Indianapolis Fire Department

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Indianapolis Fire Department
Our Family Serving Your Family
Operational area
Country United States
State Indiana
City Indianapolis
Agency overview[1][2]
EstablishedNovember 14, 1859 (1859-11-14)
Annual calls168,131 (2017)
Employees1,170 (2017)
Annual budget$145,068,571 (2014)
StaffingCareer
Fire chiefErnest Malone
EMS levelALS
IAFF416
Facilities and equipment[1]
Battalions7
Stations44
Engines44
Trucks13
Tillers1
Platforms8
Squads4
Rescues5
AmbulancesProvided by IEMS
Tenders4
HAZMAT5
USAR2
Rescue boats5
Light and air4
Website
Official website
IAFF website

The Indianapolis Fire Department (IFD) provides fire and rescue protection and emergency medical services to the city of Indianapolis, Indiana. In total the department serves 278 square miles (720 km2).[1]

History[edit]

The first fire department in Indianapolis was not founded until June 20, 1826. It was a volunteer department that had to use a church bell for alarms, and had only ladders and leather buckets to fight fires. This was seventeen months after the first recorded fire in Indianapolis occurred on January 17, 1825, which took place across the street from the county courthouse in a tavern.[3]

In 1835, a law was passed requiring the purchase of an engine, along with better equipment, to be partially funded by the state and partially by the city, in order to protect the Indiana statehouse. From this, the Marion Fire, Hose, and Protection Company was established. An additional volunteer company was founded in 1841 and there were eight total volunteer companies in Indianapolis by 1859. Collectively, 600 men were volunteers in these eight companies, and although unpaid, they did receive perks such as immunity from being called on juries or militia duty, and not having to pay poll taxes or taxes for roads.[4]

The volunteer companies were rather political, and tended to express their views freely. They were also known to break into brothels and freely use their hoses on the clientele and the interior walls, wrecking the places; this was done not for moral reasons, but rather, to amuse themselves.[5] As a result, Mayor Samuel D. Maxwell and the Indianapolis City Council established a paid force on November 14, 1859, so that the council could have control over Indianapolis' fire protection, which it did not have over the volunteers. The Indianapolis Fire Department began with a hook and ladder company and two hand engines, but would in 1860 gain their first steam engine.[6]

The former IFD Headquarters at 301 E. New York Street is on the National Register of Historic Places.

The paid firemen had no days off, were not allowed to leave their post except for one meal, and were seldom allowed to leave the firehouse unless on fire business or a family emergency. An ordinance in 1859 made it illegal to give firemen alcoholic beverages. Their clothes were irregular; uniforms were not worn until 1874, with a regulation uniform established in 1928. Firemen had to buy their own uniforms until 1943, when a $60 clothing allowance was established. An attempt to remove politics from the fire department was not very successful; it was necessary to mandate that the department staff be half Republican and half Democrat, and the role of fire chief was based on political affiliation and family contacts.[7]

The first dog to discover arson for the Indianapolis Fire Department was acquired in July 1993.[8]

Mergers with township fire departments[edit]

Since 2007, several the fire departments in the eight townships in Marion County other than Center Township that were not previously part of the IFD coverage area have been absorbed by IFD. As of 2016, five of the eight township fire departments have merged with IFD:[9]

The three townships retaining their own fire departments as of 2019 are all on the west side of Marion County.

Operations[edit]

There are currently fourteen Divisions of Operations within the Indianapolis Fire Department: Communications, Emergency Operations, Emergency Medical Services, Executive Services, Finance and Pension, Fire Investigations Section, Fire and Life Safety, Homeland Security/Special Operations and Training, Quartermaster, Information Technology, Media Relations, Safety, Support Services, and USAR Indiana Task Force One.[10]

USAR Task Force 1[edit]

The Indianapolis Fire Department is the founding member of one of the 28 FEMA Urban Search and Rescue Task Force.[11] Indiana Task Force 1 (IN-TF1) is made up of members of multiple fire departments in Marion County.[12]

Indianapolis EMS[edit]

