Champions of the Force

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Champions of the Force
Championsoftheforce.jpg
AuthorKevin J. Anderson
Cover artistJohn Alvin
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish
SeriesThe Jedi Academy trilogy
Canon C
SubjectStar Wars
GenreScience fiction
PublisherBantam Spectra
Publication date
October 1, 1994
Media typePaperback
Pages324
ISBN0-553-29802-X
OCLC31147500
813.54[1]
Preceded byDark Apprentice 
Followed byChildren of the Jedi 

Champions of the Force is the third novel in the Jedi Academy Trilogy by Kevin J. Anderson.

Summary[edit]

Kyp Durron continued his rampage to destroy the Galactic Empire with the Sun Crusher to avenge his brother (whom he inadvertently kills when he destroys Carida). Luke, who was in a suspended animation state after the fight between himself and Exar Kun, made every attempt he can to save his body from the evil spirit of Exar Kun. After reaching out to the Jedi twins, he warns them about the danger. In the end, all the apprentices unite and Exar Kun is destroyed. After the death of Exar Kun, Kyp comes to the light side again. Luke forgives Kyp but many throughout the galaxy, especially the Empire, shall hate him forever. Kyp takes the Sun Crusher into the Maw to destroy it.

After Wedge Antilles and his group of fighters reach the Maw Installation, the last of Admiral Daala's ships, the Gorgon, limps back to Imperial installation in the Maw near Kessel. After destroying the installation and blowing an ionic asteroid, Admiral Daala successfully fakes her death and escapes. Meanwhile, Bevel Lemelisk and his group of scientists escape on the prototype Death Star. Before they could go far, Kyp crashes his ship, the Sun Crusher into the prototype and hauls both ships into a black hole. Kyp escapes by getting into a pod.

Now Kyp has redeemed himself to the Jedi Order, himself, and Luke.

Influences[edit]

The novel introduces FIDO (Foreign Intruder Defense Organism), a semi-organic droid defensive system set up to defend the Solo children. Kevin J. Anderson has said that the name was a reference to the FidoNet Star Wars Echo, an on-line message board that he took part in at the time.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Classify An experimental classification web service". OCLC Classify. OCLC. Retrieved February 15, 2017.

External links[edit]