John Dashiell

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John Dashiell
Born(1888-04-30)April 30, 1888
DiedMay 3, 1975(1975-05-03) (aged 87)
Known forPast president, American Psychological Association
Scientific career
FieldsPsychology
Doctoral advisorJohn Dewey

John Frederick Dashiell (April 30, 1888[1] – May 3, 1975) was an American psychologist and a past president of the American Psychological Association.

Biography[edit]

Dashiell was born in 1888 in Southport, Indiana. Early in his career, Dashiell taught at Waynesburg College, Princeton University, University of Minnesota and Oberlin College.[2]

Dashiell became a department head at the University of North Carolina. He was APA president in 1938. In his presidential address that year, he called for psychology to reconnect with philosophy for its methodology and logic.[3] He was president of the Society for the Teaching of Psychology in 1953-1954.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "On April 30". American Psychological Association. Retrieved November 12, 2014.
  2. ^ Wozniak, Robert. "John Frederick Dashiell and the Fundamentals of Objective Psychology". Bryn Mawr College. Retrieved November 12, 2014.
  3. ^ Smith, Laurence D. (1986). Behaviorism and Logical Positivism: A Reassessment of the Alliance. Stanford University Press. p. 206. ISBN 978-0-8047-1301-6.
  4. ^ "List of Division Officers, 1946-Present". Society for the Teaching of Psychology. Retrieved November 12, 2014.

External links[edit]