Lieutenant-Governor of New South Wales

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Lieutenant-Governor of New South Wales
Badge of the Governor of New South Wales.svg
Badge of the Governor of New South Wales
Incumbent
Tom Bathurst
AC, QC

since 1 February 2012
Office of the Governor
Executive Council of New South Wales
StyleHis Excellency The Honourable[1]
Member ofSupreme Court of New South Wales
NominatorPremier of New South Wales
AppointerAustralian monarch
Term lengthAt Her Majesty's pleasure
WebsiteOffice of the Governor

The Lieutenant-Governor of New South Wales is a government position in the state of New South Wales, Australia, acting as a deputy to the Governor of New South Wales. The office was first created in October 1786, before the arrival of the First Fleet, to act as a deputy to the first governor, Arthur Phillip. At that time the Lieutenant-Governor, or its equivalent of "Administrator of the Government", was filled by military officers and was a position only created when needed or in times of long absences by the Governor. Since 1872 this office has been held concurrently by the Chief Justice of New South Wales but the position may be retained by the Chief Justice after their retirement from the Supreme Court of New South Wales.

Role[edit]

Originally, the lieutenant-governor had a legislative role with a seat on the first Legislative Council of New South Wales in 1824; this was later phased out due to the lessening of the powers of the state governor. The role of the governors are enshrined in part 2A of the New South Wales Constitution Act (1902). The office itself has no standing powers but holds a dormant commission to act in the governor's position when needed.[2]

The current role of the lieutenant-governor is to take up the duties of the governor if the governor dies, resigns, or is absent such as in September 2008, when, in the absence of Governor Marie Bashir, the Lieutenant-Governor, James Spigelman, administered the swearing in of the new cabinet of the Nathan Rees government.[3]

If the Lieutenant-Governor becomes incapacitated while serving in the office of governor or is absent when the Governor is also absent, the next most senior judge of the Supreme Court is sworn in as the Administrator. This occurred in May 1973 when Sir Leslie Herron died suddenly while the governor, Sir Roden Cutler was overseas. Sir John Kerr became the administrator until Cutler was able to return.[4][2]

Lieutenant-governors and administrators of NSW[edit]

