Dana LeVangie

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Dana LeVangie
Boston Red Sox – No. 60
Pitching coach
Born: (1969-08-11) August 11, 1969 (age 50)
Whitman, Massachusetts
Bats: Right Throws: Right
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Dana Alan LeVangie (born August 11, 1969) is an American professional baseball coach, currently the pitching coach for the Boston Red Sox of Major League Baseball (MLB). Formerly a scout and minor league catcher, as an active player he both batted and threw right-handed and was listed at 5 feet 10 inches (1.78 m) and 185 pounds (84 kg).

Early years[edit]

A native of Whitman, Massachusetts, LeVangie graduated from Whitman-Hanson Regional High School in 1987; he then attended Cape Cod Community College in West Barnstable, Massachusetts (1987–1989), and American International College (AIC) in Springfield, Massachusetts (1989–1991).[1] He was a catcher on the AIC Yellow Jackets baseball team for two seasons (1990–1991). As a senior, he batted .473 with 13 home runs and 87 RBIs,[a] and was named 1991 Division II Northeast Player of the Year.[1] He was selected by the Red Sox in the 14th round of the 1991 MLB draft.

Playing career[edit]

LeVangie signed with the Red Sox in June 1991,[2] and played in the Boston farm system through 1996. He mostly played at the Class A-Advanced and Double-A levels, along with eight games in Triple-A. He was a career .196 hitter with seven home runs and 78 RBIs in 351 games played. LeVangie participated in spring training replacement games in 1995,[3] during the 1994–95 MLB strike.[4]

Post-playing career[edit]

LeVangie became the bullpen catcher for the 1997 Red Sox, and served in that role for eight years, through the 2004 Red Sox championship season. He then worked as a scout for the Red Sox for eight seasons,[5] serving as a pro scout in 2005 and an advance scout from 2006 through 2012.[1]

In 2013, LeVangie was named to succeed Gary Tuck as bullpen coach for the Red Sox. He held that role until mid-August 2015, when he became interim bench coach for the Red Sox, one of several coaching reassignments caused by manager John Farrell's medical leave of absence for the successful treatment of lymphoma. LeVangie returned to his role as the Red Sox' bullpen coach for the 2016 and 2017 seasons.

LeVangie was named to succeed Carl Willis as Boston pitching coach on November 8, 2017, by new manager Alex Cora.[5] The first non-pitcher to hold that role for the Red Sox since Mike Roarke in 1994,[1] LeVangie received credit for his contributions to Boston's 108-win 2018 regular season, its American League pennant, and World Series championship.[6] The Red Sox finished third in their league in team earned run average (3.75),[7] then won 11 of 14 post-season games to capture their ninth world title.

Personal life[edit]

LeVangie was inducted to the AIC Yellow Jackets Hall of Fame in 2006.[8] As of November 2017, LeVangie lives in East Bridgewater, Massachusetts, with his wife and two children.[9]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ AIC HOF page cites .462, 13 HR, 75 RBIs

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "Red Sox Roster & Staff – Dana LeVangie #60". MLB.com. Retrieved June 14, 2018.
  2. ^ "Deals". The Town Talk. Alexandria, Louisiana. June 7, 1991. p. 10. Retrieved June 14, 2018 – via newspapers.com.
  3. ^ "Replacement Twin baffles Sox". The Burlington Free Press. Burlington, Vermont. March 15, 1995. p. 23. Retrieved June 14, 2018 – via newspapers.com.
  4. ^ Doyle, Paul (March 19, 1997). "Saberhagen has a lot to offer". Hartford Courant. Hartford, Connecticut. p. C7. Retrieved June 14, 2018 – via newspapers.com.
  5. ^ a b Browne, Ian (November 8, 2017). "Red Sox hire three to join MLB coaching staff". MLB.com.
  6. ^ Speier, Alex (9 March 2019), "Dana LeVangie is 'Heart and Soul' of Red Sox Pitching Staff." The Boston Globe
  7. ^ Retrosheet
  8. ^ "Dana LeVangie - Class of 1994 - Hall of Fame". aicyellowjackets.com. Retrieved June 14, 2018.
  9. ^ Pelletier, Joe (November 9, 2017). "Dana LeVangie named Red Sox pitching coach". enterprisenews.com. Retrieved June 14, 2018.

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]

Sporting positions
Preceded by
Gary Tuck
Boston Red Sox bullpen coach
2013–2017
Succeeded by
Craig Bjornson
Preceded by
Carl Willis
Boston Red Sox pitching coach
2018–present
Succeeded by
Incumbent