Grimsby Telegraph

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Grimsby Telegraph
Grimsby Telegraph Front Page
Grimsby Telegraph cover on 26 June 2014
TypeDaily newspaper
FormatTabloid
Owner(s)Reach plc
Editor-in-chiefNeil Hodgkinson[1]
Deputy editorJamie Macaskill[2]
Sports editorTrevor Green[3]
Founded1897; 122 years ago (1897)
Political alignmentNeutral, Populist
LanguageEnglish
HeadquartersHeritage House
CityGrimsby
CountryEngland
Circulation14,344 (2017)[4]
ISSN0961-7051
OCLC number909904576
Websitewww.grimsbytelegraph.co.uk

The Grimsby Telegraph is a daily British regional newspaper for the town of Grimsby and the surrounding area that makes up North East Lincolnshire including the rural towns of Market Rasen and Louth. The main area for the paper's distribution is in or around Grimsby and Cleethorpes. It is published six days a week (daily except Sundays) with a free sister paper (Grimsby Target) being published once per week.

Headquarters in May 2007
Rear of the offices in March 2008

History[edit]

The paper was founded in 1897 as the Eastern Daily Telegraph.[5] In 1899, it was renamed the Grimsby Daily Telegraph, while in 1932 it became the Grimsby Evening Telegraph.[6] In 2002, it adopted its present name.

On 26 October 1976, after the newspaper offices had been knocked down and rebuilt, Anne, Princess Royal visited Grimsby and opened the new offices.[7]

The newspaper began publication in "full-colour" print for the first time in 1995 for all editorial sections.[8]

In March 1999, the newspaper launched its www.thisisgrimsby.co.uk website to break stories from the Grimsby Evening Telegraph as well as its sister weeklies, the Grimsby Target.[9]

Due to economic downturn, restructuring and cost-cutting measures were put into place by the end of 2008, Daily Mail and General Trust closed their regional printing arm – Harmsworth printing plant, several Northcliffe newspapers were printed at the Cleethorpes Road site in Grimsby including the Hull Daily Mail.[10][11]

After spending 118 years at offices located in Cleethorpe Road, Grimsby, Grimsby Telegraph moved to new offices in October 2015, on the first floor of Heritage House on Fisherman's Wharf – next to Grimsby Fishing Heritage Centre.[12]

As part of a Trinity Mirror restructure, Neil Hodgkinson, editor of the Hull Daily Mail, was promoted to Editor-in-chief in February 2016 for Humber and Lincolnshire regions, overseeing the Grimsby Telegraph, Scunthorpe Telegraph and Lincolnshire Echo as well as the Mail.[1]

The weekly sister paper that is free, circulates under the name of Grimsby Post and Cleethorpes Post respectively.

Due to public demand, the Grimsby Target was relaunched in September 2015, it had originally closed back in March 2007.[13]

Editors[edit]

1897–1897: Philip Reid[14]
1897–1904: Alfred Martin[15]
1904–1914: Wilfred Vere Doughty BA, JP[16]
1914–1932: Thomas William Symonds[17]
1932–1933: Harold Wild[18]
1933–1938: Hugh Paterson Haddow OBE, MC[19][20]
1938–1946: John Taylor Brown MC[21]
1946–1960: James H Giles[22]
1960–1966: James Humble[23]
1966–1973: Jack Whitfield[24]
1973–1982: Frank Shelton[7]
1982–1995: Peter Moore[25]
1995–2017: Michelle Laylor[26]
2017–: Jamie Macaskill

Ownership and finances[edit]

In 2012, Local World acquired owner Northcliffe Media from Daily Mail and General Trust.[27] In September 2015, Daily Mail and General Trust confirmed it had entered into talks to sell Local World to Trinity Mirror;[28] the following month they reached an agreement with Local World's other shareholders to buy the company.[29]

Following the acquisition of the UK publishing assets of Northern & Shell, including the Daily Express, Sunday Express, Daily Star and OK!; Trinity Mirror announced a plan to rebrand as Reach, subject to investor approval at a meeting scheduled for May 2018.[30]

