This is a good article. Follow the link for more information.

Katie Joplin

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Katie Joplin
An image with two photos (one of a man and another of a woman next to a young boy). The two images are placed against a pale green background with yellow and red boxes framing them.
Title card
GenreSitcom
Created by
  • Tom Seeley
  • Norm Gunzenhauser
Starring
Country of originUnited States
Original language(s)English
No. of seasons1
No. of episodes7 (2 unaired) (list of episodes)
Production
Running time30 minutes
Production company(s)Warner Bros. Television
Release
Original networkThe WB
Original releaseAugust 9 (1999-08-09) –
September 6, 1999 (1999-09-06)

Katie Joplin is an American television sitcom created by Tom Seeley and Norm Gunzenhauser that aired for one season on The WB Television Network (The WB) from August 9, 1999 to September 6, 1999. It was produced by Warner Bros. Television. The show revolves around the titular character (Park Overall), who hosts a Philadelphia radio program about relationship advice. Storylines also focus on her relationship with her 14-year-old son Greg (Jesse Head).

The series was initially optioned as a mid-season replacement for the 1998–1999 television season, but it was delayed for a year due to production issues. Katie Joplin attracted the lowest viewership for any original programming that the WB aired during its time slot. The series received a mixed response from television critics.

Premise and characters[edit]

The series revolves around the titular character (Park Overall), who moves from Knoxville, Tennessee to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.[1] She is a single mother to her 14-year-old son Greg (Jesse Head), and has an estranged relationship with her husband Jerry.[1][2] While in Knoxville, she was disappointed with her job in a bottling plant, where she worked 16 hours a day.[2] Traveling to Philadelphia to track down her husband and secure a better career,[2][3] she moves in with her more fashionable niece Liz Berlin (Ana Reeder).[1] She initially works for the Crescent Corset Company and later Car City, and her son attends Benjamin Franklin High School.[2]

Katie has a positive first impression with WLBP-FM's general manager Glen Shotz (Jay Thomas) while trying to sell him a car.[1][2] Characterized through "her perception, Southern wit, and strong opinions", Katie is hired to host a phone-in radio program.[1][2] It is a six-hour overnight show titled The Katie Joplin Show,[2] in which she gives advice on love.[4] Thomas approached his character from a sympathetic viewpoint; he explained: "I'm trying to make this guy more human than any general manager I've ever had."[5] Program director Mitchell Tuit (Jim Rash) dislikes Katie as he opposes a talk show airing on his primarily rock and roll station. In an attempt to sabotage the program, he pairs her with the inexperienced producer Tiger French (Simon Rex).[1] Glen's teenage daughter Sara Shotz (Majandra Delfino) is a recurring character on the show, appearing in three episodes.[6][7] Storylines frequently revolve around Katie's attempt to balance her career and her relationship with her son.[2]

Production and broadcast history[edit]

Tom Seeley and Norm Gunzenhauser created and executively produced Katie Joplin.[8][9] It was produced by Warner Bros. Television.[9] The WB Television Network (The WB) had originally optioned Katie Joplin as a mid-season replacement for the 1998–1999 television season; it was considered alongside Zoe, Duncan, Jack and Jane, Baby Blues, and Movie Stars as part of the network's Sunday line-up.[10] Overall had pitched Katie Joplin to the WB in 1998 as part of a presentation.[11] While promoting the series, she described said that it "brings the mountain spirit and mountain wisdom to the city of brotherly love".[12] Developed under the working titles Untitled Park Overall Project,You're With Kate, and Citizen Kate,[4][13][14] the show was delayed to the following year due to unspecified production issues.[12][15]

Broadcast on Monday nights at 9:30 pm EST,[3] each episode lasts 30 minutes with commercials.[1] The series carried a TV-PG rating for suggestive dialogue and coarse or crude language.[16] It premiered on August 9, 1999, and the final episode aired on September 6, 1999.[1] Katie Joplin received the lowest ratings for any original programming that the WB aired in the time slot; television writer Richard Irvin cited it as one of 150 television sitcoms you probably never saw.[17] Prior to the show's debut, Rob Owen, writing for the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, referenced the show as scheduled for a "short run".[18]

Episodes[edit]

