Elmhurst Avenue (IND Queens Boulevard Line)

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 Elmhurst Avenue
 "M" train"R" train
MTA NYC logo.svg New York City Subway station (rapid transit)
Elmhurst Avenue - Manhattan bound platform.jpg
Manhattan bound platform with mosaic.
Station statistics
AddressElmhurst Avenue, 45th Avenue, & Broadway
Elmhurst, NY 11373
BoroughQueens
LocaleElmhurst
Coordinates40°44′30″N 73°52′52″W / 40.741795°N 73.88104°W / 40.741795; -73.88104Coordinates: 40°44′30″N 73°52′52″W / 40.741795°N 73.88104°W / 40.741795; -73.88104
DivisionB (IND)
LineIND Queens Boulevard Line
Services      E late nights (late nights)
      M weekdays until 11 p.m. (weekdays until 11 p.m.)
      R all hours except late nights (all hours except late nights)
Transit connectionsBus transport MTA Bus: Q53 SBS
StructureUnderground
Platforms2 side platforms
Tracks4
Other information
OpenedDecember 31, 1936; 82 years ago (1936-12-31)
Station code266[1]
Wireless serviceWi-Fi and cellular service is provided at this station[2][3]
Traffic
Passengers (2017)4,039,686[4]Decrease 5.4%
Rank128 out of 425
Station succession
Next eastGrand Avenue–Newtown: E late nightsM weekdays until 11 p.m.R all hours except late nights
Next westJackson Heights–Roosevelt Avenue: E late nightsM weekdays until 11 p.m.R all hours except late nights

Elmhurst Avenue Subway Station (IND)
MPSNew York City Subway System MPS
NRHP reference #05000672[5]
Added to NRHPJuly 6, 2005

Elmhurst Avenue is a local station on the IND Queens Boulevard Line of the New York City Subway. Located at the intersection of Elmhurst Avenue, 45th Avenue, and Broadway in Elmhurst, Queens, it is served by the M train on weekdays, the R train at all times except nights, and the E train at night.

History[edit]

Track layout

The Queens Boulevard Line was one of the first lines built by the city-owned Independent Subway System (IND),[6][7][8] and stretches between the IND Eighth Avenue Line in Manhattan and 179th Street and Hillside Avenue in Jamaica, Queens.[6][8][9] The Queens Boulevard Line was in part financed by a Public Works Administration (PWA) loan and grant of $25,000,000.[10] On December 31, 1936, the IND Queens Boulevard Line was extended by eight stops, and 3.5 miles (5.6 km), from its previous terminus at Roosevelt Avenue to Union Turnpike, and the Elmhurst Avenue station opened as part of this extension.[11][12][13][14][15][16]

Station layout[edit]

G Street level Exit/entrance
M Mezzanine Fare control, station agent, MetroCard machines
P
Platform level
Side platform, doors will open on the right
Southbound local "M" train toward Middle Village–Metropolitan Avenue weekdays (Jackson Heights–Roosevelt Avenue)
"R" train toward Bay Ridge–95th Street (Jackson Heights–Roosevelt Avenue)
"E" train toward World Trade Center nights (Jackson Heights–Roosevelt Avenue)
Southbound express "E" train "F" train do not stop here
Northbound express "E" train "F" train do not stop here →
Northbound local "R" train ("M" train weekdays) toward Forest Hills–71st Avenue (Grand Avenue–Newtown)
"E" train toward Jamaica Center–Parsons/Archer nights (Grand Avenue–Newtown)
Side platform, doors will open on the right
Southwestern (railroad north) entrance stair

This underground station has four tracks and two side platforms. The two center express tracks are used by the E train during daytime hours and the F train at all times. Both platforms have a teal trim line on a black border with small "ELMHURST" signs in white lettering on a black background beneath them. They also have name tablets reading "ELMHURST AVE." in white sans serif lettering on a black background and teal border. Yellow i-beam columns run along both platforms at regular intervals with alternating ones having the standard black name plates in white lettering.

This station has a full-length mezzanine above the platforms and tracks supported by yellow i-beam columns. It is separated into three sections by two chain-link fences. However, underneath the westernmost staircase of the station, there is a passageway that connects the mezzanines from each direction, allowing free transfers between directions. Each platform has seven staircases going up to the mezzanine. The token booth is at the center in the middle section outside fare control with a small turnstile bank to either outer section.

