Bryce Reeves

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Bryce Reeves
Bryce Reeves Photo.jpeg
Member of the Virginia Senate
from the 17th district
Assumed office
January 11, 2012
Preceded byEdd Houck
Personal details
Born (1966-11-28) November 28, 1966 (age 52)
Canoga Park, California, U.S.
Political partyRepublican
Spouse(s)Anne Reeves
ChildrenJack, Nicole
ResidenceSpotsylvania County, Virginia
Alma materTexas A&M University (B.S.)
George Mason University (M.P.A.)
ProfessionInsurance Agent
CommitteesGeneral Laws and Technology; Privileges and Elections; Rehabilitation and Social Services; Courts of Justice
Websitewww.brycereeves.com

Bryce E. Reeves (born November 28, 1966, in California) is a Republican Virginia State Senator. A State Farm insurance agent, he was elected in 2011.[1] Reeves narrowly defeated the 28-year Democratic incumbent, Edd Houck, by 226 votes.[2]

Reeves currently represents the 17th district in the central part of the state, consisting of Albemarle County (Part), Culpeper County (Part), Fredericksburg City (All), Louisa County (Part), Orange County (All), and Spotsylvania County (Part).[3] Senator Reeves serves on the Courts of Justice, General Laws and Technology, Privileges and Elections, and the Rehabilitation and Social Services committees. He is also the co-chair of the Military Caucus.[4]

In 2017, he entered the Republican primary for Lieutenant Governor,[5] but lost to State Senator Jill Vogel.[6]

He lives in Spotsylvania County, Virginia with his wife Anne and their two children, Nicole and Jack.[7]

Awards[edit]

GOPAC 2012 Emerging Leader Award[8]

Virginia Association of Commonwealth's Attorneys Champion of Justice Award, 2012[9]

VA Chamber of Commerce Economic Competitive Award, 2013[10]

Co-Chair for GOPAC Emerging Leaders Program, 2013[11]

GOPAC Advisory Board, 2014[12]

Conservative Leader Award by the American Conservative Union Foundation, 2012 & 2013[13]

Virginia Bicycling Federation Award, 2014 & 2015[14]

Electoral History[edit]

Date Election Candidate Party Votes %
Senate of Virginia, 17th District
Nov 8, 2011[15] General Bryce E. Reeves Republican 22,615 50.16
Robert Edward "Edd" Houck Democratic 22,389 49.66
Write Ins 76 0.16
Nov. 3, 2015[16] General Bryce E. Reeves Republican 24,519 62.09
Ned Gallaway Democratic 14,915 37.77
Write Ins 53 0.14

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Bryce E. Reeves". Senate of Virginia. Retrieved 2016-03-18.
  2. ^ "November 2011 General Election Unofficial Results". Virginia State Board of Elections. Archived from the original on 2012-11-24. Retrieved 2011-05-08.
  3. ^ "Virginia's 17th District". Bryce Reeves for Virginia Senate. Archived from the original on 2016-03-17. Retrieved 2016-03-18.
  4. ^ "Bryce E. Reeves". Senate of Virginia. Retrieved 2016-03-18.
  5. ^ Vozzella, Laura. "Soap operatic GOP race for Va. lieutenant governor to play out in courtroom". Washington Post. Retrieved 5 February 2019.
  6. ^ The New York Times. "Virginia Primary Results: Northam Will Face Gillespie in Governor's Race". New York Times. Retrieved 5 February 2019.
  7. ^ "About Bryce Reeves". Bryce Reeves for Virginia Senate. Retrieved 2016-03-18.
  8. ^ "GOPAC Announces 2012 Class of Emerging Leaders". GOPAC. Retrieved 2016-03-18.
  9. ^ "Bryce Reeves". Sorensen Institute. Retrieved 2016-03-18.
  10. ^ "Virginia Chamber Releases 2013 Legislative Report Card". Virginia Chamber of Commerce. Retrieved 2016-03-18.
  11. ^ "The GOPAC Newsletter: May 2013". GOPAC. Retrieved 2016-03-18.
  12. ^ "Legislative Leaders Advisory Board". GOPAC. Retrieved 2016-03-18.
  13. ^ "American Conservative Union Announces Second Annual Conservative Ratings of the Virginia General Assembly". The American Conservative Union. Archived from the original on 2016-03-25. Retrieved 2016-03-18.
  14. ^ "Three Virginia Legislators Receive Bicycling Friendly Awards". Virginia Bicycling Federation. Retrieved 2016-03-18.
  15. ^ "State Senate District 17 2011 Election Results". Virginia Public Access Project. Retrieved 2016-03-18.
  16. ^ "State Senate District 17 2015 Election Results". Virginia Public Access Project. Retrieved 2016-03-18.

External links[edit]