Print sales fell to 19,824, a drop of 5.1 percent year on year in the second half of 2014.[31] Circulation in the second half of 2016 was 9.4 percent year on year to an average of 16,406 copies per night, offset mainly due to website growth.[32]

Awards[edit]

The Grimsby Telegraph won "Scoop of the Year" in 1994 at the British Press Awards.[33] Junior reporter Clare Henderson for the newspaper discovered hours before the official announcement that Norman Lamont was resigning as Chancellor of the Exchequer after his mother, who lived in Grimsby had been told by her son he was quitting, beating the country's top political journalists and Fleet Street's finest.[34][35]

In 2001, Grimsby Telegraph won the pan-European award for customer care and service.[36]

The Grimsby Telegraph was named regional best "Front page" of the year for 2007 at the Press Gazette awards.[37]

Supplements[edit]

  • Monday – 12-page bygones section[13]
  • Tuesday – Young Stars youth sports section[13]
  • Wednesday – Midweek Guide, what’s-on section[13]
  • Thursday – Motor Mail
  • Friday – Property Guide
  • Saturday – Weekend Guide, including TV listings, cinema information and local shows and gigs[13]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Linford, Paul (8 February 2016). "Trinity Mirror unveils new structure following Local World takeover". HoldtheFrontPage. Derby. Retrieved 11 November 2018.
  2. ^ "Jamie Macaskill – Digital Editor". Grimsby Telegraph. Retrieved 11 November 2018.
  3. ^ "Trevor Green – Sports Editor". Grimsby Telegraph. Retrieved 25 August 2018.
  4. ^ "Certificate for Grimsby Telegraph January 2017 to December 2017" (PDF). Audit Bureau of Circulations (UK). 21 August 2018. p. 2. Retrieved 10 November 2018.
  5. ^ "Grimsby Daily Telegraph in British Newspaper Archive". The British Newspaper Archive. London: Findmypast Newspaper Archive. 21 June 2017. Retrieved 11 November 2018.
  6. ^ Joanne Shattock, The Cambridge Bibliography of English Literature, Volume 4, p.2939
  7. ^ a b Bould, Sarah (3 June 2011). "Editor who served in World War Two dies aged 88". HoldtheFrontPage. Derby. Retrieved 10 November 2018.
  8. ^ Peter Chapman (1997). 100 Years of the Grimsby Evening Telegraph. Grimsby: Grimsby and Scunthorpe Newspapers. p. 79. ISBN 0 9530880 0 6.
  9. ^ Page, Mark (21 June 2017). "Looking back at the history of the Grimsby Telegraph website from 1999 until today". Grimsby Telegraph. Retrieved 10 November 2018.
  10. ^ "Jobs go as printing press closes". BBC News. 24 November 2008. Retrieved 22 July 2016.
  11. ^ Hooker, Adam (26 September 2008). "Print jobs at risk as Harmsworth proposes Grimsby site closure". PrintWeek online. London: MA Business. Retrieved 23 July 2016.
  12. ^ "Grimsby Telegraph moves to modern offices in Heritage House". Grimsby Telegraph. 6 October 2015. Archived from the original on 18 October 2015. Retrieved 22 July 2016.
  13. ^ a b c d e Turvill, William (3 September 2015). "Grimsby Target makes return to print eight years after being shut down". Press Gazette. London: Progressive Media International. Retrieved 24 July 2016.
  14. ^ Peter Chapman (1997). 100 Years of the Grimsby Evening Telegraph. Grimsby: Grimsby and Scunthorpe Newspapers. p. 6. ISBN 0 9530880 0 6.
  15. ^ Peter Chapman (1997). 100 Years of the Grimsby Evening Telegraph. Grimsby: Grimsby and Scunthorpe Newspapers. p. 8. ISBN 0 9530880 0 6.
