Abu Imran al-Fasi

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Abu Imran al-Fasi
Personal
Born974
Died(1039-06-08)June 8, 1039
ReligionIslam
DenominationSunni
JurisprudenceMaliki
CreedAsh'ari[1]
Muslim leader

Abū ʿImrān al-Fāsī mūsā ibn ʿīsā ibn abī ḥāj̲j̲ (or ḥaj̲j̲āj̲) (also known as simply known as Abū ʿImrān al- Fāsī, born between 975 and 978, died 8 June 1039) was a Moroccan Maliki faqīh born at Fez into a Berber family whose nisba is impossible to reconstruct.[2]

Biography[edit]

Abū ʿImrān was probably born between 975 and 978 at Fes into a Berber family. He went to Ifriqiya, where he settled in al-Kairouan and studied under al-Kabisi (d. 1012). Some time later, he stayed in Cordova with Ibn Abd al-Barr and followed the lectures of various scholars there, which his biographers list.[3] He is regarded a saint by later Sufi mystics. He played an important role in the history of the Almoravid dynasty. It was his teaching in Qayrawan (Tunisia) that first stirred Yahya ibn Ibrahim, who was returning from the Pilgrimage and attended Abu Imran's courses. The thing that inspired the foundation of the Almoravids.[2][4] He wrote a commentary on the Mudawana of Sahnun.

Qadi Ayyad (d.544/1129), author of the Kitab Shifa bitarif huquq al-Mustapha (The Antidote in knowing the rights of the Chosen Prophet), hagiographied Abu Imran al-Fasi in his Tadrib a-Madarik (Exercising Perception), an encyclopaedia of Maliki scholars.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "حول العقيدة الأشعرية". Retrieved 11 July 2014.
  2. ^ a b Pellat, Ch. (2004). "Abū ʿImrān al-Fāsī". In Bearman, P.; Bianquis, Th.; Bosworth, C.E.; van Donzel, E.; Heinrichs, W.P. (eds.). Encyclopaedia of Islam. XII (2nd ed.). Leiden, Netherlands: Brill Publishers. p. 27. ISBN 9004139745.
  3. ^ Pellat, Ch. (2004). "Abū ʿImrān al-Fāsī". In Bearman, P.; Bianquis, Th.; Bosworth, C.E.; van Donzel, E.; Heinrichs, W.P. (eds.). Encyclopaedia of Islam. XII (2nd ed.). Leiden, Netherlands: Brill Publishers. p. 26. ISBN 9004139745.
  4. ^ "Rethinking the Almoravids", in: Julia Ann Clancy-Smith North Africa, Islam and the Mediterranean World, Routledge, 2001, p. 60-61