Helen Gorrill

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Helen Gorrill (Helen Gørrill) is a British artist, curator, feminist and art historian.[1] She was awarded a Doctorate in contemporary British Painting in 2017, co-supervised by the Royal College of Art. Her PhD thesis "The Gendered Economic and Symbolic Values in Contemporary British Painting" was subsequently acquired by the prestigious publishers I.B. Tauris/Bloomsbury.[2]

Helen Gorrill's book "Women Can't Paint: Gender, the Glass Ceiling and Values in Contemporary Art" will be published in 2019.[3]

Dr Gorrill's artwork is included in private and public collections around the world, including in the New York Brooklyn Museum's Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art's digital archive.[4] Helen Gørrill’s artwork explores ideas about time, history and reality; using contemporary imagery that juxtaposes with the Old Masters she sets out to reappropriate. Her new artwork focuses on vandalising old masters and reviving art historical portraits through photo bombing and incorporating elements from contemporary sub-cultures, and often incorporates media such as lipstick, eyeliner and human hair. Within this context, the striking images hover between the 17th century and today’s climate of uncertainty. Helen Gørrill's collaged and painted portraits have been commissioned from prestigious clients such as the new Bankside Hotel adj. Tate Modern in London.[5]

Helen Gorrill's doctoral and postdoctoral research discovered the emergence of a new "Androgynous Aesthetics" in contemporary British painting since the 1990s [6] and an "Essentialist Aesthetics" in contemporary European painting.[7] She also writes for The Guardian on matters of equality and diversity in the arts, arguing that publicly funded museums are partly responsible for discrimination and the low visibility of contemporary female artists operating today.[8] She also writes for academic presses, such as the International Journal of the Arts in Society, on matters pertaining to art and gender [9] and co-edits the Collective and Collaborative Drawing Conversations series of books published by Cambridge Scholars.[10]

Gorrill's artwork has also been the subject of some controversy. In 2009 her degree show, featuring drawings inspired by religious pamphlets that featured dominant women and sexually submissive men, was censored. In 2018 Gorrill stated that "women can't paint! There's no such thing as a great woman artist!".[11] Guardian writer Henry Porter wrote, "The male figures have been censored but to protect whom? The spam I receive contains more indecency than Ms Gorrill's work. And it is much less interesting because she makes a valid point."[12]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Dr Helen Gorrill". Axisweb. Retrieved 17 May 2019.
  2. ^ "DegreeArt.com The Original Online Art Gallery". www.degreeart.com. Retrieved 17 May 2019.
  3. ^ Bloomsbury.com. "Bloomsbury - I.B. Tauris". www.bloomsbury.com. Retrieved 17 May 2019.
  4. ^ "Brooklyn Museum: EASCFA Exhibitions". www.brooklynmuseum.org. Retrieved 17 May 2019.
  5. ^ "Helen Gørrill | DegreeArt.com The Original Online Art Gallery". www.degreeart.com. Retrieved 17 May 2019.
  6. ^ "Dr Helen Gørrill". Retrieved 15 March 2017.
  7. ^ "Dr Helen Gørrill". Retrieved 15 March 2017.
  8. ^ Gørrill, Helen (13 August 2018). "Are female artists worth collecting? Tate doesn't seem to think so | Helen Gørrill". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Retrieved 17 May 2019.
  9. ^ Common Ground. "Bookstore | Scholar". cgscholar.com. Retrieved 17 May 2019.
  10. ^ "Cambridge Scholars Publishing. Collective and Collaborative Drawing in Contemporary Practice". www.cambridgescholars.com. Retrieved 17 May 2019.
  11. ^ Gørrill, Helen (13 August 2018). "Are female artists worth collecting? Tate doesn't seem to think so | Helen Gørrill". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Retrieved 17 May 2019.
  12. ^ Porter, Henry (30 May 2009). "Britain is not radical enough. That is why we're in trouble". The Guardian. Retrieved 30 March 2016.