Iraqis in Norway

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Iraqis in Norway
Total population
32,304 (2017)
Regions with significant populations
Oslo, Bergen, Stavanger, Bærum, Trondheim, Drammen, Kristiansand, Fredrikstad, Asker [1]
Languages
Norwegian and Mesopotamian Arabic
also Kurdish (Sorani and Kurmanji dialects), Turkish (Iraqi Turkmen/Turkoman dialects), and Neo-Aramaic (Chaldean, Ashuri, and Mandaic)
Religion
Predominantly Islam (Shia and Sunni)
Minority Syriac Christianity and Catholicism
Related ethnic groups
Arabs, Armenians, Assyrians, Azeris, Chaldeans, Iranians, Mizrahim, Turks,
Some descendants Norwegians

Iraqis in Norway make up approximately 32,304 people. They are mostly refugees from the Iran–Iraq War, the Saddam regime and in particular the Iraq War. Iraqis are the fifth largest immigrant group in Norway after Poles, Swedes, Pakistanis and Somalis.

Demographics[edit]

As of 1 January 2012, the Norwegian Statistisk Sentralbyrå reported that there were 28, 935 Iraqis in Norway of which 21, 784 are first generation immigrants and 7 151 are born in Norway to two Iraqi parents.[2]

Due to a large Iraqi population present in Norway, many have integrated and married Norwegians, as from 1996 to 2004, 179 marriages were contracted between a resident Iraqi man and a Norwegian woman, which makes up 19 per cent of the marriages.[3] Iraqis are a group of refugees with a relatively short duration of residence in Norway (80 per cent have lived in Norway less than 10 years).[3]

According to a Statistics Norway report in 2017 ordered by immigration minister Sylvi Listhaug[4] investigating crime among immigrants in the 2010-2013 period, it was found Iraqis, together with Somalis, Iranians and Afghans had the highest over-represented as perpetrators of crime.[5] With 125 perpetrators out of 1000, Iraqis were over-represented when compared to the Norwegian population (45 out of 1000). Over-representation of Iraqi perpetrators remained after gender balance, age distribution, city of residence and employment was taken adjusted for at 90 out of 1000.[6]

Notable people[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.ssb.no/innvbef/tab-2007-05-24-11.html
  2. ^ Personer med innvandringsbakgrunn, etter innvandringskategori, landbakgrunn og kjønn. 1. januar 2012 Archived 2012-09-18 at the Wayback Machine SSB. Retrieved 6 December 2012
  3. ^ a b http://www.ssb.no/english/magazine/art-2006-10-13-02-en.html
  4. ^ "Etterlyste mer info om innvandrere og kriminalitet – svaret overrasker ikke SSB-forskerne". Aftenposten (in Norwegian Bokmål). Retrieved 2017-12-23.
  5. ^ Synøve N. Andersen, Bjart Holtsmark & Sigmund B. Mohn (2017). Kriminalitet blant innvandrere og norskfødte med innvandrerforeldre En analyse av registerdata for perioden 1992-2015. Statistics Norway. pp. 42, Figure 3.2. ISBN 978-82-537-9643-7.
  6. ^ Synøve N. Andersen, Bjart Holtsmark & Sigmund B. Mohn (2017). Kriminalitet blant innvandrere og norskfødte med innvandrerforeldre En analyse av registerdata for perioden 1992-2015. Statistics Norway. pp. 29–30, Figure 3.2. ISBN 978-82-537-9643-7.