KSDO

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KSDO
Radio Inspiración logo.png
CitySan Diego, California
Broadcast areaSan Diego County
Tijuana
BrandingRadio Inspiración
SloganAlimento para el alma
Frequency1130 (kHz)
First air dateJanuary 24, 1947[1]
FormatSpanish religious programming
Power10,000 watts
ClassB
Facility ID51166
Transmitter coordinates32°51′4″N 116°57′51″W / 32.85111°N 116.96417°W / 32.85111; -116.96417Coordinates: 32°51′4″N 116°57′51″W / 32.85111°N 116.96417°W / 32.85111; -116.96417
Callsign meaningK San DiegO
Former callsignsKYOR (1947–1949)[2]
OwnerHi-Favor Broadcasting, LLC
Sister stationsKEZY, KLTX
WebcastListen Live
Websitewww.radioinspiracion.com

KSDO is a radio station in San Diego, California, broadcasting at 1130 KHz with 10,000 watts of power. It is owned by Hi-Favor Broadcasting, and airs a Spanish Christian format branded "Radio Inspiración".

History[edit]

Early years[edit]

The station began broadcasting January 24, 1947, and held the call sign KYOR.[1][2] It was owned by Silver Gate Broadcasting, and ran 250 watts during daytime hours only.[1][2]

In 1949, the station was sold to San Diego Broadcasting for $75,000, and its call sign was changed to KSDO.[2][3] The new owners were required to divest themselves of one station, so KSDO suspended operations.[4] The station had a permit to increase daytime power and add nighttime operations, and San Diego Broadcasting intended to surrender the license of AM 1510 KUSN once construction of KSDO's new facilities was complete.[4] In 1950, the station resumed operations, with its daytime power increased to 5,000 watts and nighttime operations added, running 1,000 watts.[2]

In 1959, the station was sold to Gordon Broadcasting for $500,000.[5][2] The station aired a beautiful music format in the 1960s.[6][7]

News talk era[edit]

By the early 1970s, KSDO had adopted news-talk format.[8] In 1972, the station was sold to Generation II Radio San Diego, a subsidiary of Firestone Communications, for $2.5 million.[8][9] In 1976, the station was sold to Pacific and Southern, a subsidiary of Combined Communications, for $1,576,000.[10] Gannett purchased Combined Communications in 1979.[11] Its power was increased to 10,000 watts the same year.[2]

Laurence Gross hosted a midday talk show on KSDO from 1975 to 1983.[12] From 1986 to 1997, former San Diego mayor Roger Hedgecock hosted a program on the station.[13][14] Michael Reagan hosted a show from 1989 to 1992.[15][16] It was an affiliate of NBC Talknet in the 1980s.[17] Syndicated hosts on KSDO over the years included Rush Limbaugh, G. Gordon Liddy, Larry King, and Tom Leykis.[16][18][19] It was also the flagship station of the San Diego Chargers during its "Air Coryell" years.[20] As a talk station, KSDO's ratings were consistently among the top ten stations in San Diego, through 1996.[21][22]

In 1996, Gannett traded KSDO and five other stations to Jacor Communications for WTSP CBS 10 in Tampa.[23] In 1997, Roger Hedgecock and Rush Limbaugh were moved to KOGO, and the station switched to a financial news-talk format, with programming from Bloomberg and The Wall Street Journal.[14][24][25] Ray Lucia hosted middays, later moving to mornings.[25][26] Syndicated talk shows aired at night.[25] In 2000, syndicated talk programs replaced most financial programming.[27][26] Hosts included Michael Savage, Phil Hendrie, Lionel, and Larry King.[26] That year, the station was sold to Chase Radio Properties.[28] In late 2001, financial talk programming began to again make up the bulk of the station's daytime schedule.[29]

Spanish Christian era[edit]

