Legislative districts of Cavite

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The Legislative Districts of Cavite are the representations of the province of Cavite in the various national legislatures of the Philippines. The province is currently represented in the lower house of the Congress of the Philippines through its first, second, third, fourth, fifth, sixth, seventh and eighth districts.

From 2010 to 2018, the component city of Dasmariñas, while remaining an integral part of province, was granted its own congressional representation by nomenclature. This was officially repealed when the latest reapportionment bill was signed into law, thus reverting it back to its numerical representation as the fourth district of Cavite.

History[edit]

Cavite initially comprised a single assembly district in 1907. When seats for the upper house of the Philippine Legislature were elected from territory-based districts between 1916 and 1935, the province formed part of the fifth senatorial district which elected two out of the 24-member senate.

In the disruption caused by the Second World War, two delegates represented the province in the National Assembly of the Japanese-sponsored Second Philippine Republic: one was the provincial governor (an ex officio member), while the other was elected through a provincial assembly of KALIBAPI members during the Japanese occupation of the Philippines. Cavite City, being a chartered city, was represented separately in this short-lived legislative body. Tagaytay, the province's other chartered city, was placed under provincial jurisdiction during the war and was not represented separately. Upon the restoration of the Philippine Commonwealth in 1945, the province and its two cities reverted to the pre-war lone district representation.

The province was represented in the Interim Batasang Pambansa as part of Region IV-A from 1978 to 1984, and returned three representatives, elected at large, to the Regular Batasang Pambansa in 1984. Cavite was reapportioned into three congressional districts under the new Constitution[1] which was proclaimed on February 11, 1987, and elected members to the restored House of Representatives starting that same year.

The passage of Republic Act No. 9727[2] on October 22, 2009 increased the number of the province's representatives from three to seven, starting in the 2010 elections. However, the conversion of Dasmariñas into a city has resulted in an additional legal name for the fourth district, which became the Lone District of Dasmariñas after the ratification of Republic Act No. 9723[3] on November 25, 2009.

Meanwhile, despite the conversion of Bacoor and Imus into cities in 2012, their charters explicitly indicate the retention of their numerical designations as the second[4] and third districts[5] of the province.

Republic Act No. 11069, signed into law on September 17, 2018, reapportioned Cavite into eight legislative districts — the most for any province — by creating a separate legislative district for the newly converted city of General Trias.[6] This effectively supersedes RA No. 9723 and confirms the sole legal designation of the congressional district of Dasmariñas as the fourth district of Cavite.

1st District[edit]

Period Representative
15th Congress
2010–2013
Joseph Emilio A. Abaya[a]
16th Congress
2013–2016
Francis Gerald A. Abaya
17th Congress
2016–2019
18th Congress
2019–2022

Notes:

  1. ^ Assumed office as Secretary of Transportation and Communications on October 18, 2012.

1987–2010[edit]

Period Representative
8th Congress
1987–1992
Leonardo L. Guerrero
9th Congress
1992–1995
Dominador G. Nazareno, Jr.
10th Congress
1995–1998
Plaridel M. Abaya
11th Congress
1998–2001
12th Congress
2001–2004
13th Congress
2004–2007
Joseph Emilio A. Abaya
14th Congress
2007–2010

2nd District[edit]

Period Representative
15th Congress
2010–2013
Jesusa Victoria Hernandez Bautista
16th Congress
2013–2016
17th Congress
2016–2019
Strike B. Revilla
18th Congress
2019–2022

1987–2010[edit]

Period Representative
8th Congress
1987–1992
Renato P. Dragon
9th Congress
1992–1995
10th Congress
1995–1998
11th Congress
1998–2001
Erineo Maliksi
12th Congress
2001–2004
Gilbert Remulla
13th Congress
2004–2007
14th Congress
2007–2010
Elpidio F. Barzaga, Jr.