Name Term start Term end Notes
Major Robert Ross 7 February 1788 8 July 1792 [5]
Major Francis Grose 11 December 1792 12 December 1794 [6]
Lieutenant-Colonel William Paterson 13 December 1794 1 September 1795 [7]
Office vacant 20 September 1795 September 1800
Colonel William Paterson September 1800 26 January 1808 [8]
Major George Johnston 26 January 1808 25 April 1808 [9]
Lieutenant-Colonel Joseph Foveaux 25 April 1808 9 January 1809 [5]
Lieutenant-Colonel Sir Maurice O'Connell 10 January 1810 12 February 1814 [5]
Colonel George Molle 13 February 1814 12 September 1817 [5]
Colonel James Erskine 12 September 1817 25 February 1823 [5]
Colonel William Stewart 26 February 1823 23 March 1827 [5]
Office vacant 24 March 1827 4 December 1837
Colonel Patrick Lindesay 22 October 1831 2 December 1831 [11]
Lieutenant-Colonel Kenneth Snodgrass 5 December 1837 23 February 1838 [5]
Office vacant 24 February 1838 12 July 1846
Sir Maurice O'Connell 12 July 1846 2 August 1846 [5]
Office vacant 2 August 1846 21 January 1861 [5]
Lieutenant-Colonel John Francis Kempt 22 January 1861 21 March 1861 [12]
Office vacant 22 March 1861 21 May 1867 [5]
Major-General Sir Trevor Chute December 1867 January 1868 [5]
Office vacant 1868 21 February 1872 [5]
Lieutenant-Governors held concurrently by the Chief Justice
Sir Alfred Stephen 22 February 1872 26 November 1891
Sir Frederick Darley 26 November 1891 30 March 1910 [13]
George Bowen Simpson 24 March 1909 27 January 1910 [5]
Sir William Cullen 30 March 1910 1 October 1930 [14]
Sir Philip Street 1 October 1930 17 October 1938 [15]
Sir Frederick Jordan 17 October 1938 4 November 1949 [16]
Sir Kenneth Street 27 February 1950 22 April 1972 [17]
Sir Leslie Herron 22 April 1972 3 May 1973 [18]
Sir John Kerr 30 August 1973 1 July 1974 [19]
Sir Laurence Street 1 July 1974 24 July 1989 [20]
Anthony Murray Gleeson 24 July 1989 18 June 1998 [21]
James Spigelman 18 June 1998 1 February 2012 [22]
Tom Bathurst 1 February 2012 Present [1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "C2012-09 Lieutenant-Governor of New South Wales". Department of Premier and Cabinet Circular. Department of Premier and Cabinet. 2012. Retrieved 3 March 2018.
  2. ^ a b "PROCLAMATION". Government Gazette Of The State Of New South Wales (61). New South Wales, Australia. 28 May 1974. p. 2029. Retrieved 3 March 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  3. ^ "Nathan Rees looking to topple Morris Iemma this morning". livenews.com.au. 5 September 2008. Archived from the original on 1 December 2008. Retrieved 24 November 2008. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  4. ^ Personal Details Sir John Kerr, State Records of NSW. Retrieved 4 January 2010
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n "Former Lieutenant-Governors". NSW Department of Premier and Cabinet. Retrieved 16 April 2019.
  6. ^ "Governors". Portland Guardian and Normanby General Advertiser. Vic.: National Library of Australia. 6 January 1868. p. 4 Edition: EVENINGS. Retrieved 7 November 2012.
  7. ^ "Our Former Governors". The Sydney Morning Herald. National Library of Australia. 16 March 1895. p. 9. Retrieved 7 November 2012.
  8. ^ David S. Macmillan, 'Paterson, William (1755–1810)', Australian Dictionary of Biography, Volume 2, Melbourne University Press, 1967, pp 317-319. . Retrieved 27 July 2009
  9. ^ Colonial Secretary Index, 1788-1825 Archived 5 June 2009 at the Wayback Machine, State Records of NSW. Johnston assumed the role on the arrest of William Bligh. Retrieved 27 July 2009
  10. ^ "Colonel Lindesay sworn in as Acting Governor". The Australian. 28 October 1831. p. 2. Retrieved 16 April 2019 – via National Library of Australia.
  11. ^ He is listed as a former Lieutenant-Governor,[5] however it would appear he was appointed as Acting Governor.[10]
  12. ^ Walsh, G P. "Kempt, John Francis (1805–1865)". Australian Dictionary of Biography. Canberra: Australian National University. Retrieved 16 April 2019.
  13. ^ "The Lieutenant Governorship of New South Wales". The Mercury. Tasmania, Australia. 1 December 1891. p. 3. Retrieved 3 March 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  14. ^ "New South Wales". Government Gazette Of The State Of New South Wales (65). 6 May 1910. p. 2469. Retrieved 3 March 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  15. ^ "Appointment of Lieutenant Governor of New South Wales". Government Gazette Of The State Of New South Wales (73). New South Wales, Australia. 10 June 1932. p. 1805. Retrieved 3 March 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  16. ^ "New South Wales". Government Gazette Of The State Of New South Wales (3). New South Wales, Australia. 6 January 1939. p. 71. Retrieved 3 March 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  17. ^ "Government Gazette Appointments and Employment". Government Gazette Of The State Of New South Wales (57). New South Wales, Australia. 31 March 1950. p. 864. Retrieved 3 March 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  18. ^ "New South Wales". Government Gazette Of The State Of New South Wales (52). New South Wales, Australia. 19 May 1972. p. 1721. Retrieved 3 March 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  19. ^ "New South Wales". Government Gazette Of The State Of New South Wales (155). New South Wales, Australia. 14 December 1973. p. 5321. Retrieved 3 March 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  20. ^ "New South Wales". Government Gazette Of The State Of New South Wales (91). New South Wales, Australia. 2 August 1974. p. 2955. Retrieved 3 March 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  21. ^ "Government Gazette Appointments and Employment". Government Gazette Of The State Of New South Wales (85). New South Wales, Australia. 28 July 1989. p. 4757. Retrieved 3 March 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  22. ^ "Government Gazette Appointments and Employment". Government Gazette Of The State Of New South Wales (96). New South Wales, Australia. 19 June 1998. p. 4415. Retrieved 3 March 2018 – via National Library of Australia.

External links[edit]