Juan Guzmán (baseball)

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Juan Guzmán
Juan Guzman - Knoxville Blue Jays - 1988.jpg
Guzman in 1988
Pitcher
Born: (1966-10-28) October 28, 1966 (age 52)
Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
June 7, 1991, for the Toronto Blue Jays
Last MLB appearance
April 7, 2000, for the Tampa Bay Devil Rays
MLB statistics
Win–loss record91–79
Earned run average4.08
Strikeouts1,243
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Juan Andres Guzmán Correa (born October 28, 1966) is a former pitcher in Major League Baseball. Guzman spent much of his playing career with the Toronto Blue Jays and was part of their World Series winning teams in 1992 and 1993.

Career[edit]

Guzmán was originally signed by the Los Angeles Dodgers as an amateur free agent in 1985. He pitched for the Blue Jays from 1991 to 1998, then played briefly for the Baltimore Orioles, Cincinnati Reds, and Tampa Bay Devil Rays, finishing with a career ERA of 4.08.

In his first three seasons with the Blue Jays, he went a combined 40–11 with a 3.28 ERA. The Jays made the playoffs all three years, winning the World Series in 1992 and 1993. Guzman won two games in both the 1992 and 1993 ALCS but was not able to secure a win in either World Series. His playoff record was 5–1 in eight starts with a 2.44 ERA.

Guzman had an ERA of 2.93 in 1996, the lowest in the American League among qualified pitchers.

Guzman had a very good fastball, striking out 7.5 batters per nine innings during his career. On the mound, his deliberate, slow approach earned him the nickname "Human Rain Delay" from Toronto fans. He led the American league in wild pitches in 1993 and 1994.

On July 31, 1999, Guzmán and cash were traded for B. J. Ryan and Jacobo Sequea.[1]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Dave Sheinin (August 1, 1999). "Orioles Trade Guzman". www.washingtonpost.com. The Washington Post. Retrieved August 3, 2019.

External links[edit]

Preceded by
Randy Johnson
AL hits per nine innings
1996
Succeeded by
Randy Johnson