3rd District[edit]

  • City: Imus (became city in 2012)
  • Population (2015): 403,785
Period Representative
15th Congress
2010–2013
Erineo Maliksi
16th Congress
2013–2016
Alexander L. Advincula
17th Congress
2016–2019
18th Congress
2019–2022

1987–2010[edit]

Period Representative
8th Congress
1987–1992
Jorge A. Nuñez
9th Congress
1992–1995
Telesforo A. Unas
10th Congress
1995–1998
11th Congress
1998–2001
Napoleon R. Beratio[a]
12th Congress
2001–2004
13th Congress
2004–2007
Jesus Crispin C. Remulla
14th Congress
2007–2010

Notes

  1. ^ Died on August 6, 2002; position remained vacant until the end of the 12th Congress.

4th District[edit]

Period Representative
15th Congress
2010–2013
Elpidio F. Barzaga, Jr.
16th Congress
2013–2016
17th Congress
2016–2019
Jennifer A. Barzaga
18th Congress
2019–2022
Elpidio F. Barzaga, Jr.

5th District[edit]

Period Representative
15th Congress
2010–2013
Roy M. Loyola
16th Congress
2013–2016
17th Congress
2016–2019
18th Congress
2019–2022
Dahlia A. Loyola

6th District[edit]

Period Representative
18th Congress
2019–2022
Luis A. Ferrer IV

2010–2019[edit]

Period Representative
15th Congress
2010–2013
Antonio A. Ferrer
16th Congress
2013–2016
Luis A. Ferrer IV
17th Congress
2016–2019

7th District[edit]

Period Representative
18th Congress
2019–2022
Jesus Crispin C. Remulla

2010–2019[edit]

Period Representative
15th Congress
2010–2013
Jesus Crispin C. Remulla
16th Congress
2013–2016
Abraham Ng Tolentino
17th Congress
2016–2019

8th District[edit]

Period Representative
18th Congress
2019–2022
Abraham Ng Tolentino

Lone District (defunct)[edit]

Period Representative
1st Philippine Legislature
1907–1909
Rafael Palma
2nd Philippine Legislature
1909–1912
Emiliano Tria Tirona
3rd Philippine Legislature
1912–1916
Florentino Joya
4th Philippine Legislature
1916–1919
Emiliano Tria Tirona
5th Philippine Legislature
1919–1922
Emilio F. Virata
6th Philippine Legislature
1922–1925
Pedro P. Espiritu
7th Philippine Legislature
1925–1928
Antero Soriano
8th Philippine Legislature
1928–1931
Fidel Ibañez
9th Philippine Legislature
1931–1934
Emiliano Tria Tirona
10th Philippine Legislature
1934–1935
Francisco Arca
1st National Assembly
1935–1938
Justiniano S. Montano
2nd National Assembly
1938–1941
3rd National Assembly
1941–1946
1st Congress
1946–1949
2nd Congress
1949–1953
Manuel S. Rojas
3rd Congress
1953–1957
Jose T. Cajulis
4th Congress
1957–1961
Justiniano S. Montano
5th Congress
1961–1965
6th Congress
1965–1969
7th Congress
1969–1972

At-Large (defunct)[edit]

1943–1944[edit]

Period Representatives
National Assembly
1943–1944
Emiliano Tria Tirona[7]
Luis Y. Ferrer (ex officio)[7]

1984–1986[edit]

Period Representative
Regular Batasang Pambansa
1984–1986
Helena Zoila T. Benitez
Renato P. Dragon
Cesar E.A. Virata

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ 1986 Constitutional Commission (February 2, 1987). "1987 Constitution of the Philippines - Apportionment Ordinance". Retrieved June 13, 2016.
  2. ^ Congress of the Philippines (October 22, 2009). "Republic Act No. 9727" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on February 21, 2012. Retrieved June 13, 2016.
  3. ^ Congress of the Philippines (October 15, 2009). "Republic Act No. 9723" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on June 11, 2016. Retrieved June 13, 2016.
  4. ^ Congress of the Philippines (April 10, 2012). "Republic Act No. 10160". Retrieved June 13, 2016.
  5. ^ Congress of the Philippines (April 10, 2012). "Republic Act No. 10161". Retrieved June 13, 2016.
  6. ^ Congress of the Philippines (August 23, 2018). "Republic Act No. 11069". Retrieved July 22, 2019.
  7. ^ a b Official program of the inauguration of the Republic of the Philippines and the induction into office of His Excellency Jose P. Laurel. Bureau of Printing. 1943.