Lac qui Parle County, Minnesota

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Lac qui Parle County, Minnesota
LacquiParleCC.jpg
Map of Minnesota highlighting Lac qui Parle County
Location within the U.S. state of Minnesota
Map of the United States highlighting Minnesota
Minnesota's location within the U.S.
Founded6 March 1871[1]
Named for"Lake that speaks" French
SeatMadison
Largest cityMadison
Area
 • Total778 sq mi (2,015 km2)
 • Land765 sq mi (1,981 km2)
 • Water13 sq mi (34 km2), 1.7%
Population (est.)
 • (2017)6,685
 • Density8.74/sq mi (3.37/km2)
Congressional district7th
Time zoneCentral: UTC−6/−5
Websitelqpco.com

Lac qui Parle County is a county in the U.S. state of Minnesota. As of the 2010 United States Census, the population was 7,259.[2] Its county seat is Madison.[3]

History[edit]

The name of the county is French for "lake which talks."

In 1862 the Minnesota legislature authorized creation of a county to be called Lac qui Parle on an area north of the Minnesota River. However, that initiative was not approved by the local voters affected, so the proposed county did not come into existence. Nine years later (6 March 1871) the legislature authorized creation of the present Lac qui Parle County, south of the Minnesota River, and it was approved by local voters. The county seat was established at Lac qui Parle village.

In 1884 a settlement was platted at the railway stop in Madison Township (named for Madison, Wisconsin). The settlement, also named Madison, was incorporated in 1885, and in 1889 the county government was moved from Lac qui Parle village to this new town, which incorporated as a city in 1902.[4]

The county courthouse was built in Madison in 1899, and in 1903 the Madison City Hall was completed. A total of four fires swept the city's main area during the early years of the twentieth century, resulting in most wood structures in the area being replaced with brick buildings.[5].

A March 2011 study by the University of Wisconsin–Madison and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation ranked this as Minnesota's healthiest county.[6][7]

The county reached its peak population of 15,554 in 1920. However, the county seat continued its population growth until 1960, when 2,380 residents were counted.[5]

Geography[edit]

Madison County is on the west side of Minnesota. Its west border abuts the east border of the state of South Dakota. The Minnesota River flows southeastward along the county's NE border, creating Marsh Lake and Lac qui Parle Reservoir[8] The Minnesota River flow is augmented by Yellow Bank River near the county's north corner, and by Lac qui Parle River near the county's east border. The south fork of the Yellow Bank flows northward through the west portion of the county, and meets the north fork of the Yellow Bank in the north end of the county; the combined flow discharges into the Minnesota at the county's NE border. The Lac qui Parle flows eastward through the lower portion of the county, discharging into the Minnesota near the community of Lac qui Parle.

The county terrain consists of rolling hills, knolls and short bluffs near the west end, running to a steep bluff overlooking the Minnesota River valley on its east border. The area is largely devoted to agriculture.[9] The terrain slopes to the north and east, with its highest point near its SW corner, at 1,404' (428m) ASL.[10] The county has a total area of 778 square miles (2,020 km2), of which 765 square miles (1,980 km2) is land and 13 square miles (34 km2) (1.7%) is water.[11]

The county's northern boundary is defined by the Minnesota River. Two tributaries, the Lac qui Parle River and the Yellow Bank River, flow through the county to discharge into the Minnesota.[12]

Soils of Lac Qui Parle County[13]

Lakes[9][edit]

  • Bolland Slough
  • Case Lake
  • Flinks Slough (part)
  • Kibler Lake
  • Lac qui Parle (adjacent to county)
  • Marsh Lake (adjacent to county)
  • Mud Lake
  • Pegg Lake
  • Salt Lake (part)
  • Swanson Lake

Major highways[edit]

Adjacent counties[edit]

Protected areas[9][edit]

  • Acton Marsh State Wildlife Management Area
  • Big Stone National Wildlife Refuge (part)
  • Borchardt-Rosin State Wildlife Management Area
  • Church State Wildlife Management Area
  • De Vorak State Wildlife Management Area
  • Flinks State Wildlife Management Area
  • Haydenville State Wildlife Management Area
  • Kemen State Wildlife Management Area
  • Kibler Scientific and Natural Area
  • Lac qui Parle State Park
  • Medicine Pipe State Wildlife Management Area
  • Plantation State Wildlife Management Area
  • Providence State Wildlife Management Area
  • Sweetwater State Wildlife Management Area
  • Wild Wings Baxter State Wildlife Management Area
  • Yellow Bank Hills Scientific and Natural Area

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1870145
18804,8913,273.1%
189010,382112.3%
190014,28937.6%
191015,4358.0%
192015,5540.8%
193015,398−1.0%
194015,5090.7%
195014,545−6.2%
196013,330−8.4%
197011,164−16.2%
198010,592−5.1%
19908,924−15.7%
20008,067−9.6%
20107,259−10.0%
Est. 20176,685[14]−7.9%
US Decennial Census[15]
1790-1960[16] 1900-1990[17]
1990-2000[18] 2010-2016[2]
Age pyramid of county residents based on 2000 US census data

2000 census[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census, there were 8,067 people, 3,316 households, and 2,225 families in the county. The population density was 10.5/sqmi (4.07/km²). There were 3,774 housing units at an average density of 4.93/sqmi (1.90/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 98.85% White, 0.16% Black or African American, 0.22% Native American, 0.32% Asian, 0.06% from other races, and 0.38% from two or more races. 0.26% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 44.6% were of Norwegian and 35.2% German ancestry.

