George Landenberger

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George Bertram Landenberger
George Landenberger 1932.jpg
Landenberger as governor in 1932
23rd Governor of American Samoa
In office
May 12, 1932 – April 10, 1934
Preceded byGatewood Lincoln
Succeeded byThomas Latimore
Personal details
BornMay 12, 1879
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Died15 January 1936(1936-01-15) (aged 56)
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Alma materUnited States Naval Academy
OccupationNaval officer
AwardsNavy Cross
Military service
Allegiance United States
Branch/serviceUnited States Navy Seal United States Navy
RankUS-O6 insignia.svg Captain
CommandsUSS Indiana
USS Pennsylvania
USS Arkansas
15th Naval District
Philadelphia Naval Shipyard
Destroyer squad of the Asiatic Fleet

George Bertram Landenberger (May 12, 1879 – January 15, 1936) was a United States Navy Captain and the 23rd (and 21st unique) Governor of American Samoa, from May 12, 1932 to April 10, 1934. Landenberger commanded many ships during his naval career, as well as two naval yards. He received the Navy Cross for his actions commanding USS Indiana during World War I. He died of cancer in 1936, one year after retiring from military service.

Life[edit]

Early life[edit]

Landenberger was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on May 12, 1879.[1]

Naval career[edit]

Landenberger attended the United States Naval Academy from Germantown, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on May 10, 1896, graduating in 1900.[2] As an ensign, he joined the United States Asiatic Fleet, eventually joining forces in the Philippines.[3] Landenberger served on USS Alabama during 1906.[4] In 1915, he served as a lieutenant commander on USS Louisiana.[5]

Landenberger received the Navy Cross for his service as commanding officer of USS Indiana during the First World War. The citation read: "The Navy Cross is awarded to Captain George Landenberger, U.S. Navy, for exceptionally meritorious service in a duty of great responsibility as commanding officer of the U.S.S. Indiana, in the Atlantic Fleet." After Indiana, Landenberger commanded two other ships, USS Pennsylvania in 1930 and USS Arkansas in 1932, as well as the entire destroyer squadron of the Asiatic Fleet from 1924 to 1926.[3]

Right before becoming the governor of American Samoa, Landenberger was in the post of Chief of Staff of the 15th Naval District in the Panama Canal Zone.[6] This followed an appointment to the command of the Naval Station on Goat Island.[3] After serving as governor, he was reassigned as head of the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard.[3]

Later life[edit]

Landenberger retired from service in 1935 to Haverford, Pennsylvania. December 10 of that year, Landenberger underwent treatment for lung problems, receiving several blood transfusions.[3] He died on January 15, 1936 of sarcoma of the chest. He died at the Naval Hospital in Philadelphia.[1]

Governorship[edit]

Landenberger became Governor of American Samoa on May 12, 1932, succeeding Gatewood Lincoln.[7] He served until April 10, 1934.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Sorensen, Stan; Joseph Theroux (2007). "The Samoan Historical Calendar, 1606-2007" (PDF). Government of American Samoa. pp. 16, 56, 84. Archived from the original (PDF) on 25 March 2009. Retrieved 22 February 2010.
  2. ^ "The Lucky Bag of the United States Naval Academy". 5. 1898: 41. Retrieved 22 February 2010. Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  3. ^ a b c d e "G. B. Landenberger, Navy Captain, Dies: Retired Officer Served for 35—Held Many Important Posts During Career". The New York Times. The New York Times Company. 16 January 1936. p. 21.
  4. ^ Bureau of Naval Personnel (1906). Register of The Commissioned and Warrant Officers Of The United States Navy and Marine Corps and Reserve Officers on Active Duty. Washington, D.C.: United States Government Printing Office. p. 34. Retrieved 22 February 2010.
  5. ^ Bureau of Naval Personnel (1915). Register of The Commissioned and Warrant Officers Of The United States Navy and Marine Corps and Reserve Officers on Active Duty. Washington, D.C.: United States Government Printing Office. p. 267. Retrieved 22 February 2010.
  6. ^ Associated Press (6 May 1932). "Named Governor of American Samoa". The New York Times. The New York Times Company. p. 19.
  7. ^ Sorensen, Stan (16 May 2008). "Historical Notes" (PDF). Tapuitea. Government of American Samoa. III (20): 2. Archived from the original (PDF) on 27 November 2008. Retrieved 22 February 2010.
  8. ^ Sorensen, Stan (11 April 2008). "Historical Notes" (PDF). Tapuitea. Government of American Samoa. III (15): 2. Archived from the original (PDF) on 27 May 2010. Retrieved 22 February 2010.