Bill Hightower

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Bill Hightower
Member of the Alabama Senate
from the 35th district
In office
2013–2018
Preceded byBen Brooks
Succeeded byDavid Sessions
Personal details
Born1959 (age 59–60)
Political partyRepublican
Spouse(s)Susan Hightower
EducationUniversity of South Alabama
(BS)
Vanderbilt University (MBA)
WebsiteOfficial website

Bill Hightower (born 1959) is an American politician from the state of Alabama. From 2013 through 2018, he was a Republican member of the Alabama Senate, representing the 35th district.[1]

Biography[edit]

Hightower was raised in Mobile, Alabama, where his father worked at the University of South Alabama's medical center.[2] Hightower graduated from the University of South Alabama with a Bachelor of Science in business and finance in 1984. After working in a textile factory in Saraland, Alabama, he attended Vanderbilt University, where he earned a Master of Business Administration in 1990.[3]

Hightower owns a corporate consulting firm.[1] Hightower and his wife, Susan, have three children. They lived in the suburbs around Pittsburgh during the September 11 attacks, which made them decide to return to Alabama. Susan ran for the Alabama House of Representatives seat for the 103rd district in 2013, but lost to Margie Wilcox.[2]

Political career[edit]

Hightower won a special election to the Alabama Senate on March 12, 2013, to succeed Ben Brooks.[1] In 2014, the Sunlight Foundation ranked Hightower as the fourth-most conservative member of the state senate.[4] Hightower was re-elected in November 2014.

Hightower ran for governor of Alabama in the 2018 election.[2] He finished in fourth place in the Republican primary, receiving 4% of the vote, and endorsed Kay Ivey in the general election.[5]

With Bradley Byrne, who represents Alabama's 1st congressional district in the United States House of Representatives, opting not to run for reelection in the 2020 elections, Hightower announced his candidacy to succeed Byrne in April 2019.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Mimms, Sarah. "Five Names To Know In Alabama 01". National Journal. Archived from the original on June 8, 2013. Retrieved June 23, 2017.
  2. ^ a b c Sharp, John (April 23, 2018). "Bill Hightower, in 'uphill battle' to governor's mansion, banks on 'diverse business' background". AL.com. Retrieved August 7, 2019.
  3. ^ Lyman, Brian (May 13, 2018). "Bill Hightower wants to change the governing process". Montgomery Advertiser. Retrieved August 7, 2019.
  4. ^ Gore, Leada (June 16, 2014). "Ranking the most conservative and most liberal members of the Alabama Senate: Today in politics". AL.com. Retrieved August 7, 2019.
  5. ^ Reporter, Lee Peck FOX10 News. "Sen. Bill Hightower: "It was an honor to run, let's now get behind Kay Ivey"". FOX10 News. Retrieved August 7, 2019.
  6. ^ Sharp, John (April 16, 2019). "Bill Hightower announces run for Congress". AL.com. Retrieved August 7, 2019.

External links[edit]