For our Future's Sake

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For our Future's Sake
For our Future’s Sake logo.png
AbbreviationFFS
TypeCampaign group
PurposeYouth and student-led campaign calling for a public vote on Brexit.
Location
Key people
Amanda Chetwynd-Cowieson

Richard Brooks

Jason Arthur
Websiteffsakes.uk
Part of a series of articles on
Brexit
(withdrawal of the United Kingdom from the European Union)
UK location in the EU 2016.svg
Flag of the United Kingdom.svg United Kingdom portal
Flag of Europe.svg European Union portal

For our Future's Sake (FFS) is a student-led pressure group supporting a referendum on the Brexit withdrawal agreement. It represents at least 60 Students’ Unions, and 980,000 students, across the UK.[1]

Background[edit]

FFS was launched at the National Union of Students' National Conference in 2018. Incumbent Deputy President Amatey Doku called for 'nationwide student-led mobilization to demand a people's vote' during his re-election speech, and delegates passed policy to 'campaign for a second referendum on the deal negotiated'.[2][3]

In May 2018, the campaign launched its statement of intent in an open letter undersigned by 120 student leaders.[1] The letter was featured in several British newspapers, and FFS spokespeople pledged a 'summer of action' involving demonstrations across the UK.

The campaign's style has been described as 'irreverent' and 'provocative', attracting a broad youth appeal through memes, videos and profanity.[4][5]

Activities[edit]

The organisation has held a number of direct-action demonstrations, including stunts at the Labour Live festival, outside Boris Johnson's residence, and at Parliament.[6][7] The group also held numerous rallies and demonstrations across the UK during its 'summer of action', attracting over 160,000 attendees; this culminated with a march at Labour's National Conference. It gained endorsements from Dragons' Den star Deborah Meaden and YouTuber Dodie Clark, as well as several MPs. Members of the campaign have been featured on leading news networks, and in national print media and online.

FFS also works closely with Our Future Our Choice (OFOC), another young person's pro-EU advocacy group, collaborating on events like the number of "Parliament Takeovers" where a large group of young people visit Parliament's central lobby and meet with their local MPs.[8]

The primary impact of the group is on the People's Vote campaign itself. Journalist Matthew D'Ancona described the influence of FFS as 'transformative', arguing that 'the public face of People’s Vote changed fundamentally as the new network fizzed and buzzed and did its work. A campaign that had started life looking like the liberal elite demanding its job back morphed into a grassroots uprising of the young against their elders.'[9]

Membership[edit]

FFS supporters include sabbatical officers in 2018 from Students' Unions in Birmingham, Cambridge, Leeds, and Liverpool, as well as across Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland.[10]

Higher Education members[edit]

See List of Higher Education students' unions in the United Kingdom

Scotland[edit]

England[edit]

Wales[edit]

Northern Ireland[edit]

Further Education members[edit]

  • Ayrshire College Students' Union
  • Bath College Students' Union
  • Chichester College
  • City of Liverpool College Students' Union
  • Coleg Cambria
  • Derby College
  • Dudley College
  • Exeter College
  • Furness College
  • Grŵp Llandrillo Menai
  • Havant and South Downs College
  • Newcastle Under Lyme College Students' Union

National affiliates[edit]

  • National Union of Students
  • Labour Students
  • Young Greens[13]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Farand, Chloe (13 May 2018). "Student groups with a million members back call for second Brexit referendum". The Independent. Retrieved 13 September 2018.
  2. ^ Pontone, Maya (30 March 2018). "Vice President of NUS mobilises 'people's vote' on final Brexit deal". shoutoutuk.org. Shout Out UK. Retrieved 13 September 2018.
  3. ^ Ramiro, Joana (28 March 2018). "NUS throws weight behind Brexit second ref". Left Foot Forward. Retrieved 13 September 2018.
  4. ^ Helm, Toby; Boycott-Owen, Mason (12 May 2018). "Students plan summer of defiance in push for 'people's vote' on Brexit". The Observer. Retrieved 13 September 2018.
  5. ^ Stewart, Heather; Elgot, Jessica (11 September 2018). "Activists to use Labour conference to push for second Brexit vote". The Guardian. Retrieved 13 September 2018.
  6. ^ Simons, Ned (16 May 2018). "Anti-Brexit protesters try to disrupt Jeremy Corbyn's speech to 'Labour Live' festival". HuffPost. Retrieved 13 September 2018.
  7. ^ Buchan, Lizzy (26 July 2018). "Anti-Brexit protesters offer to help Boris Johnson move out of 'grace-and-favour lad pad' after cabinet resignation". The Independent. Retrieved 13 September 2018.
  8. ^ Curiel, Joshua (1 January 2019). "Here's how we can give Britain a Final Say on Brexit". The Independent.
  9. ^ https://members.tortoisemedia.com/2019/03/16/peoples-vote-machine/content.html
  10. ^ Helm, Toby (12 May 2018). "One million students join calls for vote on Brexit deal". The Observer. Retrieved 13 September 2018.
  11. ^ "Leeds University Union - Your Student Exec Support the People's Vote March for the Future". www.luu.org.uk. 12 October 2018.
  12. ^ "Leeds University Union - Your Student Exec support a People's Vote". www.luu.org.uk. 11 December 2018.
  13. ^ FFS (16 May 2018). "Open Letter to Parliament — Students want a people's vote on Brexit". vip.politicsmeanspolitics.com. Politics Means Politics. Retrieved 13 September 2018.