J. W. Hampton, Jr., & Co. v. United States

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
J. W. Hampton, Jr., & Co. v. United States
Seal of the United States Supreme Court
Argued March 1, 1928
Decided April 9, 1928
Full case nameJ. W. Hampton, Jr. & Company v. United States
Citations276 U.S. 394 (more)
48 S. Ct. 348; 72 L. Ed. 624; 1928 U.S. LEXIS 284
Court membership
Chief Justice
William H. Taft
Associate Justices
Oliver W. Holmes Jr. · Willis Van Devanter
James C. McReynolds · Louis Brandeis
George Sutherland · Pierce Butler
Edward T. Sanford · Harlan F. Stone
Case opinion
MajorityTaft, joined by a unanimous court

J. W. Hampton, Jr. & Co. v. United States, 276 U.S. 394 (1928),[1] is a landmark[2][3] case in the United States in which the Supreme Court of the United States ruled that congressional delegation of legislative authority is an implied power of Congress that is constitutional so long as Congress provides an "intelligible principle" to guide the executive branch.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ J. W. Hampton, Jr., & Co. v. United States, 276 U.S. 394 (1928).
  2. ^ Mistretta v. United States, 488 U.S. 361, 515 (1989).
  3. ^ Massey, Calvin (2001). American Constitutional Law: Powers and Liberties. Aspen Law & Business. p. 416.

External links[edit]