No.TitleDirected byWritten byOriginal air dateUS viewers
(millions)
1"I'd Rather Be in Philadelphia"Steve ZuckermanNorm Gunzenhauser and Tom SeeleyAugust 9, 1999 (1999-08-09)[6]2.4/4[19]
While pursuing her husband to Philadelphia, Katie Joplin receives a job as a radio show host after impressing the station's general manager Glen Shotz.
2"Charcoaled Gray"Steve ZuckermanAmy Engelberg and Wendy EngelbergAugust 16, 1999 (1999-08-16)[6]
Katie's son Greg gets detention after refusing a burnt sandwich from the cafeteria. After Katie shares his story on her radio show, Greg is bullied by two students. Meanwhile, Katie steals program director Mitchell Tuit's leather office chair.
3"Promotion Commotion"Steve ZuckermanBill KunstlerAugust 23, 1999 (1999-08-23)[6]1.1/2[20]
Katie's radio show gets a national sponsor and becomes the subject of a promotional campaign. While Katie is distracted at work, Greg faces peer pressure from his new friends. At the radio station, producer Tiger French is uncomfortable with romantic advances from Glen's 16-year-old daughter Sara.
4"Parent Trap"Howard MurrayMarc FlanaganAugust 30, 1999 (1999-08-30)[6]1.7/3[21]
Glen hires Sara to work at the radio station, but Katie is angry when he refuses to discipline her. After spending a lot of money with their joint credit cards, Katie has trouble with her finances.
5"Kill the Messenger"Howard MurrayMichael BornhorstSeptember 6, 1999 (1999-09-06)[6]
Katie discovers that Tiger has been secretly dating Sara. While preparing for a Bar Mitzvah, Greg turns to Katie's niece Liz Berlin for advice.
6"We're Not in Tennessee Anymore, Toto"TBATBAUnaired
7"Tiger's Choice"TBATBAUnaired

Critical reception[edit]

Katie Joplin received a mixed response from television critics. Prior to its debut, a TV Guide contributor selected Katie Joplin as "the Critic's Choice for Monday evening viewing",[12] and Rob Owen recommended it for fans of Overall.[18] Criticizing the show as a failure, Radio World's Stephen Winzenburg felt its premise about a middle-age woman receiving a radio host position without any experience on the format was unrealistic.[22]

References[edit]

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h Brooks & Marsh (2009): pp. 729
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h Terrace (2008): pp. 557-558
  3. ^ a b "Don't Touch That Dial". Kitsap Sun. August 9, 1999. Archived from the original on August 5, 2018.
  4. ^ a b Pierce, Scott D. (May 20, 1998). "The WB adds Thursday nights and 4 new series". Deseret News. Archived from the original on August 5, 2018.
  5. ^ Beck, Marilyn; Smith, Stacy Jenel (October 5, 1998). "Diamond Polishing His New Act Before Taking It Out on the Road". Los Angeles Daily News. Retrieved August 5, 2018.
  6. ^ a b c d e f "Episodes". TV Guide. Archived from the original on August 6, 2018.
  7. ^ Burnett (2002): p. 47
  8. ^ Niedt, Bob (October 13, 2011). "Casting begins for 'Upstate,' a pilot episode of a proposed TV series to be set and filmed in Syracuse". The Post-Standard. Archived from the original on January 17, 2012.
  9. ^ a b Morrison, Pamela (August 3, 1999). "The WB's New Comedy Katie Joplin Completes the Summer Season". WarnerMedia. Archived from the original on August 6, 2018.
  10. ^ Hontz, Jenny (May 19, 1998). "'Creek' tweak in WB's sked". Variety. Archived from the original on March 5, 2016.
  11. ^ Beck, Marilyn; Smith, Stacy Jenel (April 1, 1998). "'Seinfeld' Finale Could Close New York's 42nd Street". Los Angeles Daily News. Archived from the original on August 6, 2018.(subscription required)
  12. ^ a b c "New Park Overall TV Show,'Katie Joplin,' Premieres Monday". The Greeneville Sun. August 7, 1999. Retrieved August 5, 2018.
  13. ^ Schneider, Schneider (May 11, 1998). "Network Pilots Run from 'Quirky' to 'Hollyweird'". Advertising Age. Archived from the original on August 5, 2018.
  14. ^ Beck, Marilyn; Smith, Stacy Jenel (June 15, 1998). "McRee Bonds with Mom of School Shooting Suspect". Los Angeles Daily News. Archived from the original on August 6, 2018. (subscription required)
  15. ^ Beck, Marilyn; Smith, Stacy Jenel (November 30, 1998). "Taking 'Bulworth' by the Horns". Los Angeles Daily News. Archived from the original on August 5, 2018. (subscription required)
  16. ^ "'Moesha' spin-off: Hilarious, or just too painful to watch?". The Standard-Times. August 30, 1999. Archived from the original on August 5, 2018.
  17. ^ Irvin (2016)
  18. ^ a b Owen, Rob (August 8, 1999). "Hot Ticket". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Archived from the original on August 6, 2018.
  19. ^ Bierbaum, Tom (August 11, 1999). "Eye moves past NBC in homes". Variety. Retrieved August 6, 2018.
  20. ^ "People's Choice". Broadcasting & Cable. September 6, 1999. Archived from the original on July 25, 2018. (subscription required)
  21. ^ "People's Choice" (PDF). Broadcasting & Cable. September 13, 1999. Retrieved August 5, 2018.
  22. ^ Winzenburg, Stephen (September 18, 2011). "Do You Remember 'Talk to Me'?". Radio World. Archived from the original on August 6, 2018.

Book sources[edit]

External links[edit]