Harold Anderson (basketball)

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Harold Anderson
Personal information
Born(1902-09-11)September 11, 1902
Akron, Ohio
DiedJune 13, 1967(1967-06-13) (aged 64)
Fort Lauderdale, Florida
NationalityAmerican
Career information
High schoolCentral (Akron, Ohio)
CollegeOtterbein (1921–1924)
Coaching career1934–1963
Career history
As coach:
1934–1942Toledo
1943–1963Bowling Green
Career highlights and awards
  • NIT bids (1942, 1944–1946, 1948, 1949, 1954)
  • NCAA Tournament bids (1959, 1962, 1963)
Basketball Hall of Fame as coach
College Basketball Hall of Fame
Inducted in 2006

W. Harold Anderson (September 11, 1902 – June 13, 1967) was an American college men's basketball coach at Bowling Green State University and the University of Toledo. As a player, he played at Otterbein College, a small liberal arts college outside Columbus, Ohio. As a coach he was one of the first to win more than 500 games on the collegiate level. Anderson was inducted into the Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame in 1985 and the College Basketball Hall of Fame in 2006.

Early Life[edit]

Anderson was born September 11, 1902 in Akron, Ohio. He attended Akron Central High School, where he played football, baseball, basketball and ran track.[1]

He then attended Otterbein College in Columbus, Ohio where he earned eleven athletic letters: three each in football, baseball and basketball and two in track.[1]

Coaching career[edit]

Anderson began his career as a teacher and coach at Wauseon High School (Ohio) and Toledo Waite High School.[1]

Andreson Coached at the University of Toledo from 1934-1942 and compiled a record of 142-41.[2]

Anderson then coached at Bowling Green State University from 1943-1963, with a record of 362-155.[2][3]

His career collegiate coaching record was 504-226.[2][3]

After his retirement from coaching, Anderson continued to serve Bowling Green State University as the Director of Athletics.[4]

While pioneering the run and gun, up-tempo style of play, he developed eleven (all of whom played in the NBA) All-America athletes, including Don Otten, Hall of Fame inductee Nate Thurmond and 1950 NBA draft No. 1 overall pick Chuck Share.[4]

Honors/Awards[edit]

  • Bowling Green State University Athletics Hall of Fame (1966).[6]
  • Toledo Athletics Hall of Fame (1978).[7]
  • Anderson is one of the charter inductees of the Ohio Basketball Hall of Fame (2006).[10]

Head coaching record[edit]

Season Team Overall Conference Standing Postseason
Toledo Rockets (Independent) (1934–1942)
1934–35 Toledo 13-3
1935–36 Toledo 12-4
1936–37 Toledo 18-4
1937–38 Toledo 14-6
1938–39 Toledo 17-10
1939–40 Toledo 24-6
1940–41 Toledo 21-3
1941–42 Toledo 23-5 NIT Semifinals/Nit 4th Place
Toledo: 142-41
Bowling Green Falcons (1942-1953 Independent,1953-1963 MAC) (1942–1963)
1942–43 Bowling Green 18-5
1943–44 Bowling Green 22-4 NIT Quarterfinals
1944–45 Bowling Green 24-4 NIT Runner Up
1945–46 Bowling Green 27-5 NIT Quarterfinals
1946–47 Bowling Green 28-7
1947–48 Bowling Green 27-6 NIT Quarterfinals
1948–49 Bowling Green 24-7 NIT Semifinals/NIT 3rd Place
1949–50 Bowling Green 19-11
1950–51 Bowling Green 10-4**(15-12) Gene Meullich (5-8); Harold Anderson (10-4)
1951–52 Bowling Green 17-10
1952–53 Bowling Green 12-15
1953–54 Bowling Green 17-7 10-3 2nd NIT Quarterfinals
1954–55 Bowling Green 6-16 5-9 T-5th
1955–56 Bowling Green 4-19 1-11 7th
1956–57 Bowling Green 14-9 7-5 T-3rd
1957–58 Bowling Green 15-8 6-6 4th
1958–59 Bowling Green 18-8 9-3 T-1st NCAA 1st Round
1959–60 Bowling Green 10-14 6-6 3rd
1960–61 Bowling Green 10-14 4-8 T-5th
1961–62 Bowling Green 21-4 11-1 1st NCAA 1st Round
1962–63 Bowling Green 19-8 9-3 1st NCAA 2nd Round
Bowling Green: 362-185[2][3] 68-55
Total: 504-226[2][3]

      National champion         Postseason invitational champion  
      Conference regular season champion         Conference regular season and conference tournament champion
      Division regular season champion       Division regular season and conference tournament champion
      Conference tournament champion

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Harold Anderson (Hall of Fame Coach)".
  2. ^ a b c d e "Harold Anderson Coaching Record". College Basketball at Sports-Reference.com.
  3. ^ a b c d "Harold Anderson (Hall of Fame Coach)".
  4. ^ a b "Harold Anderson (1966) - Hall of Fame". Bowling Green State University Athletics.
  5. ^ "BGSU announces Stroh Center debuts". The Toledo Blade. Archived from the original on 2013-02-04. Retrieved 2012-12-18.
  6. ^ "Harold Anderson (1966) - Hall of Fame". Bowling Green State University Athletics.
  7. ^ "Harold Anderson (1978)". University of Toledo Athletics.
  8. ^ "The Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame :: Harold Anderson". www.hoophall.com. Archived from the original on 2018-12-05. Retrieved 2019-01-20.
  9. ^ "W. Harold Anderson".
  10. ^ "Ohio Basketball Hall of Fame". ohiobasketballhalloffame.com.

External links[edit]