911 Ambulance services in the city of Indianapolis are provided by Indianapolis Emergency Medical Services (IEMS), a division of the Health and Hospital Corporation of Marion County. In 2010, the Indianapolis Fire Department decided to discontinue the operation of the transporting ambulance assets acquired from the consolidation of Washington, Lawrence, and Franklin Township fire departments into IFD. Wishard Ambulance Service absorbed the civilian staff released from the decommissioned IFD ambulances and in December 2010, the newly enlarged Wishard Ambulance Service was rebranded as Indianapolis Emergency Medical Services[13]. As of 2018 IEMS operates 42 ambulances, with 32 of them deployed during peak hours.[14] Fourteen of these ambulances are co-located at IFD fire stations.[15] While IEMS is not a part of the Indianapolis Fire Department, the two agencies work closely together in daily operations and long term EMS system planning. IEMS also provides educational and logistical support to IFD's EMS operations. Members of IEMS may choose to join the IAFF Union 416.[16]

Stations and apparatus[edit]

Fire Station # 32, located at 6330 Guildford Ave.
Fire Station Neighborhood Engine Company Ladder (Tiller or Tower) Company Indianapolis Emergency Medical Services Medic Unit Special Unit Command Unit Battalion
1 Haughville Engine 1 Ladder 1 Tactical 1 (Confined Space/Collapse) 7 [17]
2 Mitthoefer Engine 2 Medic 2 4 [18]
3 Fountain Square Engine 3 Battalion 5 5 [19]
4 Greenbriar Engine 4 Ladder 4 Medic 4 1 [20]
5 Methodist Hospital Engine 5 Medic 5 Tactical 5 (Confined Space/Collapse) Battalion 1 1 [21]
6 Nora Engine 6 Ladder 6 (Tower) Tanker 6

Boat 6

2 [22]
7 Renaissance Place Engine 7 Ladder 7 (Tiller) Squad 7

Tactical 7 (Heavy/Water/Rope)

Boat 7

Car 10 (Shift Commander)

Safety 4

7 [23]
8 Millersville Engine 8 Safety 2 3 [24]
9 Castleton Engine 9 Ladder 9 Medic 9 Tactical 9 (Heavy) 2 [25]
10 Brightwood Engine 10 Ladder 10 (Tower) Squad 10 Battalion 3 3 [26]
11 Irish Hill Engine 11 Medic 11 EMS Duty Officer 6 5 [27]
12 Crooked Creek Engine 12 Medic 12 1 [28]
13 Canal District Engine 13 Ladder 13 (Tower) Squad 13

Tactical 13 (HazMat)

Battalion 7 7 [29]
14 Kenwood Forrest Engine 14 Ladder 14 Medic 99 Squad 14

Tactical 14 (Heavy/Water/Rope)

Boat 14

1 [30]
15 Christian Park Engine 15 Ladder 15 (Tower) 5 [31]
16 Acton Engine 16 Medic 16 Tanker 16 6 [32]
17 Avelon Hills Engine 17 Medic 17 Battalion 2 2 [33]
18 Hawthorne Engine 18 Medic 18 Tactical Support Unit 18 (Air)

Hazmat Support Unit

7 [34]
19 Near Southwestside "The Valley" Engine 19 Ladder 19 (Tower) Tactical 19 (Decon)

Foam 19

7 [35]
20 Little Flower Engine 20 Ladder 20 3 [36]
21 Clearwater Engine 21 Medic 21 Rehab Support Unit EMS Duty Officer 2 2 [37]
22 Martindale Engine 22 Ladder 22 (Tower) 3 [38]
23 Southdale Engine 23 Medic 23 Battalion 6

Safety 6

6 [39]
24 Devington Engine 24 Medic 24 3 [40]
25 Irvington Engine 25 Tactical Support Unit 25 (Air) 3 [41]
26 Perry Meridian Engine 26 Medic 26 6 [42]
27 Brookside Engine 27 Ladder 27 5 [43]
28 West Geist Engine 28 Boat 28 2 [44]
29 Garfield Park Engine 29 Ladder 29 Medic 29 Squad 29

Tactical Support Unit 29 (Air)