There were 3,316 households out of which 27.90% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.80% were married couples living together, 4.10% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.90% were non-families. 30.20% of all households were made up of individuals and 17.90% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.37 and the average family size was 2.96.

The county population contained 24.50% under the age of 18, 5.70% from 18 to 24, 22.70% from 25 to 44, 23.90% from 45 to 64, and 23.20% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43 years. For every 100 females there were 98.60 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.60 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $32,626, and the median income for a family was $41,556. Males had a median income of $27,939 versus $19,681 for females. The per capita income for the county was $17,399. About 5.60% of families and 8.50% of the population were below the poverty line, including 7.80% of those under age 18 and 9.20% of those age 65 or over.

Communities[edit]

Cities[edit]

Unincorporated communities[edit]

Townships[edit]

Politics[edit]

Lac qui Parle County voters have usually voted Democratic in the past several decades. In 78% of national elections since 1980, the county selected the Democratic Party candidate (as of 2016).

Presidential election results
Presidential elections results[19]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2016 59.4% 2,293 33.8% 1,305 6.8% 262
2012 48.6% 1,938 49.6% 1,974 1.8% 72
2008 45.6% 1,912 51.5% 2,160 2.9% 120
2004 46.1% 2,093 52.6% 2,390 1.3% 58
2000 43.6% 1,941 50.4% 2,244 6.0% 268
1996 32.4% 1,447 54.2% 2,420 13.4% 598
1992 28.9% 1,435 47.1% 2,342 24.0% 1,191
1988 42.5% 2,116 56.3% 2,805 1.2% 62
1984 49.7% 2,731 48.8% 2,685 1.5% 81
1980 50.5% 2,981 41.6% 2,457 7.9% 465
1976 37.8% 2,292 60.1% 3,647 2.1% 126
1972 48.4% 2,773 49.7% 2,845 1.9% 108
1968 45.9% 2,672 50.4% 2,937 3.8% 219
1964 36.2% 2,236 63.7% 3,934 0.2% 10
1960 49.4% 3,185 50.4% 3,253 0.2% 11
1956 53.6% 3,276 46.3% 2,826 0.1% 6
1952 58.5% 3,924 41.1% 2,753 0.4% 28
1948 38.2% 2,330 60.5% 3,690 1.3% 80
1944 52.6% 3,104 47.1% 2,779 0.3% 17
1940 54.7% 3,789 44.9% 3,106 0.4% 28
1936 34.5% 2,066 54.1% 3,243 11.5% 687
1932 31.9% 1,911 66.5% 3,992 1.6% 97
1928 59.7% 3,406 39.3% 2,245 1.0% 59
1924 52.3% 2,860 1.9% 106 45.8% 2,507
1920 82.3% 4,219 12.7% 653 5.0% 255
1916 56.3% 1,614 36.5% 1,047 7.2% 206
1912 13.5% 343 24.0% 608 62.5% 1,587
1908 69.2% 1,894 24.1% 661 6.7% 183
1904 83.3% 1,886 10.7% 243 6.0% 136
1900 71.5% 1,924 23.9% 642 4.7% 126
1896 61.3% 1,620 35.3% 932 3.4% 89
1892 52.3% 1,164 20.5% 457 27.1% 604

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Minnesota Place Names". Minnesota Historical Society. Retrieved March 18, 2014.
  2. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on July 13, 2011. Retrieved September 1, 2013.
  3. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 7 June 2011.
  4. ^ Warren Upham (1920). Minnesota Geographic Names: Their Origin and Historic Significance. Minnesota Historical Society. pp. 288–290.
  5. ^ a b Madison (city) website (accessed 18 March 2019)
  6. ^ Wobbema, Taryn (March 29, 2011). "How healthy are Minnesotans? It varies, report says". Star Tribune. Retrieved 19 September 2018.
  7. ^ "Rankings". County Health Rankings & Roadmaps. Retrieved 19 September 2018.
  8. ^ The reservoir was created by damming the Minnesota River in 1939. The dam was rebuilt in 1996.
  9. ^ a b c Lac Qui Parle County MN Google Maps (accessed 18 March 2019)
  10. ^ "Find an Altitude/Lac qui Parle County MN" Google Maps (accessed 18 March 2019)
  11. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". US Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Archived from the original on September 21, 2013. Retrieved October 21, 2014.
  12. ^ Minnesota Atlas & Gazetteer. Yarmouth ME: DeLorme. 1994. pp. 36–37. ISBN 0-89933-222-6.
  13. ^ Nelson, Steven (2011). Savanna Soils of Minnesota. Minnesota: Self. pp. 69-70. ISBN 978-0-615-50320-2.
  14. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved 6 March 2019.
  15. ^ "US Decennial Census". US Census Bureau. Retrieved October 21, 2014.
  16. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved October 21, 2014.
  17. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". US Census Bureau. Retrieved October 21, 2014.
  18. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). US Census Bureau. Retrieved October 21, 2014.
  19. ^ Leip, David. "Atlas of US Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved 19 September 2018.

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 45°00′N 96°11′W / 45.00°N 96.18°W / 45.00; -96.18