Glenni William Scofield

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Glenni William Scofield
Glenni William Scofield - Brady-Handy.jpg
Judge of the Court of Claims
In office
May 20, 1881 – July 29, 1891
Appointed byJames A. Garfield
Preceded byWilliam H. Hunt
Succeeded byStanton J. Peelle
Register of the Treasury
In office
April 1, 1878 – May 20, 1881
Appointed byRutherford B. Hayes
Preceded byJohn Allison
Succeeded byBlanche Bruce
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Pennsylvania's at-large district
In office
March 4, 1873 – March 3, 1875
Preceded byDistrict established
Succeeded byDistrict abolished
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Pennsylvania's 19th district
In office
March 4, 1863 – March 3, 1873
Preceded byJohn Covode
Succeeded byCarlton Brandaga Curtis
Personal details
Born
Glenni William Scofield

(1817-03-11)March 11, 1817
Dewittville, New York
DiedAugust 30, 1891(1891-08-30) (aged 74)
Warren, Pennsylvania
Resting placeOakland Cemetery
Warren, Pennsylvania
Political partyDemocratic (until 1856)
Republican (from 1856)
EducationHamilton College
read law

Glenni William Scofield (March 11, 1817 – August 30, 1891) was a United States Representative from Pennsylvania, Register of the Treasury and a Judge of the Court of Claims.

Education and career[edit]

Born on March 11, 1817, in Dewittville, Chautauqua County, New York,[1] Scofield attended the common schools and learned the printing trade.[2] He returned to classical study and graduated from Hamilton College in 1840 and read law with Carlton Brandaga Curtis in Warren, Pennsylvania in 1842, briefly engaging in teaching while studying law.[3][2][1] He entered private practice in Warren from 1842 to 1846.[1] He was district attorney for Warren County, Pennsylvania from 1846 to 1848.[1] He was a member of the Pennsylvania House of Representatives from 1849 to 1851.[1] He resumed private practice in Warren circa 1851 to circa 1857.[1] He changed his partisan affiliation from anti-slavery Democratic to Republican in 1856.[4][2] He served in the Pennsylvania State Senate for the 19th district from 1857 to 1858 and for the 11th district from 1859 to 1860.[5][1] He was President Judge of the Pennsylvania Court of Common Pleas for the Eighteenth Judicial District from 1861 to 1863.[1]

Congressional service[edit]

Scofield was elected from Pennsylvania's 19th congressional district and later Pennsylvania's at-large congressional district as a Republican to the United States House of Representatives of the 38th United States Congress and to the five succeeding Congresses, serving from March 4, 1863, to March 3, 1875.[2] He served as Chairman of the United States House Committee on Revisal and Unfinished Business for the 39th United States Congress and Chairman of the United States House Committee on Naval Affairs for the 41st, 42nd and 43rd United States Congresses.[2] He was not a candidate for renomination in 1874.[2]

Scandal[edit]

Scofield was caught up in the scandal involving Congressman Oakes Ames who was censured for selling shares in Credit Mobilier at greatly reduced prices to fellow congressman. Ames had sold shares in Cedar Rapids stock bonds to Scofield and recommended he purchase shares in Credit Mobilier but the contract for the sale was never completed.[3]

Later career[edit]

Following his departure from Congress, Scofield returned to private practice in Warren from 1875 to 1878.[1] He was appointed as the Register of the Treasury for the United States Department of the Treasury by President Rutherford B. Hayes, serving from 1878 to 1881.[1]

Federal judicial service[edit]

Scofield was nominated by President James A. Garfield on May 19, 1881, to a seat on the Court of Claims (later the United States Court of Claims) vacated by Judge William H. Hunt.[1] He was confirmed by the United States Senate on May 20, 1881, and received his commission the same day.[1] His service terminated on July 29, 1891, due to his resignation.[1]

Death[edit]

Scofield died on August 30, 1891, in Warren.[1] He was interred in Oakland Cemetery in Warren.[6][2]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n "Scofield, Glenni William - Federal Judicial Center". www.fjc.gov.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g United States Congress. "Glenni William Scofield (id: S000164)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress.
  3. ^ a b Osterdahl, Andy. "The Strangest Names in American Political History". www.politicalstrangenames.blogspot.com. Retrieved 25 March 2019.
  4. ^ Scofield, Ellie G. (1892). Speeches of Glenni W. Scofield: With Biographical Sketch. Philadelphia: J.B. Lippincott Company. p. 10. Retrieved 25 March 2019.
  5. ^ "Pennsylvania State Senate - Glenni William Scofield Biography". www.legis.state.pa.us. Retrieved 24 March 2019.
  6. ^ "Glenni William Scofield". www.findagrave.com. Retrieved 24 March 2019.

Sources[edit]

Pennsylvania House of Representatives
Preceded by
Member of the Pennsylvania House of Representatives
1849–1851
Succeeded by
Pennsylvania State Senate
Preceded by
Member of the Pennsylvania Senate for the 19th district
1857–1858
Succeeded by
Samuel S. Wharton
Preceded by
George W. Brewer
Member of the Pennsylvania Senate for the 11th district
1859–1860
Succeeded by
Isaac Benson
U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
John Covode
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Pennsylvania's 19th congressional district

1863–1873
Succeeded by
Carlton Brandaga Curtis
Preceded by
District established
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Pennsylvania's at-large congressional district

1873–1875
Succeeded by
District abolished
Political offices
Preceded by
John Allison
Register of the Treasury
1878–1881
Succeeded by
Blanche Bruce
Legal offices
Preceded by
William H. Hunt
Judge of the Court of Claims
1881–1891
Succeeded by
Stanton J. Peelle