In 2003, the station was sold to Hi-Favor Broadcasting for $10 million.[30][31][32][33] The station adopted a Spanish language Christian format as an affiliate of Radio Nueva Vida.[32][34] By 2019, the station had disaffiliated from Radio Nueva Vida, but continued to air a Spanish language Christian format as Radio Inspiración.[35]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "KYOR on Air", Broadcasting – Telecasting. January 27, 1947. p. 28. Retrieved May 26, 2019.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g History Cards for KSDO, fcc.gov. Retrieved May 26, 2019.
  3. ^ "FCC Roundup", Broadcasting – Telecasting. June 13, 1949. p. 62. Retrieved May 26, 2019.
  4. ^ a b "KYOR–KUSN Action", Broadcasting – Telecasting. July 11, 1949. p. 79. Retrieved May 26, 2019.
  5. ^ "Changing hands", Broadcasting. July 27, 1959. p. 54. Retrieved May 27, 2019.
  6. ^ "KSDO Hits 'Daily Double' as AM and FM Outlet", Billboard. March 19, 1966. pp. 20, 24. Retrieved May 27, 2019.
  7. ^ "KSDO's Bright and Beautiful Adult Sound Matches San Diego!", Broadcasting. September 15, 1969. p. 60. Retrieved May 27, 2019.
  8. ^ a b "Firestone acquires KSDO as first broadcast buy", Broadcasting. September 27, 1971. p. 54. Retrieved May 28, 2019.
  9. ^ "Approval for KDSO sale", Broadcasting. January 10, 1972. p. 8. Retrieved May 28, 2019.
  10. ^ "Changing Hands", Broadcasting. September 20, 1976. p. 43. Retrieved May 28, 2019.
  11. ^ Holsendolph, Ernest. "Takeover By Gannett Complete", The New York Times. June 8, 1979. Retrieved May 29, 2019.
  12. ^ Bornstein, Rollye. "Vox Jox", Billboard. March 12, 1983. p. 22. Retrieved May 28, 2019.
  13. ^ Shroder-Murray, Susan. "Ousted ex-mayor new talk show host", United Press International. January 20, 1986. Retrieved May 29, 2019.
  14. ^ a b Arnold, Thomas K. "Why Did They Fire John Coleman?", San Diego Reader. April 10, 1997. Retrieved May 29, 2019.
  15. ^ Brass, Kevin. "Michael Reagan Opens the Mike and Guess Who Calls?", Los Angeles Times. January 17, 1989. Retrieved May 29, 2019.
  16. ^ a b Brass, Kevin. "KSDO Replaces Michael Reagan With Rush Limbaugh", Los Angeles Times. January 30, 1992. Retrieved May 29, 2019.
  17. ^ Bornstein, Rollye. "Vox Jox", Billboard. July 16, 1983. p. 25. Retrieved May 29, 2019.
  18. ^ "Format Changes", The M Street Journal. Vol. 10, No. 24. June 16, 1993. p. 1. Retrieved May 29, 2019.
  19. ^ "Format Changes & Updates", The M Street Journal. Vol. 11, No. 19. May 11, 1994. p. 1. Retrieved May 29, 2019.
  20. ^ "San Diego Chargers play-by-play announcer Tom Kelly has been...", United Press International. March 2, 1983. Retrieved May 29, 2019.
  21. ^ Arnold, Thomas K. "KOGO Switching To News/Talk", Billboard. September 24, 1983. p. 15. Retrieved May 29, 2019.
  22. ^ Duncan, James H. "San Diego: 12+ Metro Share", An American Radio Trilogy 1975 to 2004. Volume 1: The Markets. Duncan's American Radio. Retrieved May 29, 2019.
  23. ^ Taylor, Chuck. "Vox Jox", Billboard. October 5, 1996. p. 101. Retrieved May 29, 2019.
  24. ^ "Format Changes & Updates", The M Street Journal. Vol. 14, No. 19. May 14, 1997. p. 1. Retrieved May 29, 2019.
  25. ^ a b c "Programming Schedule". KSDO. Archived from the original on August 25, 1999. Retrieved May 29, 2019.
  26. ^ a b c "KSDO 1130 – Talk Radio for San Diego". KSDO. Archived from the original on June 16, 2000. Retrieved May 29, 2019.
  27. ^ "Format Changes & Updates", The M Street Journal. Vol. 17, No. 18. May 3, 2000. p. 1. Retrieved May 29, 2019.
  28. ^ "Clear Channel spins, cont'd", Broadcasting & Cable. May 15, 2000. p. 57. Retrieved May 29, 2019.
  29. ^ "KSDO 1130 – Talk Radio for San Diego". KSDO. Archived from the original on October 20, 2001. Retrieved May 29, 2019.
  30. ^ "Hinz Chases down another SoCal AM", Radio Business Report. Volume 19, Issue 120. December 26, 2002. Retrieved May 29, 2019.
  31. ^ "Transactions at a Glance", Radio & Records. January 3, 2003. p. 6. Retrieved May 29, 2019.
  32. ^ a b Arnold, Thomas K. "The Insider", San Diego Magazine. May 2003. Retrieved May 29, 2019.
  33. ^ Application Search Details – BAL-20021220ADW, fcc.gov. Retrieved May 29, 2019.
  34. ^ "Nasdaq Puts Salem On Notice About Board Makeup", InsideRadio. December 19, 2018. Retrieved May 29, 2019.
  35. ^ "Radio Inspiración 1390 AM". KLTX. Archived from the original on May 26, 2019. Retrieved May 29, 2019.

External links[edit]