Force (comics)

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Force
IronMan-224.jpg
Force (left center, below Iron Man) as featured on the cover of Iron Man #224 (Nov. 1987). Art by Bob Layton.
Publication information
PublisherMarvel Comics
First appearancePrince Namor, the Savage Sub-Mariner #67 (Nov. 1972)
Created bySteve Gerber and Don Heck
In-story information
Alter egoClayton Wilson
Notable aliasesTaylor, Carl Walker
AbilitiesVia suit:
Enhanced strength
Force field projection
Flight

Force (born Clayton "Clay" Wilson, legally changed to Carl Walker) is a fictional character appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics. The character first appears in Prince Namor, the Savage Sub-Mariner #67 (Nov. 1972) and was created by Steve Gerber and Don Heck.

Fictional character biography[edit]

Clayton Wilson is a graduate student at Empire State University working as a research assistant to scientist Dr. Damon Walters, who develops a prototype device for creating a protective force field. Wilson steals the prototype force field generator, creates a battle-suit that incorporates it, and adopts the alias "Force". The character then goes on a rampage through New York City until he was defeated by hero Namor the Sub-Mariner.[1]

Force retreats and appears in the title Iron Man, having become a professional criminal, working for crime boss Justin Hammer in exchange for modifications to his suit. Force and a group of mercenaries hijack the yacht of industrialist Tony Stark (the alter ego of Iron Man) and take several hostages. Iron Man, however, tracks the yacht, defeats Force and his men and rescues the hostages.[2]

Wilson eventually reappears in the title Iron Man, and decides to reform. Hammer, however, traps the character in the suit and threatens to kill him if he reneges on the agreement. Force flees and Hammer sends villains the Beetle, Blacklash, and the Blizzard II to kill him. Iron Man aids Force in stopping the villains, then lies to the authorities and advises that Wilson was killed in battle to placate Hammer. Wilson is provided with a new identity and employment with Barstow Electronics, a subsidiary of Stark Industries.[3] Analysis of Force's armor reveals that elements of it were actually based on Stark's own designs, Stark bringing in Wilson to quickly ask him where he acquired that technology, thus setting in motion the events of the Armor Wars when he learns that Justin Hammer acquired some of Stark's plans thanks to a raid carried out by Spymaster.[4] Wilson makes another brief appearance in the title Iron Man, impersonating the hero to assist Stark.[5]

The character makes another appearance in Iron Man as part of the group the "Iron Legion", subsequently battling the giant robot Ultimo.[6] Force then appears in the third volume of Iron Man, and after being blackmailed travels to the country Iraq to aid Stark once again.[7]

Wilson reappears as Force during the Dark Reign storyline, arresting several villains employed by the criminal the Hood.[8]

Powers, abilities, and equipment[edit]

Clayton Wilson designed and used a powered battle-suit incorporating the force field projector designed by Dr. Damon Walters. The suit also provides enhanced strength, flight and can generate an electric current that can be channelled through the force field when activated. The character is a graduate student in physics.

In other media[edit]

Television[edit]

  • Force appears in the Iron Man: Armored Adventures episode "Armor Wars". This version is a member of Obadiah Stane's Guardsmen and was a former Maggia operative. His armor is a recolored version of Stark's Space Armor Design.
  • A version of Clay Wilson appears in The Punisher played by Tim Guinee. He cares for his son Lewis (played by Daniel Webber), a discharged Army veteran who suffers from PTSD. Clay attempts to comfort his son after he nearly shoots him, but Lewis pushes him away. Clay later tells Curtis Hoyle about what happened.[9] In the episode "Crosshairs," he attempts to connect with his son and talk him into changing and moving on with his life, unaware of the fact that his son just killed O'Connor. He even shows him footage of the boxing match between George Foreman and Muhammad Ali in an attempt to connect with him.[10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Prince Namor, the Sub-Mariner #67 - 68 (Nov. - Jan. 1972 - 1973)
  2. ^ Iron Man #140 - 141 (Nov. - Dec. 1980)
  3. ^ Iron Man #223 - 224 (Oct. - Nov. 1987)
  4. ^ Iron Man #225 (Jan. 1988)
  5. ^ Iron Man #244 (Jul. 1989)
  6. ^ Iron Man #300 (Jan. 1994)
  7. ^ Iron Man vol. 3, #79 (June 2004); #81 - 82 (both July 2004)
  8. ^ Dark Reign: The Hood #1-3 (July - Sep. 2009)
  9. ^ Goddard, Andy (director); Steve Lightfoot (writer) (November 17, 2017). "Kandahar". Marvel's The Punisher. Season 1. Episode 3. Netflix.
  10. ^ Goddard, Andy (director); Bruce Marshall Romans (writer) (November 17, 2017). "Crosshairs". Marvel's The Punisher. Season 1. Episode 7. Netflix.

External links[edit]

  • Force at the Marvel Universe wiki