Knödel number

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In number theory, an n-Knödel number for a given positive integer n is a composite number m with the property that each i < m coprime to m satisfies . The concept is named after Walter Knödel.

The set of all n-Knödel numbers is denoted Kn. The special case K1 represents the Carmichael numbers.

Every composite number m is a n-Knödel number for .

Examples[edit]

n Kn
1 {561, 1105, 1729, 2465, 2821, 6601, ... } (sequence A002997 in the OEIS)
2 {4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 22, 24, 26, ... } (sequence A050990 in the OEIS)
3 {9, 15, 21, 33, 39, 51, 57, 63, 69, ... } (sequence A033553 in the OEIS)
4 {6, 8, 12, 16, 20, 24, 28, 40, 44, ... } (sequence A050992 in the OEIS)

Literature[edit]

  • Makowski, A (1963). Generalization of Morrow's D-Numbers. p. 71.
  • Ribenboim, Paulo (1989). The New Book of Prime Number Records. New York: Springer-Verlag. p. 101. ISBN 978-0-387-94457-9.
  • Weisstein, Eric W. "Knödel Numbers". MathWorld.