King's Lynn Stadium

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Adrian Flux Arena
Kings Lynn Stadium
NorfolkArena.jpg
LocationSaddlebow Road, King's Lynn, Norfolk
Coordinates52°43′48″N 0°23′20″E / 52.73000°N 0.38889°E / 52.73000; 0.38889
Opened1951

King's Lynn Stadium, also known as the Adrian Flux Arena and previously as the Norfolk Arena, is a short oval stadium situated to the south of King's Lynn on Saddlebow Road in Norfolk County, England. It currently hosts BriSCA Formula 1 Stock Car Racing, Banger Racing, motorcycle speedway and is also a former greyhound racing track.[1]

Origins[edit]

The stadium was constructed in 1951 on the west side of Saddlebow Road next door to a poultry farm.[2] It originally opened for greyhound racing.

Stock car racing[edit]

Since 1955 it has hosted BriSCA Formula 1 Stock Car Racing for which it has hosted World Final events for in 2007, 2009, 2013, 2015 and 2019. It's set to hold the World Final again in September 2020 with this year's winner Tom Harris defending his title.[3][4][5]

Speedway[edit]

The stadium has been the home of the King's Lynn Stars speedway team since 1965. It hosted the Final of the 1984 European (World) Under-21 Championship won by England's Marvyn Cox.[6]

The shale-surfaced track is 342 metres (374 yards) long and is surrounded by a solid steel plate fence and like most international speedway venues, the fences in the turns are protected by an air fence.[7]

Greyhound racing[edit]

Racing started on 27 August 1951 and was independent (not affiliated to the sports governing body the National Greyhound Racing Club).[8][9] The racing is believed to have ended sometime during 1966.

Other uses[edit]

Other short oval formulas such as Banger Racing also appear regularly at the track and the stadium also hosts drifting and stunt events.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Official Website". Adrian Flux Arena.
  2. ^ "OS Plan 1966". old-maps.co.uk.
  3. ^ "Official BriSCA website". Brisca.
  4. ^ "World Final information". F1stockcars.com.
  5. ^ "World Final Statistics". BriSCAF1stox.com.
  6. ^ "Kings Lynn programme 1952". National Speedway Museum.
  7. ^ "Adrian Flux Arena". King's Lynn Speedway.
  8. ^ Barnes, Julia (1988). Daily Mirror Greyhound Fact File. Ringpress Books. p. 418. ISBN 0-948955-15-5.
  9. ^ "King's Lynn Greyhound Stadium". Greyhound Derby.com.

Coordinates: 52°43′48.58″N 0°23′20.96″E / 52.7301611°N 0.3891556°E / 52.7301611; 0.3891556