This station was listed on the National Register of Historic Places on July 6, 2005, as structure number 05000672.[17][18]

Exits[edit]

The staircases to the street are at either end of the mezzanine. On the northwest (railroad south) side, one staircase goes up to the southwest corner of 82nd Street and Broadway while another goes up to the southwest corner of Britton Avenue and Broadway. At this end, there are two exit-only turnstiles from the Forest Hills-bound side of the mezzanine and two High Entry-Exit Turnstiles from the Manhattan-bound side. On the southeast (railroad north) side of the mezzanine, there are two staircases going up to either southern corners of 45th Avenue and Broadway and another going up to the northwest corner that is built within a store front and goes through a small underground shopping arcade. On this side, there are two exit-only turnstiles and one High Entry-Exit Turnstile from the Forest Hills-bound side and two High Entry-Exit Turnstiles from the Manhattan-bound side.[19]

Nearby infrastructure[edit]

The Elmhurst station on the Long Island Rail Road's Port Washington Branch was about one block to the south of this station before it closed in 1985. A closed passageway exists between the two stations.[20]

Between this station and Jackson Heights–Roosevelt Avenue, there are holes on the tunnel's ceiling which are the never-used tunnels coming from the Roosevelt Avenue Terminal station.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Station Developers' Information". Metropolitan Transportation Authority. Retrieved June 13, 2017.
  2. ^ "NYC Subway Wireless – Active Stations". Transit Wireless Wifi. Retrieved May 18, 2016.
  3. ^ More Subway Stations in Manhattan, Bronx in Line to Get Online, mta.info (March 25, 2015). "The first two phases included stations in Midtown Manhattan and all underground stations in Queens with the exception of the 7 Main St terminal."
  4. ^ "Facts and Figures: Annual Subway Ridership 2012–2017". Metropolitan Transportation Authority. July 12, 2018. Retrieved July 12, 2018.
  5. ^ "NPS Focus". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. Retrieved December 9, 2011.
  6. ^ a b Duffus, R.L. (September 22, 1929). "OUR GREAT SUBWAY NETWORK SPREADS WIDER; New Plans of Board of Transportation Involve the Building of More Than One Hundred Miles of Additional Rapid Transit Routes for New York". The New York Times. Retrieved August 19, 2015.
  7. ^ "QUEENS SUBWAY WORK AHEAD OF SCHEDULE: Completion Will Lead to Big Apartrnent Building, Says William C. Speers". The New York Times. April 7, 1929. Retrieved September 1, 2015.
  8. ^ a b "Queens Lauded as Best Boro By Chamber Chief". Brooklyn Daily Eagle. September 23, 1929. p. 40. Retrieved October 4, 2015 – via Newspapers.com.
  9. ^ The New York Times, New Subway Routes in Hylan Program to Cost $186,046,000, March 21, 1925, page 1
  10. ^ "TEST TRAINS RUNNING IN QUEENS SUBWAY; Switch and Signal Equipment of New Independent Line Is Being Checked". The New York Times. December 20, 1936. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved April 26, 2016.
  11. ^ "NEW RETAIL AREA IN QUEENS BOROUGH; Sees Roosevelt Avenue Subway Station as Great Shopping Centre. ADVANTAGES POINTED OUT Accessibility to Many Home Communities Assures Potential Market". The New York Times. July 9, 1933. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved April 26, 2016.
  12. ^ "Reproduction Poster of Extension to Union Turnpike – Kew Gardens". Flickr – Photo Sharing!. Retrieved April 26, 2016.
  13. ^ Roger P. Roess; Gene Sansone (August 23, 2012). The Wheels That Drove New York: A History of the New York City Transit System. Springer Science & Business Media. pp. 416–417. ISBN 978-3-642-30484-2.
  14. ^ "PWA Party Views New Subway Link: Queens Section to Be Opened Tomorrow Is Inspected by Tuttle and Others" (PDF). The New York Times. December 30, 1936. Retrieved June 27, 2015.
  15. ^ "CITY SUBWAY OPENS QUEENS LINK TODAY; Extension Brings Kew Gardens Within 36 Minutes of 42d St. on Frequent Trains". The New York Times. December 31, 1936. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved April 26, 2016.
  16. ^ "OPENING MOVED UP FOR NEW SUBWAY; Traffic to Be Started on the Extension of City's Line to Kew Gardens on Thursday. EIGHT STATIONS ARE ADDED La Guardia and Official Party Will Inspect New Queens Branch on Wednesday". The New York Times. December 26, 1936. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved April 26, 2016.
  17. ^ Queens County Listings at the National Register of Historic Places (Structure #05000672)
  18. ^ National Register of Historic Places Listings March 25, 2005 (Structure #05000672)
  19. ^ "Map of NYC Subway Entrances". NYC Open Data. City of New York. Retrieved July 10, 2018.
  20. ^ "LIRR Station History". TrainsAreFun.com. Archived from the original on January 6, 2011. Retrieved June 22, 2013.

External links[edit]