Emma Dean (chef)

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Emma Dean
Emma Dean in her kitchen, 2017.jpg
Emma Dean in her kitchen, 2017
Born (1977-10-16) 16 October 1977 (age 42)
ResidenceMelbourne, Victoria
NationalityAustralian
EducationMonash University and RMIT University
OccupationCook, television presenter
Years active2013 – present
Known forTelevision chef
PredecessorAndy Allen
SuccessorBrent Owens
RelativesRachel Dean (sister)
AwardsWinner, MasterChef Australia
Websitehttp://www.emmadean.com.au

Emma Dean (born 16 October 1977) is an Australian chef and television presenter, who came to prominence as the winner of the fifth series of MasterChef Australia.[1]

Personal life[edit]

Dean spent her childhood on a small farm in Epsom, Victoria. Her elder sister is clothing designer Rachel Dean.[2]

Dean studied at Monash University and RMIT, completing a master's degree in environment and planning, and worked in town planning for over eight years in the Victorian State Government.[3]

Dean also trained in track cycling at the Australian Institute of Sport in Canberra as part of a talent identification search. She is Metropolitan Champion in the 500m Time Trail and represented Australia at the 2004 Oceania Track Cycling Championships.[4]

MasterChef[edit]

On 1 September 2013, Dean became the series 5 winner of MasterChef Australia. In the final round, Dean faced off against Lynton Tapp in a dessert pressure test, which saw them recreating Attica chef Ben Shewry’s complicated Plight of the Bees.[5]

Dean's prize was $100,000, work experience in some of the country's best kitchens, and an Alfa Romeo car.[5] As part of the MasterChef prize, Dean received a book publishing deal with New Holland Publishers.[6] Her cookbook A Homegrown Table was released on 1 December 2013.[7]

My Market Kitchen[edit]

Dean was the host of My Market Kitchen, a national television show based at the Queen Victoria Market in Melbourne.[8] Her co-presenter was Lynton Tapp with whom she formed a strong friendship[9] during their time together on MasterChef Australia. In 2019, they got replaced by season eight winner Elena Duggan and season ten finalist Khanh Ong.

References[edit]

  1. ^ The Telegraph, The Daily Telegraph, 1 September 2013
  2. ^ Dean, Emma. A Homegrown Table: Food to Eat with Family and Friends. New Holland Publishers, 2013
  3. ^ MasterChef Australia, MasterChef Australia contestant profile
  4. ^ Track Cycling News, Former Track Cyclist Wins MasterChef, 13 September 2013
  5. ^ a b Popsugar Emma Dean Is the Winner of MasterChef 2013!, 1 September 2013
  6. ^ MasterChef Australia, Emma wins MasterChef Australia 2013
  7. ^ https://www.amazon.com/home-grown-table-Food-friends-family/dp/1742574718
  8. ^ "Queen Victoria Market – The Home for a New National TV Show". qvm.com.au. 27 May 2016. Retrieved 6 August 2016.
  9. ^ "Masterchef finalist supports ICC". inspiringchangechallenge.com. 18 June 2014. Retrieved 6 August 2016.

External links[edit]