USAR Trailer 29

5 [45]
30 Eagledale Engine 30 Ladder 30 1 [46]
31 Fairgrounds Engine 31 Ladder 31 Medic 31 Tactical 31 (Decon)

Tactical Support Unit 31 (Air)

1 [47]
32 Broad Ripple Engine 32 2 [48]
33 West Eagledale Engine 33 1 [49]
34 West Edgewood Engine 34 Ladder 34 Tactical 34 (Heavy)

Major Incident Response Vehicle

6 [50]
35 Southport Engine 35 Ladder 35 (Tower) 6 [51]
36 Geist East Engine 36 (City of Lawrence) Ladder 36 Medic 36 (City of Lawrence) 2 [52]
41 Washington Square Engine 41 Medic 41 4 [53]
42 Raymond Park Engine 42 Medic 42 Tanker 42 4 [54]
43 Eastgate Engine 43 Ladder 43 (Tower) Tactical 43 (Heavy) Battalion 4 4 [55]
44 Eastside Engine 44 Ladder 44 Medic 44 Tactical 44 (HazMat) 4 [56]
45 Far Eastside Engine 45 Medic 98 4 [57]
53 Bunker Hill Engine 53 Medic 53 Grass 53 6 [58]
55 Wanamaker Engine 55 Ladder 55 Tanker 55 4 [59]

Notable incidents[edit]

Ramada Inn Air Crash and Fire[edit]

