East Acton tube station

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East Acton London Underground
East Acton Tube Station.jpg
East Acton is located in Greater London
East Acton
East Acton
Location of East Acton in Greater London
LocationEast Acton
Local authorityHammersmith & Fulham
Managed byLondon Underground
Number of platforms2
Fare zone2
London Underground annual entry and exit
2013Increase 3.88 million[1]
2014Increase 4.02 million[1]
2015Decrease 4.01 million[1]
2016Increase 4.12 million[1]
2017Decrease 4.08 million[1]
Railway companies
Original companyGreat Western Railway
Pre-groupingGreat Western Railway
Post-groupingGreat Western Railway
Key dates
3 August 1920Station opened
Other information
External links
WGS8451°31′01″N 0°14′51″W / 51.51694°N 0.24750°W / 51.51694; -0.24750Coordinates: 51°31′01″N 0°14′51″W / 51.51694°N 0.24750°W / 51.51694; -0.24750
Underground sign at Westminster.jpg London transport portal

East Acton is a London Underground station in East Acton in west London. The station is on the Central line, between White City and North Acton stations, and in Travelcard Zone 2. It is close to Wormwood Scrubs prison and Queen Charlotte's and Chelsea Hospital.

Location[edit]

The station is located on Erconwald Street and is near the A40 Western Avenue connected via Old Oak Common Lane. It is also just outside the London Borough of Ealing and is instead in the London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham. Though the name suggests, East Acton is not near the East Acton neighbourhood. The station, however, is near St Aidan of Lindisfarne RC Church and Wormwood Scrubs. Queen Charlotte's and Chelsea Hospital, Hammersmith Hospital, HM Prison and Imperial College Hammersmith branch are accessible from the station.[2]

History[edit]

Looking east, with the eastbound platform shelter on the left.
Down Milk empties passing East Acton on the GWR lines in 1949.

In 1905, the Great Western Railway (GWR) proposal to construct the Ealing & Shepherd's Bush Railway (E&SBR) so that it would connect to its main line route at Ealing Broadway to the West London Railway (WLR) north of Shepherd's Bush was approved by Parliament.[note 1] Construction had not started and in 1911, the Central London Railway (CLR, now part of the Central line) and GWR agreed running powers for CLR services to continue from Shepherd's Bush to Ealing Broadway using the GWR route. The CLR request for a short extension from Wood Lane to connect to the E&SBR tracks gained parliamentary approval on 18 August 1911 under the Central London Railway Act, 1911.[4][5] The GWR constructed the new E&SBR line.[note 2] Electrification of the track did not begin after the end of the First World War. When complete, CLR services started on 3 August 1920 where East Acton was opened as the only intermediate station.[6][7][8]

Since the CLR was exclusively a passenger service, two extra dedicated tracks for the GWR's freight trains were opened in 1938, but were closed in 1964.[9] The trackbed of these rails is now overgrown, with vegetation visible immediately to the north of the station.

Improvements and closures[edit]

The tracks at East Acton were replaced in 2005 which saw a partial closure of the line from West Ruislip or Ealing Broadway to White City between 13 and 14 August 2005.[10] In 2007, the station was refurbished by Metronet.[11]

Services and connections[edit]

Looking west. The vegetation marks the alignment of the ex-GWR tracks, lifted many years ago

Services[edit]

East Acton is served by the Central line between North Acton and White City.[12] To the east, the two tracks change direction to continue to White City.[13][14]

The typical off-peak service in trains per hour (tph) is:[14]

Night Tube services also serve the station, with a frequency of 3 tph in both directions.[15]

Connections[edit]

London Buses routes 7, 70, 72, 95, 228, 260, 272 and 283, and Night Bus route N7 serve the station.[16]

Notes and references[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ According to Transport for London (TfL), the Central London Railway abandoned its policy of through services not sharing tracks with any other railway from this proposal.[3]
  2. ^ The line opened as a steam-hauled freight only line on 16 April 1917.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "Multi-year station entry-and-exit figures" (XLSX). London Underground station passenger usage data. Transport for London. January 2018. Retrieved 22 July 2018.
  2. ^ East Acton - Google Maps (Map). Retrieved 23 November 2018.
  3. ^ "Central line facts". Transport for London. Archived from the original on 2 December 2010. Retrieved 7 November 2018.
  4. ^ Bruce & Croome 2006, p. 25.
  5. ^ "No. 28524". The London Gazette. 22 August 1911. pp. 6216–6217.
  6. ^ Bruce & Croome 2006, p. 26.
  7. ^ Rose 1999.
  8. ^ Day & Reed 2008, p. 124.
  9. ^ Jackson, Alan A (1999). London's Local Railways. Capital Transport. ISBN 1-85414-209-7.
  10. ^ "Buses Replace Trains as Track Replacement Works Take Place at East Acton" (Press release). Transport for London. 4 August 2005. Archived from the original on 23 November 2018. Retrieved 23 November 2018.
  11. ^ "Station Refurbishment Summary" (PDF). London Underground Railway Society. July 2007. p. 5. Archived (PDF) from the original on 10 May 2015. Retrieved 23 November 2018.
  12. ^ Standard Tube Map (PDF) (Map). Not to scale. Transport for London. May 2019. Archived (PDF) from the original on 1 June 2019.
  13. ^ "Central line". Railfanning London's Railways. 25 March 2018. Archived from the original on 23 November 2018. Retrieved 23 November 2018.
  14. ^ a b Clive, Feather (24 September 2018). "Central line". Clive's Underground Line Guides. Archived from the original on 23 November 2018. Retrieved 23 November 2018.
  15. ^ Transport for London (January 2019). Standard Night Tube Map (PDF) (Map). Not to scale. Transport for London. Archived (PDF) from the original on 11 March 2019.
  16. ^ "Buses from East Acton" (PDF). Transport for London. June 2016. Archived (PDF) from the original on 23 November 2018. Retrieved 23 November 2018.

Bibliography[edit]

  • Bruce, J Graeme; Croome, Desmond F (2006) [1996]. The Central Line. Capital Transport. ISBN 1-85414-297-6.
  • Rose, Douglas (1999) [1980]. The London Underground, A Diagrammatic History. Douglas Rose/Capital Transport. ISBN 1-85414-219-4.
  • Day, John R; Reed, John (2008) [1963]. The Story of London's Underground. Capital Transport. ISBN 978-1-85414-316-7.
Preceding station   Underground no-text.svg London Underground   Following station
Central line
towards Epping, Hainault
or Woodford (via Hainault)
  Former route  
Preceding station   Underground no-text.svg London Underground   Following station
Terminus
Central line
(1920-1923)
Central line
(1923-1946)
Central line
(1946-1947)
towards Stratford
Central line
(1947-1947)
towards Leytonstone
Central line
(1947-1947)
Service arrangement if Old Oak Common station is constructed
Preceding station   Underground no-text.svg London Underground   Following station
Central line
towards Epping, Hainault
or Woodford (via Hainault)