com/homenews/state-watch/445814-cuomo-says-hell-run-for-fourth-term-as-ny-governor
  8. ^ https://www.cbsnews.com/news/andrew-cuomo-says-hell-run-for-fourth-term-as-governor/

External links[edit]