Cheryl Pflug

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Cheryl Pflug
Member of the Washington Senate
from the 5th district
In office
2004 – July 2012
Succeeded byDino Rossi
Member of the Washington House of Representatives
from the 5th district
In office
1999–2004
Succeeded byJay Rodne
Personal details
Political partyRepublican
Alma materB.S. University of Washington, J.D. Seattle University

Cheryl Pflug is an American politician of the Republican Party. She was a member of the Washington State Senate from 2004 to 2012.[1][2][3]

Early life and education[edit]

Pflug earned her B.S. in Nursing from the University of Washington and worked as a critical care and operating room nurse[4] while raising 4 children on a family farm adjacent to the Cedar River Watershed. She received a J.D. from Seattle University School of Law in 2012 and was admitted to the Bar in 2014.[5]

State legislature[edit]

Pflug served the 5th District in the State Legislature for nearly 14 years before being appointed to the Growth Management Hearings Board by Governor Gregoire in May 2012.[6] The 5th District straddles the Urban Growth Line, causing local governments to continually struggle to balance the need for infrastructure and services with a commitment to preserving community character, open space, fish habitat and pristine recreational areas.[6] Over the course of her legislative career, Pflug used her health care experience to improve health outcomes while reducing unnecessary costs,[4] authoring several first-in-the-nation innovations that were adopted into law[4][7] and pushing through legislation to give the office of the Attorney General strong tools to prosecute multimillion-dollar corporate Medicaid fraud schemes.[8][9][10] Pflug also championed infrastructure,[6] education,http://www.issaquahpress.com/2012/05/29/state-sen-cheryl-pflug-departs-suddenly-to-accept-board-post/ hatchery and parks improvements[11] to support the needs of the rapidly growing communities she represented.[12][13]

As a legislator, Pflug earned a reputation as "an independent workhorse"[4] willing to work across party lines.[14] She crafted legislation to create treatment alternatives for nonviolent mentally-ill misdemeanants[10] and cast the decisive vote to create a simple-majority requirement for school levies.[4] In 2008, Pflug was honored with the commission of Washington General for commitment to her community and service to the state of Washington,[15] and the "Champion of Freedom Award" in 2012.[16]

Often questioned for her growing cynicism,[17] Pflug also paid a price for defying her party leaders[18] but rarely backed down.[19][20]

Appointment to the Growth Management Planning Board[edit]

In May 2012, Governor Christine Gregoire nominated Pflug to a seat on the Growth Management Planning Board.

Following the appointment, Republican Party Chairman Kirby Wilbur suggested the appointment was a "deal" to give the Democrats her Senate seat, an allegation called "hypocritical" by observers.[21]

Pflug resigned her Senate seat on June 30, 2012, the day before her Growth Board appointment commenced on July 1, 2012.[6] On July 11, 2012, Dino Rossi was appointed to fill the term of Pflug.[22] In November 2012, Mark Mullet was elected to represent the 5th legislative district in the senate.

Post-legislative career[edit]

In July 2012, Pflug was featured in the first Washington television ad supporting same-sex marriage.[23] The ad aired during the opening ceremonies for the Summer Olympic Games.[23]

References[edit]

  1. ^ [1]
  2. ^ "The Voter's Self Defense System". Vote Smart. Retrieved 21 November 2017.
  3. ^ Email submission to Ballotpedia, May 16, 2012
  4. ^ a b c d e "Cheryl Pflug in the 5th Legislative District". Seattletimes.com. 12 August 2008. Retrieved 21 November 2017.
  5. ^ [2]
  6. ^ a b c d "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2015-02-05. Retrieved 2015-04-22.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  7. ^ "Washington Becomes First State to Endorse Shared Medical Decision Making. - Free Online Library". Thefreelibrary.com. Retrieved 21 November 2017.
  8. ^ "Legislature should keep simple tool to fight Medicaid fraud". Seattletimes.com. 30 March 2015. Retrieved 21 November 2017.
  9. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2015-07-13. Retrieved 2015-04-22.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  10. ^ a b "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2015-07-13. Retrieved 2015-04-22.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  11. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2015-07-13. Retrieved 2015-04-22.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  12. ^ "GMHB Profiles". Gmhb.wa.gov. Archived from the original on 1 December 2017. Retrieved 21 November 2017.
  13. ^ "The Issaquah Press October 27 Page 4". Gmhb.wa.gov. Retrieved 21 November 2017.
  14. ^ "Eastside legislative races". Seattletimes.com. 16 October 2008. Retrieved 21 November 2017.
  15. ^ "Pflug named a Washington General". Flickr.com. Retrieved 21 November 2017.
  16. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2015-07-13. Retrieved 2015-04-22.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  17. ^ "Second Republican state senator chooses to support marriage equality". Seattletimes.com. 10 January 2012. Retrieved 21 November 2017.
  18. ^ "'Pflug' becomes Republican profanity after endorsing Democrat, criticizing Dino Rossi - Issaquah-Sammamish Reporter". Issaquahreporter.com. 10 July 2012. Retrieved 21 November 2017.
  19. ^ "Gay marriage creates choices, costs for Minn. GOP". Denverpost.com. 14 February 2013. Retrieved 21 November 2017.
  20. ^ "Tuesday Jolt: Pflug Burns Rossi, Supremes Burn Cheap Smokes". Seattlemet.com. Retrieved 21 November 2017.
  21. ^ "Sunday Spin: GOP intrigue in the 5th Lege District". Spokesman.com. Retrieved 21 November 2017.
  22. ^ "Dino Rossi appointed to be state senator again - Political Buzz". Blog.thenewstribune.com. Archived from the original on 12 July 2012. Retrieved 21 November 2017.
  23. ^ a b "First campaign ad for same-sex marriage". Mynorthwest.com. 29 July 2012. Retrieved 21 November 2017.