  16. ^ Peter Chapman (1997). 100 Years of the Grimsby Evening Telegraph. Grimsby: Grimsby and Scunthorpe Newspapers. pp. 21–22. ISBN 0 9530880 0 6.
  17. ^ Peter Chapman (1997). 100 Years of the Grimsby Evening Telegraph. Grimsby: Grimsby and Scunthorpe Newspapers. p. 31. ISBN 0 9530880 0 6.
  18. ^ Peter Chapman (1997). 100 Years of the Grimsby Evening Telegraph. Grimsby: Grimsby and Scunthorpe Newspapers. p. 47. ISBN 0 9530880 0 6.
  19. ^ Peter Chapman (1997). 100 Years of the Grimsby Evening Telegraph. Grimsby: Grimsby and Scunthorpe Newspapers. p. 51. ISBN 0 9530880 0 6.
  20. ^ "Supplement to the London Gazette" (PDF). The Gazette. London. 9 June 1949. Retrieved 4 December 2018.
  21. ^ Peter Chapman (1997). 100 Years of the Grimsby Evening Telegraph. Grimsby: Grimsby and Scunthorpe Newspapers. p. 59. ISBN 0 9530880 0 6.
  22. ^ Peter Chapman (1997). 100 Years of the Grimsby Evening Telegraph. Grimsby: Grimsby and Scunthorpe Newspapers. p. 65. ISBN 0 9530880 0 6.
  23. ^ Lambourne, Helen (19 June 2015). "Former editor who became Northcliffe director dies aged 95". HoldtheFrontPage. Derby. Retrieved 10 November 2018.
  24. ^ Staff, HoldTheFrontPage (25 June 2007). "Former editor dies aged 88". HoldtheFrontPage. Derby. Retrieved 12 November 2018.
  25. ^ Staff, HoldTheFrontPage (25 June 2007). "Former editor Peter Moore dies at 61". HoldtheFrontPage. Derby. Retrieved 12 November 2018.
  26. ^ Mayhew, Freddy (17 February 2017). "Grimsby and Scunthorpe Telegraphs left without editors – Michelle Laylor says exit 'sad end to wonderful career'". Press Gazette. London: Progressive Media International. Retrieved 10 November 2018.
  27. ^ "Daily Mail sells regional newspapers to Local World". BBC News. 21 November 2012. Retrieved 20 April 2014.
  28. ^ Soumithri, Mamidipudi (14 September 2015). "Trinity Mirror in talks to buy rival Local World". Reuters. New York: Thomson Reuters. Retrieved 23 July 2016.
  29. ^ Sweney, Mark (28 October 2015). "Trinity Mirror confirms £220m Local World deal". The Guardian. London. Retrieved 22 July 2016.
  30. ^ Sweney, Mark (5 March 2018). "Trinity Mirror to rebrand as Reach after Express and Star deal". The Guardian. London. Retrieved 10 November 2018.
  31. ^ Turvill, William (25 February 2015). "UK regional dailies see sales decline by average of 10 per cent year on year". Press Gazette. London: Progressive Media International. Retrieved 10 November 2018.
  32. ^ Ponsford, Dominic (23 February 2017). "UK regional dailies lose print sales by average of 12.5 per cent: Wigan Post and The National are biggest fallers". Press Gazette. London: Progressive Media International. Retrieved 10 November 2018.
  33. ^ Leapman, Michael (19 February 1994). "Reporter nurtures a scoop". The Independent. London. Retrieved 11 November 2018.
  34. ^ Gazette, Press (1 May 2003). "Back Issues 01.05.03". Press Gazette. London: Progressive Media International. Retrieved 11 November 2018.
  35. ^ Leonard, Tom (9 August 2002). "Man who made all the news fit to print". The Telegraph. London. Retrieved 11 November 2018.
  36. ^ Bannister, Larissa (22 October 2001). "Grimsby Telegraph classified carries off customer care prize". Campaign UK. London: Haymarket Media Group. Retrieved 23 July 2016.
  37. ^ Staff, HoldTheFrontPage (25 June 2007). "Regional press award winners celebrate". HoldtheFrontPage. Derby. Retrieved 11 November 2018.

External links[edit]