The Ramada Inn Air Crash and Fire was an aircraft accident that occurred at the Airport Ramada Inn in Indianapolis, Indiana when a United States Air Force pilot failed to reach the runway and the plane crashed into a nearby Ramada Inn.[60] On the morning of October 20, 1987, a United States Air Force A-7D-4-CV Corsair II, serial 69-6207, sustained some sort of engine failure about 15 miles (24 km) southwest of the city at around 31,000 feet.[61] The pilot survived after ejecting but 9 people were killed in the hotel when the aircraft smashed into the side of the building.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Quick Facts". Indianapolis Fire Department. Retrieved 29 April 2015.
  2. ^ "2014 Budget" (PDF). City of Indianapolis. Retrieved 30 April 2015.
  3. ^ Bodenhamer, David. The Encyclopedia of Indianapolis (Indiana University Press, 1994) pg.774
  4. ^ Bodenhamer pg.774
  5. ^ "IFD History". IFD. 2005-05-13. Archived from the original on 2008-07-02. Retrieved 2008-07-08.
  6. ^ Bodenhamer pg.774, 775
  7. ^ Bodenhamer pg.775, 776
  8. ^ Bodenhamer pg.776
  9. ^ Tuohy, John (February 11, 2014). "Township officials fume over Indianapolis fire merger bill". Indianapolis Star. Retrieved 18 June 2014.
  10. ^ IFD Administration
  11. ^ "Task Force Locations". FEMA. Retrieved 30 April 2015.
  12. ^ "About Us". Indiana Task Force 1. Retrieved 1 May 2015.
  13. ^ "History of Indianapolis EMS – Indianapolis EMS". Retrieved May 5, 2019.
  14. ^ "IEMS 2013 Annual Report" (PDF). Indianapolis EMS. Retrieved 30 April 2015.
  15. ^ "Indianapolis Fire Apparatus". Indiana Fire Trucks. Retrieved 30 April 2015.
  16. ^ "FAQs". Indianapolis EMS. Retrieved 30 April 2015.
  17. ^ "Station 1". Indianapolis Fire Department. Retrieved 29 April 2015.
  18. ^ "Station 2". Indianapolis Fire Department. Retrieved 29 April 2015.
  19. ^ "Station 3". Indianapolis Fire Department. Retrieved 29 April 2015.
  20. ^ "Station 4". Indianapolis Fire Department. Retrieved 29 April 2015.
  21. ^ "Station 5". Indianapolis Fire Department. Retrieved 29 April 2015.
  22. ^ "Station 6". Indianapolis Fire Department. Retrieved 29 April 2015.
  23. ^ "Station 7". Indianapolis Fire Department. Retrieved 29 April 2015.
  24. ^ "Station 8". Indianapolis Fire Department. Retrieved 29 April 2015.
  25. ^ "Station 9". Indianapolis Fire Department. Retrieved 29 April 2015.
  26. ^ "Station 10". Indianapolis Fire Department. Retrieved 29 April 2015.
  27. ^ "Station 11". Indianapolis Fire Department. Retrieved 29 April 2015.
  28. ^ "Station 12". Indianapolis Fire Department. Retrieved 29 April 2015.
  29. ^ "Station 13". Indianapolis Fire Department. Retrieved 29 April 2015.
  30. ^ "Station 14". Indianafiretrucks.com. Retrieved 19 August 2015.
  31. ^ "Station 15". Indianapolis Fire Department. Retrieved 29 April 2015.
  32. ^ "Station 52". Indianapolis Fire Department. Retrieved 29 April 2015.
  33. ^ "Station 17". Indianapolis Fire Department. Retrieved 29 April 2015.
  34. ^ "Station 18". Indianapolis Fire Department. Retrieved 29 April 2015.
  35. ^ "Station 19". Indianapolis Fire Department. Retrieved 29 April 2015.http://fox59.com/2017/01/09/indianapolis-names-the-valley-as-neighborhood-of-the-month-for-january-2017/
  36. ^ "Station 20". Indianapolis Fire Department. Retrieved 29 April 2015.
  37. ^ "Station 21". Indianapolis Fire Department. Retrieved 29 April 2015.
  38. ^ "Station 22". Indianapolis Fire Department. Retrieved 29 April 2015.
  39. ^ "Station 23". Indianapolis Fire Department. Retrieved 29 April 2015.
  40. ^ "Station 24". Indianapolis Fire Department. Retrieved 29 April 2015.
  41. ^ "Station 25". Indianapolis Fire Department. Retrieved 29 April 2015.
  42. ^ "Station 26". Indianapolis Fire Department. Retrieved 29 April 2015.
  43. ^ "Station 27". Indianapolis Fire Department. Retrieved 29 April 2015.
  44. ^ "Station 28". Indianapolis Fire Department. Retrieved 29 April 2015.
  45. ^ "Station 29". Indianapolis Fire Department. Archived from the original on 20 December 2014. Retrieved 29 April 2015. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  46. ^ "Station 30". Indianapolis Fire Department. Retrieved 29 April 2015.
  47. ^ "Station 31". Indianapolis Fire Department. Retrieved 29 April 2015.
  48. ^ "Station 32". Indianapolis Fire Department. Retrieved 29 April 2015.
  49. ^ "Station 33". Indianapolis Fire Department. Retrieved 29 April 2015.
  50. ^ "Station 34". Indianapolis Fire Department. Retrieved 29 April 2015.
  51. ^ "Station 35". Indianapolis Fire Department. Retrieved 29 April 2015.
  52. ^ "Station 36". Indianapolis Fire Department. Retrieved 29 April 2015.
  53. ^ "Station 41". Indianapolis Fire Department. Retrieved 29 April 2015.
  54. ^ "Station 42". Indianapolis Fire Department. Retrieved 29 April 2015.
  55. ^ "Station 43". Indianapolis Fire Department. Retrieved 29 April 2015.
  56. ^ "Station 44". Indianapolis Fire Department. Retrieved 29 April 2015.
  57. ^ "Station 45". Indianapolis Fire Department. Retrieved 29 April 2015.
  58. ^ "Station 53". Indianapolis Fire Department. Retrieved 29 April 2015.
  59. ^ "Station 55". Indianapolis Fire Department. Retrieved 29 April 2015.
  60. ^ "Plane Crashes". Indianapolis Star. 2002-05-04. Retrieved 2008-07-08.
  61. ^ Indianapolis Star staff report, Indiana plane crashes Archived June 27, 2013, at the Wayback Machine, The Indianapolis Star Online, May 1, 2002, accessed October 8, 2006.

Coordinates: 39°47′27.6″N 86°8′52.8″W / 39.791000°N 86.148000°W / 39.791000; -86.148000